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Thread: Ultraportable toilet seat ideas?

  1. #11
    Senior Member Kulea's Avatar
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    You can always make your own leg set out of PVC or aluminum pipe. Just make one side shorter than the other and they will fold completely flat.

    Or, you can make a frame that disassembles to even more compact. When assembled correctly, drill holes through the elbow and pipe. Now, whenever you assemble, you can slide a long cotter pin (or bolt) through the holes to secure the frame while using. And remember the spring clips on the toilet seat also can be used to stabilize some re-assembled frame.

    Or, you can get one of those pre-made X-frames and cut it in half. Find some well fitting sleeves (like those leg extensions) to widen the legset. Disassemble for packing and bolt the sleeve on after you arrive. Or, use those spring pins (the kind used in adjustable legs) for quick assembly. If that sleeve is wider than the toilet seat, you can hinge the seat. When you clip it to the sleeve, the seat will become rigid (you might need 4 clips, 2 in either side of the hinge).
    Last edited by Kulea; 02-14-2017 at 06:55 PM.
    C-6/7 incomplete

  2. #12
    Senior Member Kulea's Avatar
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    OK, so here's what I mean. Get the frame seat and measure the distance X of the sling. This distance must be kept fairly precise otherwise the seat won't be level.

    Now remove the upholstery and cut the frame in half.

    Now you need to find some pipe to serve as a sleeve. It could be PVC or aluminum or lightweight steel, it just needs to slide over the frame fairly snuggly. Then cut the sleeves and mount to the bottom of the toilet seat with 8 spring clips. Make sure the sleeves are separated by that same distance X.

    Now you can slide the frame into the sleeves.

    Once it is all assembled, drill holes from the underside through both the sleeve and frame pipes, near the end of the frame pipe (you won't be able to see the end, so you will have to measure where it is). You need to mark all the parts so you can reassemble it the same way each time. Then remove the frame and put spring pin inserts into ends.

    You should probably drill each hole and add the spring pin before moving on to the next hole. This will keep everything aligned while you are drilling. When you are done, you can cut the seat in half if you want.

    I don't think you will even need a hinge. If the spring clips are strong enough, everything will stay fairly secure. This should disassemble into a fairly compact package. If you want it even shorter, cut off the bottom of the frames and add leg extensions using the same sleeves and spring pins. If you don't keep the legs the same length that they were, then you might have to play around a little with the front/back lengths in order to make the seat level. This is also a good method if you couldn't maintain that distance X. Now you can take the leg extensions off, and nothing will be too long or wide.
    Last edited by Kulea; 02-14-2017 at 10:18 PM.
    C-6/7 incomplete

  3. #13
    Senior Member Kulea's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lyuba View Post
    Hi. A friend of mine has a folding 3-in-1 commode toilet and she is very much satisfied with it.

    She told me it's really portable. I asked where she bought it for you. Here - https://beatmed.com/folding-3-in-1-c...27a0c99bff6710 The delivery is very fast, like 4 days or something.

    I hope this helps
    That type of commode is definitely nice and inexpensive, but I doubt it is going to fit in luggage, or in an overhead bin.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zKXNTIK9q7Q
    C-6/7 incomplete

  4. #14
    Senior Member Kulea's Avatar
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    Since I can't edit a prior comment, I am reposting it with good picture links.

    Get the frame seat and measure the distance X of the sling. This distance must be kept fairly precise otherwise the seat won't be level.

    Now remove the upholstery and cut the frame in half.

    Now you need to find some pipe to serve as a sleeve. It could be PVC or aluminum or lightweight steel, it just needs to slide over the frame fairly snuggly. Then cut the sleeves and mount to the bottom of the toilet seat with 8 spring clips. Make sure the sleeves are separated by that same distance X.

    Now you can slide the frame into the sleeves.

    Once it is all assembled, drill holes from the underside through both the sleeve and frame pipes, near the end of the frame pipe (you won't be able to see the end, so you will have to measure where it is). You need to mark all the parts so you can reassemble it the same way each time. Then remove the frame and put spring pin inserts into ends.

    You should probably drill each hole and add the spring pin before moving on to the next hole. This will keep everything aligned while you are drilling. When you are done, you can cut the seat in half if you want.

    I don't think you will even need a hinge. If the spring clips are strong enough, everything will stay fairly secure. This should disassemble into a fairly compact package. If you want it even shorter, cut off the bottom of the frames and add leg extensions using the same sleeves and spring pins. If you don't keep the legs the same length that they were, then you might have to play around a little with the front/back lengths in order to make the seat level. This is also a good method if you couldn't maintain that distance X. Now you can take the leg extensions off, and nothing will be too long or wide.
    Last edited by Kulea; 03-11-2017 at 07:23 PM.
    C-6/7 incomplete

  5. #15
    Thanks Kulea, this is the kind of out of the box stuff I was hoping for, I see one major flaw with your idea above (maybe two).

    First and least importantly I'm not sure it would be easy to find a fold out stool that was high enough to fit over and wide enough to fit around most toilets, although the width wouldn't really matter I guess because you're bridging it with the PVC sleeves.

    Second and more crucially, this...

    wouldn't work because the lower sleeve (and presumably the frame of the stool which would go through it) blocks off the crucial area where I need to sneak my hand up under my butt. The whole point of that cutout part of the cushion is for access.

    The obvious answer to this would be to cut out that part of the sleeve, and if need be cut back the arms of the metal frame that would extend into the gap, but I think the stability of the whole contraption would be compromised at that point and there probably wouldn't be enough structural integrity to support my weight on that side (especially since I end up leaning to that side often while doing my business).

  6. #16
    A top idea and resolution Kulea. I am lucky (well maybe) in that I can and prefer to shite sitting on the porcelain.
    Sitting with the legs swinging in the air is not ideal. It is more natural to squat and if I could squat and crap I would

    Good point on that shortcoming funklab.
    Perhaps this might overcome that and allow access? It is just a rough and ready sketch in paint but you get the idea.
    It can be located as Kulea showed in his image; this way it will swing down and away when in use so allowing access; and be able to pivot for packing flat.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by slow_runner; 03-11-2017 at 09:37 PM.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by slow_runner View Post
    A top idea and resolution Kulea. I am lucky (well maybe) in that I can and prefer to shite sitting on the porcelain.
    Sitting with the legs swinging in the air is not ideal. It is more natural to squat and if I could squat and crap I would

    Good point on that shortcoming funklab.
    Perhaps this might overcome that and allow access? It is just a rough and ready sketch in paint but you get the idea.
    It can be located as Kulea showed in his image; this way it will swing down and away when in use so allowing access; and be able to pivot for packing flat.
    Thanks for helping to trouble shoot this problem, but I don't think that would work either. If the above drawing is of the sleeve, there would be no metal support (and thus no need for a sleeve) in that section. If it the sleeve were PVC of some kind I think it would still be a pretty weak way of holding the chair together on that end.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Kulea's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by funklab View Post
    First and least importantly I'm not sure it would be easy to find a fold out stool that was high enough to fit over ... most toilets
    You can easily use the same sleeve material to make leg extensions to increase the height. Leg extensions can be removed, which keeps the thing compact.

    I agree with slow_runner that you can fabricate sleeves that can get out of the way. These sleeves would have to have much more rigidity than PVC, however, and having them fabricated will greatly increase the cost. If you didn't have to split the seat in two, there definitely are simple design changes that will work and keep the gap open without this kind of costly fabrication. For instance, the sleeve can cross well below the seat (just above the toilet rim) and risers can be added to the sleeve to support the seat.

    Another option is to build a U-frame rather than an X-frame. You can make a U-frame that folds and is very low, so when folded, it is compact. It would have a spreader across the back of the toilet rim for rigidity. And, it would have removable legs for height and the seat would snap to it. I have built both X-frames and U-frames for commodes out of PVC, but that material is really too bulky and heavy for your purposes. Premade aluminum X-frames are readily available (as in the camping stool above). U-frames pretty much have to be custom built if you want them compact.

    BTW - where do you locate the gap when you are sitting on the seat? It sounds like you use it in the rear.
    C-6/7 incomplete

  9. #19
    Another rough and ready drawing for you funklab.
    I think it would work. You would need to cut the top insert tube short. The spring latches would still fulfill their function.
    PVC would be a recipe for an interesting journey. A plumber or other would be able to bend up some suitable tube to suit.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  10. #20
    Okay, I think I have come up with a reasonable solution that will get it down into a pretty compact package (roughly 18" x 8" x 5" package which should fit into a carry on pretty easy).

    It's gonna be expensive though, because the first step is to buy another toilet seat for a ridiculous $300 with shipping (smh), like this one, which is the one I currently use:

    http://www.sportaid.com/activeaid-ra...ilet-seat.html


    First step, cut here like Kulea suggested.


    I imagine there is some sort of paint on or spray on rubberized product I can use to make the cut part water tight.
    The bottom of this cushion is about 1 cm of particle board that I will screw two hinges into. Two hinges because that way they can straddle the support pipe underneath to secure the cushion from moving left and right without any further attachements.


    Step two. Cut the underlying frame in the same place. This will leave me two disconnected halves of the frame. I will trim a total of 10 cm (5 cm from the midline) to shorten the length of this crossbar to approximately the same length as the stubby cross bars that lie underneath the sides of frame supporting the cutout side of the toilet cushion (this is confusing to say in words, but basically there is a small cross bar about 12 cm in length underneath each of the pieces in the bottom corners of Kulea's picture above.

    Step 3, I will get a piece of pipe that fits snugly around the now cut side of the frame to bridge the gap. This will be approximately 20 cm long and will allow the frame to be both a little shorter and a little wider than stock as needed simply by pushing the two halves of the frame further inside the sleeve or pulling them out a bit. If the sleeve pipe is fit snugly enough I don't think I will need anything extra to hold it together.

    This way I am only adding two hinges and a 20 cm sleeve pipe to the overall package.

    By my calculations, the now hinged cushion should be about 20 cm x 40 cm x 15 cm not counting the cutout space. The two pieces of the upper frame will fit pretty snugly around the cushion package with no extra projections. It's hard to see in the photo, but the four legs of this contraption are held in place with pins and can easily be slid off. They are about 38 cm each and so will fit snugly along the long side of the rest of the package with the extra 20 cm piece.

    This will take up the bulk of a carryon bag, but I can get it in, and as long as I wear any cold weather clothing and my second item is a bag that fits under the seat in front of me (which is usually what I bring in addition to my bulky suitcase right now), then I should be legal for any domestic flight and save myself $50 a trip plus the hassle of finding where baggage claim is and hoping that nobody swiped my bag when the carosel stopped because there's no way I get there quickly since I'm last off the plane and generally head straight to the toilet afterwards.

    Now I just gotta get myself a hacksaw, some kind of rubberizer, two hinges and a few screws... and cough up the money to these bastards for another overpriced piece of tubular steel.

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