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Thread: Milking it for all it's worth

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Oddity View Post
    I think this is true, but I don't think it's necessarily 'wrong' and it certainly isn't 'automatically' putting people in classes, as in it's not arbitrary or random, it's based on life circumstances and the choices the injured person made before their injury.
    Yeah Jenn, screw you for being a twelve year old layabout when you woke up paralyzed.

  2. #22
    Senior Member lynnifer's Avatar
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    Exactly. Out of touch with your usual enlightened worthy responses Oddity.

    My parents did not believe in life insurance (ole farmers) and always believed that they would rather have the person, not money in their place. This was the culture of 1985 and the seventies.

    Are you saying they should have had life insurance including disability for their children should something have happened? (Seems more appropriate and popular in these days).

    It still isn't fair that a kid who is disabled - perhaps more disabled than able to work - has to live on $800-1200 per month for the rest of their lives while this person turns down multi-millions. People born with spina bifida would not qualify for life insurance. What do they do?

    It IS an unfair system!
    Make America Sane Again. lol

    T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

  3. #23
    Senior Member Andy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lynnifer View Post
    It still isn't fair that a kid who is disabled - perhaps more disabled than able to work - has to live on $800-1200 per month for the rest of their lives while this person turns down multi-millions.
    Well, you can sleep soundly that assuming the lawyer took 1/3, and she lives to around 65, she will have to suffer with roughly $200K a month for the rest of her life.

    You know it is a ridiculous settlement if a bunch of people on a SCI board are ragging on it

  4. #24
    Senior Member lynnifer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    I was involved once in a case where a middle-aged man drove his motorcycle too wide around a sharp turn on a rural (state) road head on into a truck. Sustained a T4 complete injury and a TBI. Sued the state saying that the signage did not indicate that the turn was that sharp. Lots of testimony by experts on motorcycles and highway safety and design. Final judgment was for $9 million, but jury determined also that the man was 90% responsible for the accident (driving too fast, not maintaining control, etc.) and that the state was only 10% negligent, so he got "only" $900,000, of which his attorney took 1/3 ($300,000).
    (KLD)
    Enough to retrofit a house and go back to school leading to a career. I haven't started yet, but I'd like to lobby our Canadian government for free tuition for spinal cord injured only (so fraud is cut down) because of the poor employment rate etc. Some sort of universal health and drug coverage too ... because that's what keep so many 'trapped' on disability welfare.
    Make America Sane Again. lol

    T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

  5. #25
    Senior Member Oddity's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scaper1 View Post
    Yeah Jenn, screw you for being a twelve year old layabout when you woke up paralyzed.
    Do you seriously read me blaming Jen for the circumstances of her injury in my post?!? Jesus, the victim mentality runs deep and wide around here.

    To be clear: Her story falls directly into both things I cited as the reasons for the disparity in outcomes: life/injury circumstances (being 12) and choices (her parents choosing to 'not believe' in insurance). This isn't a judgment, it's an observation of the reality of why things are different between outcomes.

    Neither of these things are (or were) 'her fault', neither was her injury as far as I know (which I don't, but am willing to assume.)
    A Buddhist monk walked up to the guy working behind a hot dog cart and said, "Make me one with everything."

    "Even what those with the greatest reputation for knowing it all claim to understand and defend are but opinions..." -Heraclitus

  6. #26
    Senior Member Andy's Avatar
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    It seems the City had enough sense to not operate as a self-insured entity in regards to the airport, seems AIG will be paying this jackpot taking some of the sting out of it for the rest of us:

    http://chicago.suntimes.com/chicago-...bout-her-legs/

    Jurors giving the plaintiff hugs after the trial, now there is a sign that this award was rationally formulated. I am sure that a 24 year old member of a dance troupe enrolled at a 2 year college had some serious loss of income potential due to her injury and this was reflected in the award amount.

    Ok, enough expressing my bewilderment regarding this. Yes, it sucks for her, but still, holy shit...what a jackpot!



    Remember paras: Being pushed by family members can generate added sympathy
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  7. #27
    Senior Member Oddity's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lynnifer View Post
    Exactly. Out of touch with your usual enlightened worthy responses Oddity.

    My parents did not believe in life insurance (ole farmers) and always believed that they would rather have the person, not money in their place. This was the culture of 1985 and the seventies.

    Are you saying they should have had life insurance including disability for their children should something have happened? (Seems more appropriate and popular in these days).

    It still isn't fair that a kid who is disabled - perhaps more disabled than able to work - has to live on $800-1200 per month for the rest of their lives while this person turns down multi-millions. People born with spina bifida would not qualify for life insurance. What do they do?

    It IS an unfair system!

    Tell me about it. It's hard being me, but it's the cross I choose to bear.


    It isn't an unfair system. I'm not even sure it's even 'a system'.

    If it were a 'system', would the system be 'fair' if it took dramatically different inputs, between one person and another, then generated the exact same output for both? E.g. Would it be 'more fair' if one person input tens and tens of thousands of their income into disability risk management, over decades, only to receive the exact same output as someone who inputted zero?

    Equity in outcomes is not necessarily the same thing as the 'fairness' of a process, or a system.

    (And, yes, parents should have the presence of mind to manage their family's risk to the best of their ability, ESPECIALLY for their minor children who cannot do it for themselves.)
    A Buddhist monk walked up to the guy working behind a hot dog cart and said, "Make me one with everything."

    "Even what those with the greatest reputation for knowing it all claim to understand and defend are but opinions..." -Heraclitus

  8. #28
    Senior Member Oddity's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lynnifer View Post
    Enough to retrofit a house and go back to school leading to a career. I haven't started yet, but I'd like to lobby our Canadian government for free tuition for spinal cord injured only (so fraud is cut down) because of the poor employment rate etc. Some sort of universal health and drug coverage too ... because that's what keep so many 'trapped' on disability welfare.

    Sure! Nothing at all wrong with using our government's tax revenue to help people that need it IMO. That's exactly what a collective government should do! But, the 'system' that supports people via tax money is completely separate from the 'system' that awards settlements and insurance payouts. Conflating the 2, then crying foul, or worse: resenting yourself or other people, is just not warranted IMO.
    A Buddhist monk walked up to the guy working behind a hot dog cart and said, "Make me one with everything."

    "Even what those with the greatest reputation for knowing it all claim to understand and defend are but opinions..." -Heraclitus

  9. #29
    Senior Member Oddity's Avatar
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    Where I think lynnifer was exactly right, is, the presence of rift between 'have settlement' and 'not have settlement' folks.

    It most often presents as 'disabled young/born disabled' and 'disabled as a functional adult'.

    The basketball team I played for, years ago, was markedly divided between these 2 populations. The resentment was palpable and started more than one argument that I can vividly remember. Half of us were 30+, gainfully employed and/or well insured, while the other half were disabled their whole lives.

    I don't pretend to know how much more difficult a life could be; if disabled from birth or very young, compared to my experience, but I do believe they are remarkably different experiences (even if I don't subscribe to the 'fair vs unfair' point of view).

    The gap in experiences is real, the struggles are quite different, and I'd say it might come almost as close as 'quad vs para' levels of disparate experience.
    A Buddhist monk walked up to the guy working behind a hot dog cart and said, "Make me one with everything."

    "Even what those with the greatest reputation for knowing it all claim to understand and defend are but opinions..." -Heraclitus

  10. #30
    Senior Member Andy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oddity View Post
    If it were a 'system', would the system be 'fair' if it took dramatically different inputs, between one person and another, then generated the exact same output for both? E.g. Would it be 'more fair' if one person input tens and tens of thousands of their income into disability risk management, over decades, only to receive the exact same output as someone who inputted zero?

    Equity in outcomes is not necessarily the same thing as the 'fairness' of a process, or a system
    Hey, that is treading into that whole personal responsibility space...none of that alt-right talk in this forum!

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