Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Out of State Handicapped Parking Placard Not Recognized in Other States

  1. #1

    Out of State Handicapped Parking Placard Not Recognized in Other States

    Just read an article in the Los Times about a handicapped parking crackdown at the shopping center known as Glendale Galleria (Glendale, California). http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/l...htmlstory.html

    I was startled by the caption under one of the pictures in the article. In the picture a Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) officer is citing a driver for a handicapped parking violation. Clearly seen in the picture is a young girl sitting in a wheelchair, and yet the citation was made. Seems, as the caption reads, "An undercover Department of Motor Vehilces officer issues a citation to a family parking in a disabled parking spot with an out of state placard."

    For years, I've been under the impression that California had reciprocity with out of state jurisdictions to recognize other state's parking placards or license plates. Turns out that isn't the case.

    California DMV has four types of parking placards. https://www.dmv.ca.gov/portal/dmv/de...t_facts/ffvr07

    Types of DP Parking Placards

    • Permanent parking placard for permanent disabilities. Valid for two years and expires on June 30 of every odd-numbered year.
    • Temporary parking placard for temporary disabilities. Valid for up to 180 days (six months) or the date noted by your qualifying licensed medical professional on the application, whichever timeframe is less and cannot be renewed more than six times consecutively.
    • Travel parking placard for California residents who currently have a permanent DP parking placard or DP or DV license plates. Valid for 30 days from the date DMV issues it.
    • Travel parking placard for nonresidents who plan to travel in California and have a permanent disability and/or DV plates. Valid for up to 90 days or the date noted by your licensed medical professional on the application, whichever time frame is less.


    So it appears that you need to apply for a California travel parking placard if you are from out of state. You can't use your out of state parking placard to park in handicapped parking spots in California. You'd probably okay if you used you out of state parking placard in California. Most of the time, no one would take a second look. But you are taking a chance that you could be cited. See another Los Angeles Times article: http://www.latimes.com/business/la-f...205-story.html
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  2. #2
    and yet most other states accept California's placard. Good way to discourage tourists with disabilities from visiting CA!!! Sounds like a something PWD should convey to their state senators and assemblypeople to remedy by legislation. Might be a good idea to bring this up with some of the partially state funded non-profits who promote tourism for PWD like Accessible San Diego and Accessible Northern California too.

    (KLD)

  3. #3
    I travel, (drive) as an out of state visitor to Ca fairly often and have never had an issue with my placard. In fact I forgot to hang it once and got ticketed. I took the ticket and my out of state placard to the police station and pleaded forgetfullness, to which the tossed the ticket.

    I think the 90 day deal is for free meter parking from what I read above.
    I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

  4. #4
    The general rule for disabled placards is that they're valid in all states. But California requires that disabled visitors apply to the Department of Motor Vehicles for a so-called travel placard.

    It's good for 90 days.


    It will allow you to park free of charge at meters.

  5. #5
    The problem in general with CA disabled placards is that they allow you to park free of charge at any meter. Since my injury I've driven through maybe 30 of the 48 contiguous states and those that allow disabled permit holders to park wherever they please for free are invariably abused by "disabled" citizens who seem to get around just fine (example the shopkeepers loading wares from their vans with disabled placards to their shops in Chinatown San Fransisco with a placard in the window). The inherent incentive to get a placard is increased orders of magnitude when it makes all parking free and thus it puts those of us who need the parking at a disadvantage.

    I'd rather have the state place the intermittent disabled parking place, but charge me the same rate, instead of give me free parking anywhere I please. That way I might actually find a place to park.

  6. #6
    You have to be very careful using your placard in California, even if you are a California resident with a valid placard. You can't park free at ALL meters. Some meters are different. If the parking lot is a private lot, you can park in the designated handicapped parking spots, but you are likely to be ticketed if you park a a meter in that same lot. Trust me, I got one of these tickets and fought it and didn't have to pay the fine, but was told it was an courtesy accommodation because it was the first time I had parked illegally in a lot run by this private company.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by gjnl View Post
    You have to be very careful using your placard in California, even if you are a California resident with a valid placard. You can't park free at ALL meters. Some meters are different. If the parking lot is a private lot, you can park in the designated handicapped parking spots, but you are likely to be ticketed if you park a a meter in that same lot. Trust me, I got one of these tickets and fought it and didn't have to pay the fine, but was told it was an courtesy accommodation because it was the first time I had parked illegally in a lot run by this private company.
    This is confusing to me. How can a private lot give you a ticket? Does the city ticket private lots? If the private company gave you a ticket, I can't see that they have the ability to enforce it legally and make you pay it. Where I come from private lots just tow you, because they have a right to remove you from the lot, but I've never heard of a company being able to issue a ticket.

  8. #8
    Some "private" lots in CA are actually not privately owned, but belong to the city, and are managed through contract with one of the big companies like Ace. I suspect that is what is being described.

    (KLD)

  9. #9
    As KLD pointed, some cities do farm out enforcement of their on street metered parking and other city owned lots and structures to private companies to off load parking monitoring and collections from the city police department and courts.

    In my area a company named Park Smart manages private (not city owned) parking lots owned by downtown associations, a business that maintains parking for its customers only, and otherwise privately owned plots in town that are striped for parking and have meters on the lots. This company offers a variety of services to these privately owned parking lots including parking time limit enforcement, reserved parking enforcement, private property meter instillation, parking meter enforcement and collections. They have signs posted in these lots like the one pictured below. When the enforcement teams that patrol theses lots see a violation, they have a computerized system that takes pictures of the car and license plate (time/date stamped) and generate a notification of violation (a ticket or citation by any other name). The charge is $25.00 for the violation i.e., car with handicapped parking placard parked in a metered spot and meter not activated (no payment registered on the meter), car parked in a metered spot and time has run out on the meter, car parked in a metered spot for over 3 hours, meter activated or not, car carelessly parked and taking up more room than one spot, etc. If you don't pay the violation to the private company, they can attempt collection in a number of ways, calls to the owner of the car, threatening letters, collection agencies, small claims court. The key is to watch out for signs that indicated the public is welcome to park in a private lot for a fee. These lots have meters at all stalls except for the handicapped striped spots. You may park at these designated spots displaying your placard. I'm not sure, but I don't think these private lots enforce any kind of time limit when you are parked in the designated handicapped spots with a valid placard.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by gjnl; 04-16-2017 at 04:15 PM.

  10. #10
    Wow, I've never come across that before. I guess it's like privatized prisons in a way. Certainly is a windfall for the private companies running public services.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 36
    Last Post: 09-30-2011, 05:40 PM
  2. Disabled Parking Placard
    By Megatron in forum Life
    Replies: 68
    Last Post: 04-14-2011, 06:16 PM
  3. Replies: 7
    Last Post: 01-25-2011, 09:42 PM
  4. Question about parking at meters in NYC with a h/c placard
    By AKC in forum Recreation, Sports, Travel, & Hobbies
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 11-14-2009, 11:47 PM
  5. Display of Parking Placard
    By FasterNow in forum Life
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: 05-21-2008, 10:20 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •