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Thread: A card for AD

  1. #11
    In addition to an alert card to carry in your wallet, maybe a USB device you wear would be a good idea.

    I did a search for "USB medical alert jewelry." Got several hits. Here is one: http://www.elegantmedicalalert.com/s...%20Alert%20USB

  2. #12
    Senior Member Tim C.'s Avatar
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    are USB alert device ????
    Really ?

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Tim C. View Post
    are USB alert device ????
    Really ?
    The USB devices I mentioned are not "alert devices" in that they don't send out a message to a monitoring agency that something is wrong. They are wearable pieces, arm/ankle bracelets, necklaces/dog tags, arm bands with a USB "stick" attached (the device acts as the closure/clasp) to which you upload your medical data. They certainly wouldn't replace an alert card, but would give first responders and medical personnel a lot of information about you, should you be involved in an automobile accident, hit by a car while you are out and alone etc.
    Last edited by gjnl; 09-09-2017 at 07:53 PM.

  4. #14
    The problem with such USB devices is that you are going to be hard pressed to find a hospital, paramedic rig, or even physician's office which will allow you to plug a USB device into their computers now days. Too many have been the target of hackers and Trojan horses that may access or corrupt their data this way.

    When I was working, the hospital where I worked banned and set up a firewall preventing attaching any non-authorized USB device, laptop, tablet, etc. to their system at least 5 years ago...and for employees who needed a USB, with justification, thumb print encrypting, and promising your first-born, these were issued to select employees only, and set up so that they could get past the firewall. I had to get one (with great difficulty) just to upload PowerPoint slides from the hospital system to use when teaching or speaking at outside conferences.

    I would not substitute a USB for carrying a hard copy of an AD card, and even a hard copy of the AD clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) available on the PVA website from the Consortium for Spinal Cord Medicine.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    The problem with such USB devices is that you are going to be hard pressed to find a hospital, paramedic rig, or even physician's office which will allow you to plug a USB device into their computers now days. Too many have been the target of hackers and Trojan horses that may access or corrupt their data this way.

    When I was working, the hospital where I worked banned and set up a firewall preventing attaching any non-authorized USB device, laptop, tablet, etc. to their system at least 5 years ago...and for employees who needed a USB, with justification, thumb print encrypting, and promising your first-born, these were issued to select employees only, and set up so that they could get past the firewall. I had to get one (with great difficulty) just to upload PowerPoint slides from the hospital system to use when teaching or speaking at outside conferences.

    I would not substitute a USB for carrying a hard copy of an AD card, and even a hard copy of the AD clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) available on the PVA website from the Consortium for Spinal Cord Medicine.

    (KLD)
    Good point.

    There are a couple of services for athletes like Road ID: https://www.roadid.com/ourstory.
    These services include various wearable tags (5 or 6 lines of information like medical ID jewelry) and the ability to upload medical information to a secure website that can be accessed by going to the website. How secure this may be is questionable, especially if you would lose the tag.

    Then there are medical apps on your cell phones that can be accessed by paramedics and medical personnel under the ICE (In Case of Emergency) program. https://incaseofemergency.org/

    Vial of Life: http://www.vialoflife.com/how_to_use_the_vial_of_life/

    All said and done, there probably isn't a foolproof method to pass on emergency medical information to personnel who can help you. I wonder how many times paramedics or medical personnel look for anything that isn't attached to your person.

  6. #16
    We recommended the Vial of Life program to our patients at our hospital, and for new injuries, I would set them up with a "Medical Passport" (expanded medical information wallet card) and a zip lock baggie with the Vial of Life sticker on it (and also include our AD card) plus a door jam Vial of Life sticker to use.

    Most 1st responders in the USA (EMTs, paramedics, fire dept., police, etc.) are familiar with this program. I also provided these clients with several hard copies of their "Medical Passport" to share with family members and to keep in their wallet, and if they wished, an electronic copy in Word format (with identifying data removed) sent to them via e-mail to keep updated as changes occurred.

    Our outpatient clinic nurse also provided this information to our outpatients, and either helped them create, or update, a "Medical Passport" and Vial of Life baggie for any outpatients for whom we provided primary care. There is no charge for the Vial of Life stickers (although they do request a donation) and they have a suggested medical passport form for downloading on their site as well.

    The Vial of life program has you put a baggie containing your information with their sticker on it on your refrigerator door (either taped in place or held with a magnet) and a sticker to put on the external door jam notifying 1st responders that such a Vial exists on the refrigerator door. If you have them for several family members, please mark clearly on the Vial of Life the name of the person so that they can grab the right one in an emergency.

    CARF accredited acute inpatient rehabilitation programs are required to provide the patient with such a "portable profile" upon discharge, and the patient must have input into the contents of the profile.


    (KLD)
    Last edited by SCI-Nurse; 09-09-2017 at 08:57 PM.
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    We recommended the Vial of Life program to our patients at our hospital, and for new injuries, I would set them up with a "Medical Passport" (expanded medical information wallet card) and a zip lock baggie with the Vial of Life sticker on it (and also include our AD card) plus a door jam Vial of Life sticker to use.

    Most 1st responders in the USA (EMTs, paramedics, fire dept., police, etc.) are familiar with this program. I also provided these clients with several hard copies of their "Medical Passport" to share with family members and to keep in their wallet, and if they wished, an electronic copy in Word format (with identifying data removed) sent to them via e-mail to keep updated as changes occurred.

    Our outpatient clinic nurse also provided this information to our outpatients, and either helped them create, or update, a "Medical Passport" and Vial of Life baggie for any outpatients for whom we provided primary care. There is no charge for the Vial of Life stickers (although they do request a donation) and they have a suggested medical passport form for downloading on their site as well.

    The Vial of life program has you put a baggie containing your information with their sticker on it on your refrigerator door (either taped in place or held with a magnet) and a sticker to put on the external door jam notifying 1st responders that such a Vial exists on the refrigerator door. If you have them for several family members, please mark clearly on the Vial of Life the name of the person so that they can grab the right one in an emergency.

    CARF accredited acute inpatient rehabilitation programs are required to provide the patient with such a "portable profile" upon discharge, and the patient must have input into the contents of the profile.


    (KLD)
    The Vial of Life program used to recommend that you fill out a form with your medical details, fold and roll the form to fit into a plastic medications container and place it in your refrigerator. We still have ours in the refrigerator, wooden cabinet fronts on the refrigerator don't work with magnets. We also have the vials in the glove box of our van.
    Last edited by gjnl; 09-10-2017 at 10:37 AM.

  8. #18
    All great information. The bottom line is that you need to be your advocate no matter what position you are in. This is a way to do that. Highly recommend that everyone with any medical problem do it.

    ckf
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by gjnl View Post
    The Vial of Life program used to recommend that you fill out a form with your medical details, fold and roll the form to fit into a plastic medications container and place it in your refrigerator. We still have ours in the refrigerator, wooden cabinet fronts on the refrigerator don't work with magnets. We also have the vials in the glove box of our van.
    They have not recommended this for many years (at least 10) as it was too difficult for 1st responders to find it inside the frig. Tape it to the front of the refrigerator in a baggie, as they recommend above. Using a med bottle also precludes including things like a laminated AD card in the vial as well.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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