Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 21

Thread: Message from PVA about Airplane Travel

  1. #11
    Please note that this bill will NOT require that airlines set up systems to allow people to ride in planes in their wheelchairs...it will only require that a feasibility study be done about this. It is most likely that the study would come to these same conclusions.

    Other features of this bill are a significant improvement in the current Air Access Act.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    Please note that this bill will NOT require that airlines set up systems to allow people to ride in planes in their wheelchairs...it will only require that a feasibility study be done about this. It is most likely that the study would come to these same conclusions.

    Other features of this bill are a significant improvement in the current Air Access Act.

    (KLD)
    What other features are you seeing as benefits for our community?

  3. #13
    Did you read the bill? https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-...bill/1318/text

    ? 41705. Accessibility of air transportation for individuals with disabilities
    “(b) Prohibited actions.— “(1) IN GENERAL.—An air carrier may not—
    “(A) directly or through a contractual, licensing, or other arrangement, discriminate in the full and equal enjoyment (within the meaning of that term under section 302(a) of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12182(a))) of air transportation;
    “(B) deny the opportunity of an individual or a class of individuals, on the basis of a disability or disabilities of the individual or class, to participate in or benefit from the goods, services, facilities, advantages, accommodations, or other opportunities provided by the air carrier;
    “(C) afford an individual or a class of individuals, on the basis of a disability or disabilities of the individual or class, with the opportunity to participate in or benefit from a good, service, facility, advantage, accommodation, or other opportunity that is not equal to a good, service, facility, advantage, accommodation, or other opportunity afforded to other individuals;
    “(D) subject to paragraph (2), provide an individual or a class of individuals, on the basis of a disability or disabilities of the individual or class, with a good, service, facility, privilege, advantage, accommodation, or other opportunity that is different or separate from a good, service, facility, privilege, advantage, accommodation, or other opportunity provided to other individuals;
    “(E) deny any goods, services, facilities, privileges, advantages, accommodations, or other opportunities to an individual because of the known disability of another individual with whom the individual is known to have a relationship or association;
    “(F) impose or apply eligibility criteria that screen out or have the effect of screening out individuals with disabilities or a class of individuals with disabilities from fully enjoying any good, service, facility, privilege, advantage, accommodation, or other opportunity provided by the air carrier, unless the air carrier can demonstrate that such criteria are necessary for the provision of the good, service, facility, privilege, advantage, accommodation, or other opportunity;
    “(G) directly or through a contractual, licensing, or other arrangement, use standards or criteria or methods of administration—
    “(i) that have the effect of discriminating on the basis of disability; or
    “(ii) that perpetuate the discrimination of others who are subject to common administrative control;
    “(H) purchase or lease an aircraft that does not comply with this section and regulations prescribed under this section; or
    “(I) refurbish an aircraft manufactured before the date of the enactment of the Air Carrier Access Amendments Act of 2017, or purchase or lease such an aircraft, unless the aircraft, to the maximum extent feasible, is made readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities, including individuals who use wheelchairs, in accordance with this section and upon issuance of regulations prescribed under this section.
    This would prohibit practices such as those where a well-known disability activist was denied a flight (earlier this year) because the pilot was not "comfortable" having him aboard.

    SEC. 6. Regulations.

    (a) Accessibility of air travel to individuals with disabilities.— (1) ASSISTANCE.—
    (A) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall prescribe or revise regulations to ensure that individuals with disabilities who request assistance at any time while traveling in air transportation receive timely and effective assistance at airports and on aircraft from trained personnel. Such assistance may be in boarding or deplaning an aircraft, connecting between flights, or any other similar or related request.
    (B) TRAINING.—The Secretary shall require air carriers to ensure that personnel, including contractors, who may be providing physical assistance to a passenger with a disability receive hands-on training on an annual basis in performing that assistance, including the use of all equipment.
    You may have been lucky to run into only "properly trained" people helping you board and unboard, but that is certainly not the experience I have had traveling with my mother, and reported by many on this site, and my clients, some of whom have actually been injured by untrained "lifters".

    SEC. 8. Airline Passengers with Disabilities Bill of Rights.
    (a) Airline passengers with disabilities bill of rights.—The Secretary shall develop a document, to be known as the “Airline Passengers with Disabilities Bill of Rights”, using plain language to describe the basic rights and responsibilities of air carriers, their employees and contractors, and people with disabilities under the section 41705 of title 49, United States Code, as amended by section 4.


    and

    SEC. 10. Advisory committee on the air travel needs of passengers with disabilities. (a) In general.—The Secretary shall establish an advisory committee for the air travel needs of passengers with disabilities (in this section referred to as the “advisory committee”) to advise the Secretary in implementing section 41705 of title 49, United States Code, as amended by section 4.
    These were not a part of the original bill and needed to be added.

    That is not all inclusive, but hits the high points.

    (KLD)





    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  4. #14
    Senior Member brian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    1,026
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    Please note that this bill will NOT require that airlines set up systems to allow people to ride in planes in their wheelchairs...it will only require that a feasibility study be done about this. It is most likely that the study would come to these same conclusions.
    Thanks for that reminder, KLD.

    I wanted to highlight that issue because in this thread and often others about air travel, there's always a few people that champion staying in their chairs on a plane. We should not be getting our hopes up about that and it's important to know why: It's dangerous for us and everyone else on board due to force of impact and how our chairs are designed.

    I didn't mean to sound dismissive of the entire amendment. Baby with the bathwater and all.

