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Thread: Hotel ADA Sinks

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by gjnl View Post
    It isn't always that easy. or that simple. Your abilities may allow you to be that sanguine. Others with differing abilities might be greatly burdened by inaccessible bathroom accommodations.
    Perhaps it is just my abilities making me sanguine as well, but I agree with Rock.

    Maybe those of us with hand function are better able to sort our problems out ourselves, we have to be adaptable when traveling (especially cheaply) - willing to sit on the floor of an inaccessible bathtub to shower, crawl into a bathroom with a door that isn't wide enough, crap into a grocery bag on the tent floor because the outdoors isn't accessible enough to have a toilet.

    The adaptation and improvisation we do may be a bit more physical.

    The adaptation and improvisation required when traveling solo as a quad I imagine requires a different sort of adaptation. Asking for help. Certainly much harder than the physical stuff, but the improvise, adapt and overcome philosophy still applies.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by funklab View Post
    Perhaps it is just my abilities making me sanguine as well, but I agree with Rock.

    Maybe those of us with hand function are better able to sort our problems out ourselves, we have to be adaptable when traveling (especially cheaply) - willing to sit on the floor of an inaccessible bathtub to shower, crawl into a bathroom with a door that isn't wide enough, crap into a grocery bag on the tent floor because the outdoors isn't accessible enough to have a toilet.

    The adaptation and improvisation we do may be a bit more physical.

    The adaptation and improvisation required when traveling solo as a quad I imagine requires a different sort of adaptation. Asking for help. Certainly much harder than the physical stuff, but the improvise, adapt and overcome philosophy still applies.
    You may be right, but fortunately, I don't have to travel on the cheap and I want to get what I pay for, demand and expect to make my travels with my wife an enjoyable experience for both of us.

    That said, I've stayed in 5 star luxury accommodations that have no better accommodations than way cheaper ones. So, my conclusion is, why not ask the questions and get the answers I need to make the decision about where I want to stay based upon the best accommodation for my abilities. NL really isn't a snob, but her idea of camping out is a Holiday Inn without a hot tub, just teasing! Whenever I get a chance to spoil the love of my life, I will give it my best shot. If you have a choice between 4 hotels and you can find one of them will accommodate you and your family the best, why wouldn't you go to that effort and ask the questions to get the best bang for your buck.

  3. #13
    Senior Member darty's Avatar
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    I agree 100% that no perfect hotel room exist, you would think they would build the ADA accessible rooms with all the correct requirements so even a quad with the least function could use it. That might be overkill for some but that's better than not being able to use it at all. When we travel we don't expect a perfect room and wing it most of the time. The only reason the hotels make any effort at all to make a room accessible is because they are required to by law.

    I have found that most times to get closer to the sink I need to remove my leg rest and drop my feet down then pull in farther. I usually put a large bath towel in my lap and put my razor, toothbrush, toothpaste and hair brush on that so I can easily reach them. I second the bed bath, washing my upper body at the sink and using the ice bucket to wash and rinse my hair.

    The bigger issue for me is bed height and as I understand it there is no requirement in the ADA for bed height. My chair does not raise and lower so most beds are too high for me to transfer into. When we drive I carry a small aluminum doorway ramp and a 36" wide 4 x 4 piece of wood. We place the wood near the head of the bed on the side I am getting in and out of and place (prop up) the ramp on the wood like you would in a doorway along side the bed. I am in a power chair so I back up the ramp along side the bed and it raises my rear wheels and seat up 4" so I can transfer out. In the morning we remove the ramp and it's down hill back into the chair.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mombo View Post
    We have stayed in many, many hotels and we never once thought about the sink. Roll in shower, toilet height and depth, bed height, etc. there have been times when my son had to roll up a bit side ways to the sink in order to use it. We usually put a bedroom chair in the bathroom with a tray on it to use for extra counter space. If we are doing a road trip,we take a fold up t.v. Tray that works in the bathroom IF the bathroom is large enough. We have found that the perfect hotel room does not exist for a wheelchair user. Some are way better than others, however we have learned to just roll with it. Wishing you the best of luck in your trip!
    ^^(A)^^

  4. #14
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    That's an awesome sink. I want one for my home. My biggest gripe with travel are hotel beds.
    T3-T7 complete since Sept 2015

  5. #15
    It would do my heart good to know that some organization is working on getting rid of those high beds in motels!!

    Not only unsafe for many disabled persons, but what about elderly non-disabled? My ability to travel into my senior years has been totally cut short. We have devised ramps, got a used power chair with riser feature, but it's all way too complicated and not what you want on a "vacation".
    Rant over.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by triumph View Post
    It would do my heart good to know that some organization is working on getting rid of those high beds in motels!!

    Not only unsafe for many disabled persons, but what about elderly non-disabled? My ability to travel into my senior years has been totally cut short. We have devised ramps, got a used power chair with riser feature, but it's all way too complicated and not what you want on a "vacation".
    Rant over.

    Would recommend that you communicate with both United Spinal Association, and with the PVA about your concerns. They have staff who are specifically gathering information about and communicating with people in Washington DC about this, although I would hazard a guess that the Access Board (which develops regulatory language related to the ADA) is among those agencies being currently decimated by the DT administration.

    (KLD)

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by triumph View Post
    It would do my heart good to know that some organization is working on getting rid of those high beds in motels!!

    Not only unsafe for many disabled persons, but what about elderly non-disabled? My ability to travel into my senior years has been totally cut short. We have devised ramps, got a used power chair with riser feature, but it's all way too complicated and not what you want on a "vacation".
    Rant over.
    Not sure what hotels your staying at but rarely a problem...make sure you know what your getting before you get there. Work with the managers have them text you pictures of the room, size, bathroom etc. If you have height requirements that make life more comfortable have them measure and see if they can adjust accordingly. If not try a different brand hotel.

    If you need help message me more then happy to help!

    Memories of a great and comfortable trip are priceless!

  8. #18
    Thanks for the comments!
    One of the last motels we stayed in was some years ago, a Caretel Inn. We had read comments about it having very accessible rooms, then saw a full page ad in one of the disability-related magazines we get. Made reservation and said we were 2 wheelers and need very accessible room. The room turned out to have high beds. Went to front desk and they told us they called the maintenance man, who would come and remove the bed frame, lowering the bed.
    We waited two hours, getting later in the evening, then managed to crawl/wobble/drag into bed. Maintenance never showed up, even after we called front desk a couple of times.
    Next morning called, then sent a letter to management. We were sent an apology and a voucher for a free night at any Caretel Inn. Surprisingly (?), we never used it.
    Most of our tour of the U.S. was in the 1970's before the appearance of "high beds". Then in the 80's and 90's we began to experience problems, even though we always called ahead. On some occasions we had them measure the bed height.
    Late 90's we purchased a trailer and had several modifications made, thus switching to camping instead of motels.
    Some of our more successful vacations were at St. Augustine Beach, and once when we lucked out and got a "party suite" that was huge and had a roll in shower, because the 'handicapped room' was already booked.

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