Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: The Potential of Curcumin in Treatment of Spinal Cord Injury

  1. #1

    The Potential of Curcumin in Treatment of Spinal Cord Injury

    Not sure if this has been posted previously:
    http://www.hindawi.com/journals/nri/2016/9468193/

  2. #2
    Senior Member tarheelandy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Athens, Ga
    Posts
    544
    Blog Entries
    2
    interesting article

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by tarheelandy View Post
    interesting article
    Yes indeed....when I was in rehab in Chicago my Indian boyfriend often made me chicken curry which might have turmeric, I think, and I've always loved brown spicy mustard that has turmeric. I love adding the spice to hummus or other dishes like polenta. I'll see if I can find curcumin supplements though.....Jan

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by FellowHawkeye View Post
    Yes indeed....when I was in rehab in Chicago my Indian boyfriend often made me chicken curry which might have turmeric, I think, and I've always loved brown spicy mustard that has turmeric. I love adding the spice to hummus or other dishes like polenta. I'll see if I can find curcumin supplements though.....Jan

    There are some some high quality turmeric supplements to choose from. However, if I remember correctly it is one that can increase risk for kidney/bladder stones. I think it might decrease testosterone too. I'm going off memory.
    please . . .test what you already know; and give us what you have. we may not be dying, but we certainly are not living either

  5. #5
    Please note the article is suggesting that curcumin might be effective in newly-injured (hours to days) SCI, either as a replacement or adjunctive to corticosteroids such as methylprednisolone which are standard of care. The idea here is that the secondary inflammation cascade (which is part of the body's initial injury response -- and quite damaging) could be treated with potent antioxidants/anti-inflammatories. So this scheme is neuro-protective of additional damage, not neuro-restorative of extant damage; folks outside of ICU shouldn't anticipate a benefit to their SCI from curcumin... although they might to their health!

    That said, it's a pretty good idea actually, especially with recent blood brain barrier-penetrating curcumin formulations showing promising efficacy in preclinical Alzheimer's studies. (Human clinical trials are ongoing but none have completed yet.)
    Last edited by Lacrossa; 07-26-2016 at 07:08 PM. Reason: punctuation

  6. #6
    BlackPepper increases the bioavailability of turmeric by over 1000%. It's actually so effective ( clinically proven) that even daily doses as small as a teaspoon can become excessive.

  7. #7
    James, how does one take it with black pepper?

  8. #8
    Sausage gravy on biscuits would be good.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by scimike View Post
    James, how does one take it with black pepper?
    I'm just putting it out there since bioavailability was an issue about taking it Orally. But what was said above is absolutely correctinjuries 24 hours out I'd say long past the pointof potential benefit. But this stuff is apparently great for your health, although with such high bioavailability kidney stones have been a anecdotal Concern for some. anyways to your question A lot of people put it in a paste, and just grind the black pepper into it. I just put a teaspoon in lemon juice, grind a sprinkle of black pepper and just swish it down...acCording to the study the black pepper just has to be in the presence of cumerin to work together


    It is a proven anti-inflammatory, and inflammation is very systemic and the cause for a lot of issues

  10. #10
    [My apologies for the potential double post and clunky notations; I had posted this first a few days ago and it seemed to get caught in the spam filter because of the in-line links.]

    Nowadays most popularly sold curcumin supplements are gel capsules of curcumin mixed with black pepper extract; the most common formulation is called "BioPerine". Black pepper extract contains a chemical called piperine, a CYP3A4 inhibitor (as is curcumin itself, but piperine more so). CYP3A4 is one of the main liver enzymes utilized in drug metabolism, and if blocked, many drugs become much more potent as they remain longer in circulation before being metabolized and deactivated. (Some common food ingredients also inhibit CYP3A4; this is why grapefruit juice has a long "do-not-take-with-these-medications" list.)

    However, bioavailability is only part of the story, and I would direct SCI folks to take a look at Longvida over BioPerine formulations. "Longvida" is the retail brand of a UCLA research project to make curcumin not just more bioavailable, but also more blood-brain barrier penetrating -- and hence active in the brain and spinal cord. The Alzheimer's clinical trials in progress are utilizing Longvida (here's a rundown from UCLA Neurology).

    As to potential health benefits for SCI individuals, there is limited evidence of elevated inflammation and reduced antioxidant concentration persisting in the spinal cord at chronic time points after SCI. Daily oral dosing of potent anti-inflammatories like curcumin hypothetically could affect that, but the actual efficacy or health implications of doing so in SCI are unknown. (This question is being studied with Vit.E in a pilot trial at McMaster University in Canada.)
    Last edited by Lacrossa; 07-30-2016 at 10:03 PM.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-21-2010, 07:47 PM
  2. Replies: 10
    Last Post: 12-19-2009, 02:29 PM
  3. A new potential target in spinal cord injury
    By paolocipolla in forum Cure
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-26-2009, 05:58 PM
  4. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-14-2003, 04:21 PM
  5. Replies: 7
    Last Post: 08-24-2001, 07:28 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •