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Thread: Best treatment for moisture lesion

  1. #1

    Best treatment for moisture lesion

    It will be four weeks tomorrow since I took to my bed. The problem I have is more related to moisture than a traditional pressure sore. Basically, in the folds of the skin at the very bottom of the buttock's going To the inner part of my leg at the very top is where the problem is. It just looks like a long thin cut now, but not deep at all and very Narrow, a millimetre or two. The nurses been putting a honey dressing on it and changing it every other day. It's definitely improving slowly. However, I took another swab a few days ago and they found another infection so I'm back on antibiotics. I'm just wondering whether the honey treatment is the right treatment?

  2. #2
    Medicinal honey is generally a good treatment for superficial wounds, and those that need chemical debridement, but it may be keeping the area too moist. Wounds should be kept moist, but a moisture caused wound can be kept too wet. Suggest to your wound care nurse that they use a dressing that wicks away excessive moisture, such as a foam or hydrocolloid dressing.

    Once the skin is broken in a moist area, it is very likely that the wound will be a "dirty" wound, which means that a culture of the surface of the wound is positive for bacteria. This is not the same as an infection, which would require additional signs and symptoms such as red, hot surrounding skin, pus, fever, or elevated white blood count (WBC).

    Prevention is the best measure. Use of a cushion that provides air flow, and does not hold heat in the moist area is best, and some have been successful in using something like Interdry AG, which not only wicks away moisture when properly applied, but is silver impregnated which is also anti-bacterial and anti-fungal.

    (KLD)

  3. #3
    There is no sign of redness or anything that looks like an infection in the wound, it was just the swab that detected something.


    Like you, I have been a bit worried that keeping the area moist is not the right thing to do. It's definitely improving, just a little bit slower than I had hoped. I sit on my Roho cushion with a cover. I purchased some new much thinner cotton jogging bottoms so I have those to where will I get back up which will hopefully stop me getting too warm. I also bought some special underwear that is made of a material that is supposed to stop, or help with sweating. And I've got a barrier cream called Proshield which is supposed to be very good.


    I am just concerned that the nurses are treating my problem as a pressure ulcer when it clearly is nothing of the kind. Obviously I have to be careful what I say, don't want to appear to be telling them how to do their job. But I feel that I should be allowed challenge treatment if I feel it's not working as quickly as it should be.

    If I Can I will post a photograph tomorrow. I can even include a photo taken on July 31 and one taken tomorrow so you can see the difference in a few days.

  4. #4
    Prevention is the best measure. Use of a cushion that provides air flow, and does not hold heat in the moist area is best,

    (KLD)
    Look into a cushion that uses an internal fan to work on keeping the skin dry. Aquila makes such a cushion.
    Last edited by SCI-Nurse; 08-04-2017 at 11:36 AM. Reason: Corrected quote

  5. #5
    I do not recommend the Aquila cushion. While it does have a fan, it's pressure reduction is not very good. I corrected your post as it appears that you have me recommending it for this member.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  6. #6
    A shame. I highly recommend the Aquila cushion. They have all sorts of clinical reports and great testimonials and have a pressure mapping video on their website that shows very impressive pressure relief. That cushion works great for my dad when nothing else seemed to work. It may be worth another look.

  7. #7
    Testimonials and testing done by a manufacturer and not an independent lab or researcher does not make for real science.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Prerun's Avatar
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    Ditch the underwear! I would be spraying the area with Microcyn several times per day.

  9. #9
    This response is directed to the SCI nurse whose post is shown above. she thinks the studies on the Aquila website were done by employees of the company like roho has. Below is a list of the medical professionals that administered and wrote the clinical studies and reports on the Aquila cushions.

    Go to www.aquilacorp.com to the clinical studies tab which shows that these studies were not done by the manufacturer. The Studies authors are : Gary A. Wu, PhD1 and Kath M. Bogie, DPhil1,2,* These study authors are not employees of Aquila, nor is Dr Barry Farr, or Dr Holliman, or Karol A. Gutowski, MD, FACS Associate Professor of Surgery Residency Program Director Chief of Plastic Surgery, Wm S Middleton VA Hospital, nor is J. Gregory Jones, MD, Comprehensive Wound Center, Deaconess Medical Center, Spokane, Washington Eddie M. Lipan, MD, Tempe St. Luke’s Hospital, Tempe, Arizona nor is Nancy Gilligan Anderson, RN, WCC
    Nurse Manager nor is Carie L. Wolf, RN
    Home Care Supervisor, or Cathy Henderson, PT, MS, ATP or Robert Miller, M.D.
    Robert Meehan, P.T.
    License #6902.

    Want some science? This was taken from one of the studies. The
    LDF was measured using the Laserflo Blood Perfusion Monitor 2 (V?samed Inc; Eden Prairie, Minnesota) and the Softip pencil probe (model P-435, V?samed Inc).
    TcPO2 was measured using a TCM400 monitor (Radiometer Medical; Br?nsh?j, Denmark).

    Thank goodness you were not my fathers nurse because with your advice he would still be imprisoned in bed.

    Last edited by pearlstreet; 08-04-2017 at 05:16 PM.

  10. #10
    I was talking to one of the clinical nurses from the spinal-cord unit a while back about these alternating cushions. He was telling me that even though the cushion alternates and you get low-pressure for a period of time, the part of the cushion that is inflated produces very high pressure points. So basically you are going to be sitting on a cushion that is going between low-pressure and very high pressure for the entirety of the day.


    I've also been on their website and read all the testimonials. The testimonials are very positive and will probably give people a lot of hope. However, I just don't trust testimonials because anybody can write them. If you search the Internet and you will find statements that completely contradict these excellent testimonials.


    It's funny that nobody has come on here and documented using one of these cushions in all the years that these cushions have been available. You think that if they were that fantastic there will be loads of stories from genuine users who could provide a weekly photograph of a pressure ulcer improving because of this seating.

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