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Thread: Advantage Bags? Wheelchair backpack advice?

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    Using a leg bag without straps to drain into (and later discard the urine) instead of a urinal would save you a lot of space needs, and makes easier to avoid spills than a urinal. Keep it in a baggie, and then clean when you return home each day.

    (KLD)
    Problem is that unless you clean the leg back between uses, the urine may grow bacteria and you may infect yourself the next time you cath. Keeping it in a plastic bag does not mitigate that risk. It only changes the bacteria from aerobic to anaerobic.

  2. #22
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by August West View Post
    Problem is that unless you clean the leg back between uses, the urine may grow bacteria and you may infect yourself the next time you cath. Keeping it in a plastic bag does not mitigate that risk. It only changes the bacteria from aerobic to anaerobic.
    Is that different than a bottle, though?
    Rollin' since '89. Complete C8

  3. #23
    The flutter valve in a good leg bag prevents back flow. We used this method for years, and only cleaned the bag at the end of the day (with 10% bleach solution), often using it multiple times a day. If we had access to water, we flushed it with tap water immediately after use, but that was often not the case. There is little risk of back-flow from the bag with the valve, as that is what it is for when using the leg bag with an indwelling catheter. The plastic bag is to prevent any leakage of urine inside the wheelchair bag between uses.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  4. #24
    (In response to Crappler post #14 - I forgot to include quote)

    There's no stretch to the bag, but I'm able to fit cath supplies + spare tube + CO2 cartridge, and there's still a bit of space in the front two pockets for keys if needed. The bag as suggested by KLD should fit with some careful packing. I like the bag - it stays out of the way and it's light. Hope that helps!

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Crappler View Post
    Is that different than a bottle, though?
    Of course it is. A bottle doesn't come in contact with your internal body.

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    The flutter valve in a good leg bag prevents back flow. We used this method for years, and only cleaned the bag at the end of the day (with 10% bleach solution), often using it multiple times a day. If we had access to water, we flushed it with tap water immediately after use, but that was often not the case. There is little risk of back-flow from the bag with the valve, as that is what it is for when using the leg bag with an indwelling catheter. The plastic bag is to prevent any leakage of urine inside the wheelchair bag between uses.

    (KLD)
    I'm glad you got away with it. But it isn't clean and is an easy way to colonize yourself. Because the tube that connects to the catheter is contaminated. There is a good reason why Medicare pays for single use catheters. This is one of them. DON'T COLONIZE YOURSELF.

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by August West View Post
    I'm glad you got away with it. But it isn't clean and is an easy way to colonize yourself. Because the tube that connects to the catheter is contaminated. There is a good reason why Medicare pays for single use catheters. This is one of them. DON'T COLONIZE YOURSELF.
    No scientific basis for your claims. Our infection control practitioners where I worked signed off on this procedure, and it is also promoted by SUNA.

    There is also no scientific evidence that proves that non-reuse of catheters prevents UTI or colonization. The Medicare and VA regulations on this were accomplished by lobbying by the catheter producing companies, without evidence to back it up, and of course they have no vested interest in selling more catheters, right?

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    No scientific basis for your claims. Our infection control practitioners where I worked signed off on this procedure, and it is also promoted by SUNA.

    There is also no scientific evidence that proves that non-reuse of catheters prevents UTI or colonization. The Medicare and VA regulations on this were accomplished by lobbying by the catheter producing companies, without evidence to back it up, and of course they have no vested interest in selling more catheters, right?

    (KLD)
    I understand there is debate whether or not an IC procedure needs to be sterile. Some say it only needs to be clean. But what you are recommending doesn't even meet the clean standard. It is introducing a direct path for bacteria to the urethra and bladder. I don't care who signed off on it. It isn't clean. You're rolling the dice.

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by August West View Post
    I understand there is debate whether or not an IC procedure needs to be sterile. Some say it only needs to be clean. But what you are recommending doesn't even meet the clean standard. It is introducing a direct path for bacteria to the urethra and bladder. I don't care who signed off on it. It isn't clean. You're rolling the dice.
    And where did you get your education and training in microbiology to be able to determine this?

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  10. #30
    The procedure is supposed to be sterile or at least clean. That's pretty much common knowledge. What you're recommending is the equivalent of sticking a dirty catheter inside one's body. No degree required to call that disgusting.
    Last edited by August West; 08-17-2017 at 04:44 AM.

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