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Thread: Eating egg yolk is almost as bad as smoking when it comes to coronary artery disease

  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by slow_runner View Post

    or try this lot in the U.S --- no tails in either.
    http://www.dubpies.com/
    Even though this is from the country that find Vegemite food, I ordered a couple of Dub's pies to check it out. I like to experience new food.

    Does it require backing evidence to accept that nutritious food has beneficial bacteria?
    And that presents another question; what, that is presented as food, is nutritious?

    Well in this case yes. Its milk from another species designed to provide nourishment to baby cows not humans. Would you drink a big glass of rat's milk without some evidence that is wasn't harmful?

    As for what is nutritious, there is of course the food pyramid:


  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by t8burst View Post
    Even though this is from the country that find Vegemite food, I ordered a couple of Dub's pies to check it out. I like to experience new food.
    I will educate you on the parochial; VEGEMITE= made across the ditch in Australia, MARMITE= made here in New Zealand, also in the UK.
    I did prefer Marmite before my stay at the spinal unit, now I prefer Vegemite and it is my source of vitamin B as is the Brewers Yeast I have on my meals at times.

    Quote Originally Posted by t8burst View Post
    Would you drink a big glass of rat's milk without some evidence that is wasn't harmful?
    As for what is nutritious, there is of course the food pyramid:

    I am not sure if you are being facetious or it is your humour?

    A big glass of rats milk? Well, that would all depend on the environment and diet of the rat.
    Nutritious? I am sure that it would be.
    Given the time restraints and I imagine it would be a tedious exercise, the question arises; how many lactating rats would I require to fill a standard 8oz glass?

    Anyway, in keeping with the thread subject, I am off to have a breakfast of pan fried smoked ham on home made wholemeal bread (toasted, with real butter), onion relish and two fried eggs cooked in ham lard.
    Now, that is a nutritious meal
    Last edited by slow_runner; 12-28-2016 at 04:24 PM.

  3. #33
    Senior Member Vintage's Avatar
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    "Anyway, in keeping with the thread subject, I am off to have a breakfast of pan fried smoked ham on home made wholemeal bread (toasted, with real butter), onion relish and two fried eggs cooked in ham lard.
    Now, that is a nutritious meal. - - slow-runner"

    Having been on a forum with Aussies and their close 'cousins', I read about vegimite and marmite. And, having had a German granny, I knew the wisdom of brewer's yeast. So, when I went to a common, American grocery store and saw a darling little bottle of marmite up on a top shelf, I gave it a new home.

    Your breakfast sounds delicious and nutritious. But, what is 'onion relish'?
    Female, T9 incomplete

  4. #34
    Breakfast is sometimes my main meal.
    Good for you on the Marmite find V; brewers yeast is quite nice sprinkled on savoury dishes too.
    It is Whitlocks Caramelised Onion that I was referring to. Basically sauteed onion with mustard seed and balsamic vinegar, it's easy enough to make the home-made version but my wife prefers this particular brand.
    So who would argue??
    I don't swallow the 'fat is bad, oil is good' mantra. Excess is bad.
    IMO few oils are healthy for cooking. A few are good for seasoning cast iron though, others are nice cold on salads and breads. Coconut oil is marvelous for the skin and hair.
    Fats are nutritious and lard is what I use. Rendered down in the kitchen from fat sourced from my friendly butcher.
    The remnants are used for supplement feeding the dog or some is fined and frozen to be sprinkled on pizza or added to some food dishes. There is no waste.
    Last edited by slow_runner; 12-28-2016 at 06:13 PM.

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by slow_runner View Post
    I will educate you on the parochial; VEGEMITE= made across the ditch in Australia, MARMITE= made here in New Zealand, also in the UK.
    I did prefer Marmite before my stay at the spinal unit, now I prefer Vegemite and it is my source of vitamin B as is the Brewers Yeast I have on my meals at times.
    I thought New Zealand was part of Australia likie Tasmania. Learn something new every day!

    I am not sure if you are being facetious or it is your humour?
    Dr. Nick is my nutritional guru!

    A big glass of rats milk? Well, that would all depend on the environment and diet of the rat.
    Nutritious? I am sure that it would be.
    Given the time restraints and I imagine it would be a tedious exercise, the question arises; how many lactating rats would I require to fill a standard 8oz glass?
    Right your are! In fact it has more protein than cow juice: http://www.vegsource.com/j-morris-hi...ur-answer.html

  6. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by t8burst View Post
    Right your are! In fact it has more protein than cow juice: http://www.vegsource.com/j-morris-hi...ur-answer.html
    Bingo! Thanks
    I have sourced a few does and one lucky buck and have begun a breeding program for my select herd of milking rats.
    Will the neighbours be pleased to hear of my agrarian pursuit???? I might keep it quiet for the moment.

