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Thread: Asterias? embryonic stem cell therapy linked to sustained improvements in motor funct

  1. #1

    Thumbs up Asterias? embryonic stem cell therapy linked to sustained improvements in motor funct

    excellent news!!!!!!!!

    http://www.fiercebiotech.com/biotech...function-small



    Asterias Biotherapeutics has posted data from a phase 1/2a trial of its embryonic stem cell-based therapy. After six months, motor levels of all five evaluable patients who received a 10-million-cell dose have improved.
    Fremont, California-based Asterias gave the 10-million-cell dose to six patients with cervical spinal cord injuries, five of whom have completed at least six months of follow-up. All five of the patients saw their motor level rise by at least one grade, on at least one side, against the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury scale. The score of one of the five went up two levels on both sides. Another experienced a two-notch increase but only on one side. Patients? Upper Extremity Motor Scores improved, too.
    If the improvements are attributable to the therapy, the data suggest AST-OPC1 cells improve motor function in patients with the most severe form of spinal injury. The data also reveal a clean safety profile, with Asterias reporting no serious adverse events.
    ?The results to date in the 10 million cell cohort treated with AST-OPC1 cells show that the ..............

  2. #2
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    I ran across this today as well. It's a couple months old but still...
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iZ2ycm21CwA

  3. #3
    It's a sub-acute therapy (OPC's). They started injecting their patients with 20 million cells back in October.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GRAMMY View Post
    It's a sub-acute therapy (OPC's). They started injecting their patients with 20 million cells back in October.
    Correct me if I'm wrong but the two guys in the video were at 10 million correct?

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by #LHB# View Post
    Correct me if I'm wrong but the two guys in the video were at 10 million correct?
    I think so. I don't believe much info has been put out about their sub-acute 20 million. This isn't a chronic therapy however. These are OPC.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GRAMMY View Post
    I think so. I don't believe much info has been put out about their sub-acute 20 million. This isn't a chronic therapy however. These are OPC.
    Yea I knew they where acute but you still gotta be happy for the patients. May not help me but I'm glad it has helped them.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by #LHB# View Post
    Yea I knew they where acute but you still gotta be happy for the patients. May not help me but I'm glad it has helped them.
    Sorry to be a stickler, but these OPC don't work well in the acute injury either. They're performing best after the acute phase has calmed down but not well if one waits too long going into the chronic stage. I'm with you too on hoping this therapy will help!

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    I hope they do Chronic soon.

  9. #9
    Senior Member lunasicc42's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparky831 View Post
    I hope they do Chronic soon.

    I am not under the impression that this company even has interest in developing a chronic therapy...not against an Acute therapy, Juss sayin
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  10. #10
    Asterias Biotherapeutics Inc., a California-based biotechnology company pioneering the field of regenerative medicine, announced on June 13 that new nine-month follow-up data show improved arm, hand and finger function in study participants with complete (AIS-A) cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) who received the company's treatment called AST-OPC1 (oligodendrocyte progenitor cells derived from federally approved stem cell lines). The study's eligibility criteria limit participation to people who are newly injured because AST-OPC1 must be administered between 14 and 30 days following injury.
    In addition, the study – called SCiStar – shows that three of the six patients who received a 10-million-cell dose of AST-OPC1 in the Phase 1/2a clinical trial have now recovered two levels of motor function. And previously announced improvements in arm, hand and finger function at three months and six months following administration of AST-OPC1 have been confirmed and further increased at nine months. The study is being conducted at six U.S. facilities, including Shepherd Center, and the company plans to increase this to up to 12 sites to accommodate expanded patient enrollment.
    “The new efficacy results show that previously reported meaningful improvements in arm, hand and finger function in the 10-million-cell cohort treated with AST-OPC1 cells have been maintained and in some patients have been further enhanced even nine months following dosing,” said Edward Wirth III, M.D., chief medical officer at Asterias. “Gains in motor function, such as the improvements observed in the SCiStar study to date, have been shown to increase a patient’s ability to function independently following complete cervical spinal cord injuries. We are increasingly encouraged by these continued positive results, which are remarkable compared with spontaneous recovery rates observed in a closely matched untreated patient population.”
    Jane S. Lebkowski, Ph.D., Asterias’ president of research and development and its chief scientific officer, presented the nine-month efficacy and safety data on the AIS-A 10-million-cell cohort on June 13 during the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) 2017 Annual Meeting held in Boston, Mass. Her slide presentation is available here.
    Nine-Month Follow-up Results
    Improvements in upper-extremity motor function are being measured using the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI) scale, widely used to quantify functional status of patients with spinal cord injuries. Both research participants and physicians consistently report that improvements in upper-extremity motor function are the most desirable functional improvement target in people with quadriplegia, as even relatively modest changes can have a significant impact on functional independence, quality of life and cost of care.
    The SCiStar study is monitoring two separate ISNCSCI measurements of upper-extremity motor function. The upper-extremity motor score (UEMS) is a linear scale used to quantify motor function at each of five upper-extremity muscle groups driving arm and hand function; these scores are also used to determine "motor levels," which define the level within the spinal cord above which a research participant has normal function. As suggested by existing research, patients with severe spinal cord injury who show two motor levels of improvement on at least one side may regain the ability to perform daily activities, such as feeding, dressing and bathing. This ability significantly reduces the overall level of daily assistance needed for the patient and associated healthcare costs.
    Six patients were enrolled and dosed in the AIS-A 10-million-cell cohort, with five of six patients completing a nine-month follow-up visit. The results include the following highlights:
    Motor Level Improvement – Additional motor level improvement was seen in the AIS-A 10-million-cell cohort at nine months.
    • Three of six patients (50 percent) achieved two motor levels of improvement over baseline on at least one side as of their latest follow-up visit through nine months. This compares to two of six patients (33 percent) who had improved two motor levels on at least one side through three and six months of follow-up.
    • In addition, all six patients (100 percent) achieved at least one motor level of improvement on at least one side as of their latest follow-up through nine months.
    Upper-Extremity Motor Score – Additional improvement in the average UEMS score for this cohort was observed at nine months. The average UEMS improvement at nine months was 11.2 points, compared to 9.7 points at six months.
    Matched Historical Control Data – The nine-month results show a meaningful improvement in the motor function recovery in the AIS-A patients receiving 10 million AST-OPC1 cells compared to a historical control group of 62 closely matched patients from the EMSCI database. In the historical matched control, 29 percent of patients recovered two motor levels on at least one side 12 months after baseline compared to the 50 percent of the AIS-A patients receiving AST-OPC1 who have recovered two motor levels on at least one side nine months after baseline.
    Safety – The trial results to date continue to indicate a positive safety profile for AST-OPC1. There have been no serious adverse events related to AST-OPC1, and data from the study indicate that AST-OPC1 can be safely administered to patients in the subacute period after severe cervical spinal cord injury.
    As previously reported, Asterias will report 12-month efficacy and safety data from the AIS-A 10-million-cell cohort sometime late in the third quarter of 2017 after the 12-month results are collected for the entire cohort.
    Each year in the United States, more than 17,000 people sustain a severe, debilitating spinal cord injury. These injuries can be devastating to quality of life and ability to function independently. Lifetime healthcare costs for these patients can often approach $5 million. Improvements in arm, hand and finger functional capabilities in these patients can result in lower healthcare costs, significant improvements in quality of life, increased ability to engage in activities of daily living and increased independence.
    About the SCiStar Trial
    The SCiStar trial is an open-label, single-arm trial testing three sequential escalating doses of AST-OPC1 administered at up to 20 million AST-OPC1 cells in as many as 35 patients with sub-acute, C-5 to C-7, motor complete (AIS-A or AIS-B) cervical SCI. These individuals have essentially lost all movement below their injury site and experience severe paralysis of the upper and lower limbs. AIS-A patients have lost all motor and sensory function below their injury site, while AIS-B patients have lost all motor function but may retain some minimal sensory function below their injury site. AST-OPC1 is being administered 14 to 30 days post-injury. Patients will be followed by neurological exams and imaging procedures to assess the safety and activity of the product.
    The study is being conducted at six U.S. centers, and the company plans to increase this to up to 12 sites to accommodate the expanded patient enrollment. Clinical sites involved in the study are the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, Shepherd Center in Atlanta, University of Southern California (USC) jointly with Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center in Los Angeles, Indiana University, Rush University Medical Center in Chicago and Santa Clara Valley Medical Center in San Jose, jointly with Stanford University.

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