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Thread: Moving from the Dish to the Clinical Practice

  1. #1

    Moving from the Dish to the Clinical Practice

    J Alzheimers Dis. 2016 Jul 2;53(3):1209-30.

    Moving from the Dish to the Clinical Practice: A Decade of Lessons and Perspectives from the Pre-Clinical and Clinical Stem Cell Studies for Alzheimer's Disease.

    Salem H1,2, Rocha NP1, Colpo GD1, Teixeira AL1.
    Author information

    Abstract
    To date, there is no definitive treatment for Alzheimer's disease (AD). The realm of stem cells is very promising in regenerative medicine, particularly neurodegenerative disorders. Various types of stem cells have been used in multiple trials on AD models, trying to find an innovative management of this disease. In this systematic review, we trace the published preclinical and clinical data throughout the last decade, to show how much knowledge we gained so far in this field and the future perspectives of stem cells in AD treatment.
    KEYWORDS:
    Alzheimer?s disease; clinical trails; neurodegenerative diseases; preclinical trials; stem cells

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27392861
    “As the cast of villains in SCI is vast and collaborative, so too must be the chorus of hero's that rise to meet them” Ramer et al 2005

  2. #2
    Senior Member Vintage's Avatar
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    This looks like a good article, but I'm not able to read the rest of it because it isn't free, (sad face)
    Female, T9 incomplete

  3. #3
    Senior Member Vintage's Avatar
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    After spending an afternoon futilely trying to find a free "back door" into the "Stem Cell Studies for Alzheimer's" article, I gave up and just started reading random Alzheimer's articles. And since I'm now hungry, this one was too good to pass up. In fact, a friend in Rhode Island shipped me some maple syrup that he brought back from a trip 'up north'. I'd like to think that my maple syrup has brain benefits, because it tastes really good.

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montre...tudy-1.3493014

    "Maple syrup isn't only delicious, it could also be good for the brain. Research in Canada and the United States say that botanical compounds found in maple syrup show promise in protecting brain cells against the kind of damage found in Alzheimer's disease.
    "One of the theories of Alzheimer's disease is there are proteins [beta amyloid and tau peptide, in neurons] which clump up and cause harm to the brain,"said University of Toronto professor Donald Weaver. "So we found that a particular extract from maple syrup prevented this clumping." At the current stage of research, tests have only been conducted in a test tube. Determining whether the compounds have the same impact on the brain when they are ingested will be the next step.
    Weaver added that he "would not recommend chugging maple syrup just yet." Researchers only know that it contains interesting botanicals."
    Female, T9 incomplete

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