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Thread: Anyone used or purchased a "POP N DROP" ?

  1. #1

    Anyone used or purchased a "POP N DROP" ?

    I've seen this product on eBay. It consists of a brace that fits onto a rigid manual chair and connects to an electric scooter (sold separately). The guy that invented it is quadraplegic, out of Florida. Looks neat, and certainly cheaper than some other options, but I would like some other opinions on it from users, if possible. Thanks

  2. #2
    Very much like the idea of the old Damaco D90 device (discontinued in 1999).

    You do need to be able to steer with the scooter type steering bar and controls, which would not work for a lot of people with significant upper extremity paralysis. The price ($325) is also ONLY for the bracket, and does not include either the rigid frame wheelchair (will not work with a folder) nor the scooter/motor.

    https://www.myfastchair.com/

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  3. #3
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    I wish that had been around 10 years ago when I tried connecting a Razor scooter to my son's chair! I went through a few different methods, none of which were as good as what this guy has come up with. Back then lithium batteries didn't exist (or at least I didn't want to spend that sort of money on something that might not work effectively), but these days I think a lithium scooter with attachment is a very cost effective way of getting both speed and distance.

    Whilst I'm obviously not a user of that product, it looks as if it would do the job well.

    I do agree with the inventor's comments about stability and helmets...take those corners slowly!

    FYI my son, who is now 14, has just got a SmartDrive...he's also got a partially homemade electric fat-wheeled attachment (think of a very boosted Firefly and you will get the idea)...they all have pros and cons, nothing is perfect for every scenario unfortunately...but the scooter+attachment is definitely the most cost effective option.
    Gordon, father of son who became t6 paraplegic at the age of 4 in 2007 as a result of surgery to remove a spinal tumour.

  4. #4
    i built something like this and also used an electric scooter. it had a little bigger wheels but the batteries didnt last long.

  5. #5
    Thanks for the replies, guys. Still researching, actually am going to try to get my insurance to cover a Smart Drive, that's what I really want. Seems like a better option for me.

  6. #6
    that looks awesome!

  7. #7
    Hi sarcastrix. Yup it looks awesome but I haven't gotten one reply from a user on this forum, which is telling. I would assume at least one person here may have at least tried it but it seems not. That makes me hesitant to go any further even tho its significantly cheaper than other options. Buyer beware, I guess.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Podkane View Post
    Hi sarcastrix. Yup it looks awesome but I haven't gotten one reply from a user on this forum, which is telling. I would assume at least one person here may have at least tried it but it seems not. That makes me hesitant to go any further even tho its significantly cheaper than other options. Buyer beware, I guess.
    i looked at pretty neat but i can not do a wheelie so it was out its pretty cool but.......

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Podkane View Post
    Hi sarcastrix. Yup it looks awesome but I haven't gotten one reply from a user on this forum, which is telling. I would assume at least one person here may have at least tried it but it seems not. That makes me hesitant to go any further even tho its significantly cheaper than other options. Buyer beware, I guess.
    Personally I wouldn't have any concern about the product itself. I think the reason that nobody here has tried it is (a) this product is fairly new, and/or (b) anyone who has decided to use an electric scooter has probably been able to work out a way to connect it to their chair themselves (like we did, and so have several other chair users - have a look on YouTube).

    From my son's recent experience with his new SmartDrive (funded thankfully), I'd say that an electric scooter is a great, fast, simple and cheap solution, versus a very complex, slower, expensive but powerful solution. Obviously the cost factor (roughly x10) is due to electric scooters being mass produced for everyone, but the SmartDrive only for the wheelchair community....

    And it's only recently that scooters have been using lithium batteries. The cheap razor scooter (with SLA batteries) that my son used would only last for 40 minutes (so similar to Royb's comment). Lithium = far greater distance. If my son didn't now have his SmartDrive and e-bike attachment then I would be getting him a lithium scooter, without a doubt.
    Gordon, father of son who became t6 paraplegic at the age of 4 in 2007 as a result of surgery to remove a spinal tumour.

  10. #10
    Thanks Gordy1. Good comments, which I will take into consideration

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