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Thread: Problem free leg bag suggestions?

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by baldfatdad View Post
    If I'm understanding right you are also having a problem with the tubing collapsing? If that's true go to a hardware store, get some plastic tubing. I've used this for years. No kicks and no latex problems. Its also cheap and clear so you can see your urine.
    No sorry, I may not be explaining this well. The best way I can describe what's happening is to compare it to putting a straw in a glass of water and putting your finger on the top and lifting the straw out of the water. The vacuum affect keeps the water in the straw until you remove your finger from the top. That is what's happening with the leg bag tubing. The urine will not flow into the bag until I take the condom catheter off, which releases the vacuum in the tubing. There are no kinks in the tubing and the bag works like it should when it's not attached to me. I emailed hollister this morning and they confirmed they don't sell their tubing with the vacuum relief valve in it separately. This is different than the flutter valve in the top port of the bag. The vacuum relief valve is built into the upper connector that attaches to the condom catheter. I think that will solve my problem. I will order the hollister kit and hook the tubing up to my urocare bag next. I'm just surprised I haven't been able to find many other people having this problem.

  2. #22
    Why is there no urine in the collection bag? http://www.vitalitymedical.com/external-catheter.html
    • The condom catheter might be twisted or dislodged, preventing proper flow of urine to the bag.
    • Tubing might be kinked or obstructed. Make sure to regularly inspect the tubing accessory.
    • The external catheter may be too tight. If this is the case, the pressure would obstruct the urethra, preventing urine to freely flow into the collection bag.
    • A vacuum can sometimes occur at the end of the condom catheter and can inhibit drainage. You can break the vacuum by briefly disconnecting the drainage device.


    Vacuum relief valve http://www.hollister.com/en/continen...inenceglossary


    A feature on Hollister Incorporated leg bag tubing, which helps prevent collapse of the tubing.


    Vented leg bag

    A special vacuum-relief mechanism featured on Hollister Incorporated oval kink-resistant tubing and the companion pouch, which also features an air vent. These combined features help to minimize a vacuum in the leg bag, as well as in the tubing. A vacuum is created as the urine cools outside the body. The vacuum may stall urine drainage through the tubing and/or prevent the leg bag from emptying completely.

    Drainage: http://www.caremedicalsource.com/blo...rnal-catheter/
    Urine must be able to flow freely from the catheter, through the tubing, and into the bag. Before use, bags should be pulled apart gently. Aspirating the bag eliminates positive vacuum pressure. Thus, once the tube is assembled, urine will flow freely to the bag.


    https://www.biorelief.com/product/co...leg-bag-system
    Vaccum Effect: Some men have an issue with the leg bag and urine is retaining in the tubing and the catheter is collapsing while on the penis. What is happening is a vacuum effect when the leg bag is drained. When the urine is draining it is pulling the air with it creating the vacuum effect. This collapses the catheter and will not allow all the urine to drain from the tubing and the bag will appear to be stuck together.

    An easy way to alleviate this is to first make sure that there is a small pocket of air in the collection bag before the bag is used for the first time of the day. This can be done by blowing into the tubing before inserting the catheter in it. Then when the bag is drained do not drain the entire amount from the bag. Leave a small amount of urine in the bag ( an ounce or so) and this will prevent the vacuum you may experience. It should not interfere with the operation of the bag, but it’s better to not have this.

    See Page 29 of this PDF: http://files.sld.cu/urologia-enferme...en_2008_lr.pdf

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Brad09 View Post
    No sorry, I may not be explaining this well. The best way I can describe what's happening is to compare it to putting a straw in a glass of water and putting your finger on the top and lifting the straw out of the water. The vacuum affect keeps the water in the straw until you remove your finger from the top. That is what's happening with the leg bag tubing. The urine will not flow into the bag until I take the condom catheter off, which releases the vacuum in the tubing. There are no kinks in the tubing and the bag works like it should when it's not attached to me. I emailed hollister this morning and they confirmed they don't sell their tubing with the vacuum relief valve in it separately. This is different than the flutter valve in the top port of the bag. The vacuum relief valve is built into the upper connector that attaches to the condom catheter. I think that will solve my problem. I will order the hollister kit and hook the tubing up to my urocare bag next. I'm just surprised I haven't been able to find many other people having this problem.
    The urine is not going to go into the bag until the pressure is released (taking off the external cath or unhooking the cath from the tubing. If it's causing a problem, try taking the bag off of your leg, laying it beside you it will drain downhill, and the unhook the ext cath slightly(Not all the way but just enough to let air in) letting the urine flow into the bag. If there's any urine left in the ext cath then rehook to the bag and repeat. I use the Urocare 32oz and never have a problem.
    "It is every man's obligation to put back into the world at least the equivalent of what he takes out of it. Try not to become a man of success but rather try to become a man of value." - Albert Einstein

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by gjnl View Post
    Why is there no urine in the collection bag? http://www.vitalitymedical.com/external-catheter.html
    • The condom catheter might be twisted or dislodged, preventing proper flow of urine to the bag.
    • Tubing might be kinked or obstructed. Make sure to regularly inspect the tubing accessory.
    • The external catheter may be too tight. If this is the case, the pressure would obstruct the urethra, preventing urine to freely flow into the collection bag.
    • A vacuum can sometimes occur at the end of the condom catheter and can inhibit drainage. You can break the vacuum by briefly disconnecting the drainage device.


    Vacuum relief valve http://www.hollister.com/en/continen...inenceglossary


    A feature on Hollister Incorporated leg bag tubing, which helps prevent collapse of the tubing.


    Vented leg bag

    A special vacuum-relief mechanism featured on Hollister Incorporated oval kink-resistant tubing and the companion pouch, which also features an air vent. These combined features help to minimize a vacuum in the leg bag, as well as in the tubing. A vacuum is created as the urine cools outside the body. The vacuum may stall urine drainage through the tubing and/or prevent the leg bag from emptying completely.

    Drainage: http://www.caremedicalsource.com/blo...rnal-catheter/
    Urine must be able to flow freely from the catheter, through the tubing, and into the bag. Before use, bags should be pulled apart gently. Aspirating the bag eliminates positive vacuum pressure. Thus, once the tube is assembled, urine will flow freely to the bag.


    https://www.biorelief.com/product/co...leg-bag-system
    Vaccum Effect: Some men have an issue with the leg bag and urine is retaining in the tubing and the catheter is collapsing while on the penis. What is happening is a vacuum effect when the leg bag is drained. When the urine is draining it is pulling the air with it creating the vacuum effect. This collapses the catheter and will not allow all the urine to drain from the tubing and the bag will appear to be stuck together.

    An easy way to alleviate this is to first make sure that there is a small pocket of air in the collection bag before the bag is used for the first time of the day. This can be done by blowing into the tubing before inserting the catheter in it. Then when the bag is drained do not drain the entire amount from the bag. Leave a small amount of urine in the bag ( an ounce or so) and this will prevent the vacuum you may experience. It should not interfere with the operation of the bag, but it?s better to not have this.

    See Page 29 of this PDF: http://files.sld.cu/urologia-enferme...en_2008_lr.pdf
    Thanks for the info. Some things in the last paragraph I had not heard before.

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