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Thread: A warning re. Oybutynin I spotted in today's press...

  1. #11
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    Ohhhhhh Goddddd, help me! I am so sick of this shit!!!! What now???? Ditropan XL is THE only drug that works for my son!
    5 mg once per day. He's 33 yrs old and has been on this for 13 years! I'm not even going to tell him this! Anyone have any success with another drug? Thanks!

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Mombo View Post
    Ohhhhhh Goddddd, help me! I am so sick of this shit!!!! What now???? Ditropan XL is THE only drug that works for my son!
    5 mg once per day. He's 33 yrs old and has been on this for 13 years! I'm not even going to tell him this! Anyone have any success with another drug? Thanks!
    I used to take Ditropan XL but it quit working so I take Myrbetriq now. It's been 6 months since I've had major leaking (knock on wood).

  3. #13
    The smaller the dose the less chance. And 5 mg a day is a very low dose.
    Also, there is an increased chance per the research. NOT everyone is going to get it and personally I haven't seen any more dementia in this population. But if anyone has memory problems or starts to have concern, we switch them right away.
    A hamburger theoretically increases your chance of dementia caused by vascular issues!
    Not to make this unimportant but if you don't need it, don't take it or if one of the other meds will then try it. But if it keeping your bladder volume at 800 mls- which to me- you could probably take a lower dose but just my thought.
    And more research needs to be done!
    CWO
    CWO

  4. #14
    Senior Member Timaru's Avatar
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    The National Spinal Injuries Centre
    Bucks Healthcare NHS Trust
    Statement on the use of Oxybutynin and potential increased risk of dementia - March 2017
    Concern...s have been raised to staff within the National Spinal Injuries Unit by patients and their representatives following a publication in the Daily Mail on 27 Mar 2017.
    The article from the Daily Mail draws on information and discussions held at the 2017 European Association of Urology conference and a research article published in January 2015. (1-3)
    The advice from the National Spinal Injuries Centre is as follows:
    The National Spinal Injuries Centre does not recommend that spinal cord injured patients stop taking oxybutynin. If you are concerned about this issue, we advise to NOT stop taking your medication without speaking to a medical practitioner to decide which medicine would suit you best, considering how effective it is at managing symptoms, and whether there is a risk of unwanted side effects for you personally. This advice is also endorsed by Professor Marcus Drake, the urologist at University of Bristol who was quoted in the Daily Mail. (8)
    Stopping oxybutynin suddenly may lead to significant health problems including (6):
    - Silent kidney damage as a result of high bladder pressures
    - Autonomic dysreflexia (a life-threatening condition which can lead to sudden increase in blood pressure and other symptoms) in susceptible individuals
    - Urinary incontinence
    - Risk of catheter blockages
    - Urinary tract infections
    - Bladder irritation
    - Skin damage due to wetness
    The use of oxybutynin in spinal cord injured patients is specifically for the treatment of overactive neurogenic bladder, which is a specialised medical condition.
    Additional information:
    The research article quoted in the Daily Mail and published in 2015 (see reference 3) focused on the use of different medicines with “antimuscarinic/ anticholinergic” effects, including hayfever tablets and oxybutynin. Oxybutynin forms a small number of the prescriptions analysed in the paper. It suggested a possible link between patients who take high doses or long term antimuscarinic medicines and dementia, with oxybutynin listed as an example. However, that does not mean that oxybutynin will definitely cause dementia and there is lack of consensus about this evidence. (4)
    It is also worth noting that only adults of age > 65 years old participated in the study. The European Association of Urology conference paper in March 2017 (see reference 2) was focused on the increased number of prescriptions being written for oxybutynin within the USA rather than presenting any new data on any potential increased risk of dementia. (2) The majority of prescriptions for oxybutynin within the UK are prescribed for the treatment of overactive bladder within the general population and is recommended by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). (5)

  5. #15
    Out Urologists say Oxybutynin is better for SCI- and pretty inexpensive for the short acting. Trospium is a safer alternative. Mirgabetron is even better as it is not an anticholinergic but cost/? Get samples!
    CWO

  6. #16
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    This is a great thread and I, for one, am grateful for all the input. I am taking a deep breath and moving forward with this information. Megacolon was bad enough, but now dementia???? I just get so tired of it all.

  7. #17

  8. #18
    Botox bladder treatments gave me back a life.

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