  7. #37
    Senior Member Vintage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by slow_runner View Post
    Breakfast is sometimes my main meal.
    Good for you on the Marmite find V; brewers yeast is quite nice sprinkled on savoury dishes too.
    It is Whitlocks Caramelised Onion that I was referring to. Basically sauteed onion with mustard seed and balsamic vinegar, it's easy enough to make the home-made version but my wife prefers this particular brand.
    So who would argue??
    I don't swallow the 'fat is bad, oil is good' mantra. Excess is bad.
    IMO few oils are healthy for cooking. A few are good for seasoning cast iron though, others are nice cold on salads and breads. Coconut oil is marvelous for the skin and hair.
    Fats are nutritious and lard is what I use. Rendered down in the kitchen from fat sourced from my friendly butcher.
    The remnants are used for supplement feeding the dog or some is fined and frozen to be sprinkled on pizza or added to some food dishes. There is no waste.
    So, again I find myself futilly jabbing around for the non-existant "like" button, and have to quote your entire post instead.
    Female, T9 incomplete

  8. #38
    Senior Member Vintage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by slow_runner View Post
    Breakfast is sometimes my main meal.
    Good for you on the Marmite find V; brewers yeast is quite nice sprinkled on savoury dishes too.
    It is Whitlocks Caramelised Onion that I was referring to. Basically sauteed onion with mustard seed and balsamic vinegar, it's easy enough to make the home-made version but my wife prefers this particular brand.
    So who would argue??
    I don't swallow the 'fat is bad, oil is good' mantra. Excess is bad.
    IMO few oils are healthy for cooking. A few are good for seasoning cast iron though, others are nice cold on salads and breads. Coconut oil is marvelous for the skin and hair.
    Fats are nutritious and lard is what I use. Rendered down in the kitchen from fat sourced from my friendly butcher.
    The remnants are used for supplement feeding the dog or some is fined and frozen to be sprinkled on pizza or added to some food dishes. There is no waste.
    So, again I find myself futilly jabbing around for the non-existant "like" button, and have to quote your entire post instead.

    I found this great link on rendering lard.

    http://www.myhumblekitchen.com/2011/...way-snow-white
    HOW TO RENDER LARD THE RIGHT WAY
    (SNOW WHITE, ODORLESS)

    But what do you mean by "fined and frozen"?

    I rendered a lot of lard once and made soap out if it. I could have used some info like the link I just now found.
    Female, T9 incomplete

  9. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by Vintage View Post
    So, again I find myself futilly jabbing around for the non-existant "like" button, and have to quote your entire post instead.
    Oh no, not the like button. That brings to mind the FaceMud (FB ) which I cannot be bothered with.
    If I wish to speak with friends I call them up or visit - AND then we do have things to discuss rather than regurgitate the FB carry-on
    I shall climb down off my soapbox now.

    I think that we do have similar outlooks on these health matters and I am sure there are others who think in a similar vein; we are not alone.

    Quote Originally Posted by Vintage View Post
    I found this great link on rendering lard.

    www.myhumblekitchen.com/2011/02/how-render-lard-the-right-way-snow-white
    HOW TO RENDER LARD THE RIGHT WAY
    (SNOW WHITE, ODORLESS)
    I shall read through later. At the moment I am watching the very informative and interesting lecture by Dr. Walter J. Veith https://amazingdiscoveries.tv/media/...derly-amazing/ from the link provided by t8burst, who is fast becoming a friend. I may even convert from political agnostic to the Libertarianism ethos.
    No, just kidding on that option.

    Quote Originally Posted by Vintage View Post
    But what do you mean by "fined and frozen"?
    The crackling that is sieved out from the render, is left to drain **, then when cool is put through the processor (slow) and packed in ziplock bag/s then stored in the freezer. It is easy to grab a handful or such when needed. I suppose it is still nutritious; it is certainly tasty.
    ** Sometimes I will spread it on the roasting tray and cook it on a bit further if i believe it needs the extra.

    Quote Originally Posted by Vintage View Post
    I rendered a lot of lard once and made soap out if it. I could have used some info like the link I just now found.
    That is interesting, milk from lard. I imagine it is very odour neautral.
    I source unscented goats milk soap from a crowd in the South Island ( no scunge); that is the island south of the North Island and slightly north of Stewart Island
    Last edited by slow_runner; 12-28-2016 at 10:30 PM.

  10. #40
    This is an example of why one takes advice from the experts with a grain of salt!

    C5/C6

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