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Thread: Rice scientists develop Texas-PEG to help knit severed, damaged spinal cords

  1. #1

    Thumbs up Rice scientists develop Texas-PEG to help knit severed, damaged spinal cords

    The combination of graphene nanoribbons made with a process developed at Rice University and a common polymer could someday be of critical importance to healing damaged spinal cords in people, according to Rice chemist James Tour. The Tour lab has spent a decade working with graphene nanoribbons, starting with the discovery of a chemical process to "unzip" them from multi-walled carbon nanotubes, as revealed in a Nature paper in 2009.

    Article LINKS

  2. #2
    It was awesome seeing the video of the rat
    I was injured 2 weeks after my 16th birthday on June 14th, 2004. My level of injury is C5 complete, but I can move my wrist.

    My screen name comes from the movie The Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind

  3. #3
    I think this is unbelievable. It is the fusion of the spinal cord. I compare it to how the skin heals itself after a stiching it or after a cut. With a little help it does a fusion. I hope I am not exaggerating but this is revolutionary but as we have seen before this is in the rat stage (video is great) and it usually takes 10 years to get into the market but there are some exciting things going on lately with Asterias and now this. Hopefully we hear great things from W2W. Thank you Grammy.

  4. #4
    The video is quite impressive, but I still want to see the data. My response from a duplicate thread...

    The study they cite was an animal study in which rats had their spinal cords surgically transected, then during the same surgery, they implanted these PEG-GNRs. They saw signs of sensory function return 24 hours after the surgery, and while the news article mentions "almost perfect motor control", the study abstract linked in the article mentions no such thing.

    An interesting finding with some potential? Perhaps. But this is only a transection model, which is just one type of SCI, and they implanted the PEG-GNRs literally at the same time they injured the mice...which is about as acute as you can get. I personally don't find anything exciting about these results.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by scimike View Post
    I think this is unbelievable. It is the fusion of the spinal cord. I compare it to how the skin heals itself after a stiching it or after a cut. With a little help it does a fusion. I hope I am not exaggerating but this is revolutionary but as we have seen before this is in the rat stage (video is great) and it usually takes 10 years to get into the market but there are some exciting things going on lately with Asterias and now this. Hopefully we hear great things from W2W. Thank you Grammy.
    As Tomsonite has pointed out, this group did a fast transection model surgery. They'll have a lot more work to do in the future to see if their carbon nonotubes will make a difference in other highly relevant SCI models. We'll have to wait and see how their future studies pan out.

  6. #6
    Some of us 12 years post approaching 50 don't really see the light at the end of the tunnel getting brighter. More than likely before this can get out of the lab, there will be a new super glue discovered or developed. Those waiting for incremental improvements, that would be happy to get back hands or off a respirator, won't be helped. Seems there's enough money for research or trials, not both. So the money goes to the next better research never fully exploring if previous research would provide an incremental improvement. The wheel keeps turning.
    please . . .test what you already know; and give us what you have. we may not be dying, but we certainly are not living either

  7. #7
    Grammy, thank you. I get excited and rush reading through it fast sometimes. I said like " this is it" but I've come down now.

  8. #8
    you have a point. This was an old technology and they only started to use it after head body transfer talk:

    Despite the properties of PEG having been discovered in 1986, very little work has been published over the subsequent 30 years.[ 5 11 ] Acute transections in man being rare, no group pursued a clinical application of this technology. A head-body transplant and the need for an accelerated spinal cord fusion protocol resurrected these older studies.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by scimike View Post
    Grammy, thank you. I get excited and rush reading through it fast sometimes. I said like " this is it" but I've come down now.
    I guess what picked my interest in the work was the fact this research wasn't done in one of the usual SCI labs. The authors work in the Department of Chemistry, the Nano-Carbon Center and Department of Material Science and Nano-engineering at Rice University, Houston, Texas. LINK I just found it interesting and thought I'd share it since not much is being posted in the forum lately.

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