  5. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Saint Petersburg , Florida
    Posts
    589
    I would be happy if every airport had a Eagle 2 lift. That would make flying a lot easier!

  6. #16
    I have emailed one of my Senators to request sponsorship of Sen. Baldwin's bill. I will add that an option I'd like to see is on-board stowage of any wheelchair, rather than treating it like "luggage" and stowing it in a compartment beneath the plane. How many pieces of luggage cost upwards of $2,000? Why do you think luggage companies advertise the punishment their luggage can tolerate when you travel by air?

    If the wheelchair could be stowed empty in a separate area of the passenger compartment, probably the size of two seats, with some kind of "cage" device over the whole chair and locked in place, or even in a separate "room", that solution would prevent movement or damage of parts. Some chair-users would want to remain in their chairs, others would not.
    I definitely feel further research on this is needed, so that one day air travel will be so much easier for persons with a disability.

  7. #17
    A "what came first the chicken or the egg" conundrum. Would wheelchair manufacturers be challenged to make better, safer wheelchairs for travel if wheelchair users stayed in their chairs in flight.

  8. #18
    Senior Member brian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    1,026
    Quote Originally Posted by triumph View Post
    How many pieces of luggage cost upwards of $2,000?
    People trust valuables well over $2000 in the luggage holds of airplanes all the time. Laptops, cameras, and other electronics are packed below deck on every flight every day.

    Quote Originally Posted by triumph View Post
    If the wheelchair could be stowed empty in a separate area of the passenger compartment, probably the size of two seats, with some kind of "cage" device over the whole chair and locked in place, or even in a separate "room", that solution would prevent movement or damage of parts. Some chair-users would want to remain in their chairs, others would not.
    You're suggesting that two seats be removed form the front of the plane which is normally first- and business-class sections. The loss of those seats would increase the ticket price for every one else on board. And you're also suggesting that those who would want to stay seated in their chair would sit in this 'cage' you propose? How exactly would that work?


    Quote Originally Posted by gjnl View Post
    A "what came first the chicken or the egg" conundrum. Would wheelchair manufacturers be challenged to make better, safer wheelchairs for travel if wheelchair users stayed in their chairs in flight.
    I'm sure they would, but at a premium price. Chairs that would be "approved for flying" would have to be all-new designs with stronger materials. Why would insurance cover a $6,000 "FAA Approved" manual chair when a normal manual chair would still cost $2000? You'd likely be paying out of pocket and I don't think the demand is there.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by brian View Post
    I'm sure they would, but at a premium price. Chairs that would be "approved for flying" would have to be all-new designs with stronger materials. Why would insurance cover a $6,000 "FAA Approved" manual chair when a normal manual chair would still cost $2000? You'd likely be paying out of pocket and I don't think the demand is there.
    Better and safer chairs wouldn't be a bad thing for all forms of transportation, i.e., car, plane, train, mass transit.

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    Did you read the bill? https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-...bill/1318/text

    [B]

    This would prohibit practices such as those where a well-known disability activist was denied a flight (earlier this year) because the pilot was not "comfortable" having him aboard.





    You may have been lucky to run into only "properly trained" people helping you board and unboard, but that is certainly not the experience I have had traveling with my mother, and reported by many on this site, and my clients, some of whom have actually been injured by untrained "lifters".



    and



    These were not a part of the original bill and needed to be added.

    That is not all inclusive, but hits the high points.

    (KLD)
    [/LEFT]


    I did read it and I had others like myself that travel a lot read it and they too thought it was a waste of efforts.

    Government overreach is not needed the laws and support are there our community just needs to stand up and exercise their voice and needs.

    "This would prohibit practices such as those where a well-known disability activist was denied a flight (earlier this year) because the pilot was not "comfortable" having him aboard."

    What activist was denied a flight?

    If you're thinking who I think your talking about you notice how that story just disappeared with zero follow up and though he would never admit it his was simply airlines practice of overbooking and he was singled out to give up his seat. Had nothing to do with his disability.

    I am by no means "lucky" my Wife will tell you our 1st years of traveling with a larger 3 wheel scooter ended in non stop disasters. I like others left it up to the "experts" after enough damage and then repairs I became the expert 1st learning everything I could about boarding mobility and unboarding.

    We worked with the corporate office of Southwest Airlines on helping them come up with new procedures and best practices.

    When you engage in your boarding process and explain your needs and your chairs break down it minimizes the issues.

    We have since worked with executive levels with Delta, US West now American, Jet Blue, Hawaiian Air, etc

    Luck has nothing to do with it...Its our life and when you become the expert you can tell others things that will help simplify our lives.



    +++$2000 limit is for suitcases only doesn't have anything to do with wheelchairs, powerchairs, walkers etc that is repaid at the repair cost or replacement full cost.

    If they started removing seats to accommodate wheelchairs then that is going to drive up the cost of seats even higher...Simple supply and demand less seats = more cost per seat.
    Last edited by RollPositive; 08-23-2017 at 02:02 PM.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 23
    Last Post: 02-25-2015, 09:46 PM
  2. Torso Belt for Airplane Travel
    By wheelchair traveler in forum Recreation, Sports, Travel, & Hobbies
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-30-2013, 12:18 AM
  3. airplane travel questions
    By grommet in forum Recreation, Sports, Travel, & Hobbies
    Replies: 41
    Last Post: 07-27-2011, 08:44 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •