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Thread: Taming high gas bills

  1. #1

    Taming high gas bills

    Two part question:

    (1) Is it normal to want the indoor temperature to be as high as 74?? I get really cold when the temperature is below 70?.

    (2) Does anyone else have a problem with very large gas bills? I'm guessing this is due to how hot I keep the home.

  2. #2
    Yes, it is common for people with SCI/D to feel the cold more, and to need to keep the heat higher in the winter than an AB might need.

    Not sure where you live, but in CA at least, there is a program where you can apply for special rates for utilities if you need to run medical equipment or for management of medical conditions. It helps a little. You have to have your provider sign a form that you get from the utility company. "Medical Equipment" can include electric powered hospital beds, powered mattress systems (such as low air-loss mattresses) and even the need to charge power wheelchairs, and if either heat or air conditioning is indicated as medically necessary by the provider, includes this too.

    (KLD)

  3. #3
    Senior Member Vintage's Avatar
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    Texas had a lower rate for people on food stamps for many years. That discount was discontinued a few months ago, causing my electric bill to almost double, since my house is 'all electric'.
    Female, T9 incomplete

  4. #4
    Try some of the base layer underwear from Helly Hansen, UnderArmour, REI, Cabela's etc. These base layers aren't the long, bulky underwear of old. These are light weight, fit snugly (no wrinkes), and wick moisture. You can get long or capri length pants and long sleeve crew neck tops. Wear them under your jeans, wool pants, and sweaters, Also try a fleece vest layer over your clothing.

  5. #5
    Check around for programs in your state that will do an energy audit on your house and even possibly come in and do some air sealing and added insulation. Air sealing (especially) and added insulation will pay for itself in a very short time.

  6. #6
    Yea, I'm the same. I keep it at 74 when I'm home and turn it down when I'm away. I'd like to keep it at 70 but I get cold.

  7. #7
    Here are the Pacific Gas and Electric Medical Baseline Assistance Program extra allowances for Electricity and Natural Gas:

    Electricity:
    If you are a residential customer, you are assigned a Baseline quantity. This quantity
    is the number of kilowatt-hours (kWh) of electricity you may purchase at PG&E's
    lowest residential rate.
    If you or a full-time resident in your home has a medical disability, you may qualify for
    a Standard Medical Baseline Quantity in addition to your regular Baseline quantity.
    The Standard Medical Baseline Quantity is 16.
    438 kWh per day (approximately) year-
    round. In other words, you may be able to purchase an additional 16.438 kWh of
    electricity per day (the equivalent of 500 kWh per month) at a lower rate. The
    Standard Medical Baseline Quantity used for automated billing is calculated using the
    unrounded quotient of the following equation: 6,000 kWh per year divided by 365
    days. Any billing that requires hand calculations will use 16.438 kWh per day.

    Natural Gas:
    If you are a residential customer, you are assigned a Baseline quantity. This
    quantity is the number of therms of gas you may purchase at PG&E's lowest
    residential rate.
    If you or a full-time resident in your home has a medical disability, you may qualify
    for a Standard Medical Baseline Quantity in addition to your regular Baseline
    quantity. The Standard Medical Baseline Quantity is 0.82192 therms per day year-
    round. In other words, you may be able to purchase an additional 0.82192 therms of
    gas per day (the equivalent of 25 therms per month) at a lower rate. The Standard
    Medical Baseline Quantity used for automated billing is calculated using the
    unrounded quotient of the following equation: 300 therms per year divided by 365
    days. Any billing that requires hand calculations will use 0.82192 therms per day.

  8. #8
    Senior Member CapnGimp's Avatar
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    Ever since I woke up from a coma and discovered I was paralyzed some 20 years ago, I have been cold. Layer up on shirts, like gjnl said. I use long sleeve moisture-wicking(can't sweat below injury anyway) type shirts under everything until its over mid 70s. Drink hot water or ginger root tea around the clock and I have a wood stove beside my bed to heat my house(I live in a basement). I keep it about 80 all winter, never below about 74.
    I only keep my trunk warm as I can't tell my lower body is cold until I lay flat and the blood gets up to where I can feel, seriously. MY legs can be cold as ice outside and as long as my trunk is warm, all is good...get in bed and my teeth start chattering until I get warm lol. Layering and hot fluids are your friend.

  9. #9
    Senior Member lynnifer's Avatar
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    Same issue here. Trying to keep mine at 20?C this winter but damn that's cold when the windchill is -18?C outside! I wear a blanket around and a hat - that makes a difference ... I used to keep mine at 24 but it's just too much money, especially now that we have a 'carbon tax' in Canada. I pay $25 JUST FOR DELIVERY.
    Make America Sane Again. lol

    T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

  10. #10
    Senior Member Andy's Avatar
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    My place is at 76F, and the gas bills get interesting for sure, especially when under 10F for like a month as in previous years and the boiler is going on like every 20 minutes, lol. But as it is a multiunit place on one steam system, I look at it just as an overhead cost (I get the rent money), and the bulk of that is tax deductible.

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