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Thread: Health implications of SCI in old age

  1. #11
    While I agree with most of the above, aging with a disability is something that we continue to learn about. One reason for this is simple - people are generally living longer and that goes to the SCI community as well. All of the issues cited above are real. That being said, I would work on a plan for trying to stave off the potential complications of a SCI and aging. You need to be real about it - keeping in mind that there are days you may not be as compliant as others. Try baby steps in setting the plan in motion. Maybe once her parents see that you are doing everything you can to prevent problems, they may begin to turn around.

    Also keep in mind that for many parents, "no one" will ever be good enough. I imagine, that in your culture that may be even stronger.

    If you two love each other and want to make this work, then make a plan to win over her parents. Take it one step at a time - maybe invite them out to dinner so they can see the two of you in action. Don't expect miracles - it will take time, if it does work.

    Good luck.

    ckf

  2. #12
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    This thread is both insightful and a bit ominous for a new SCI like me. I'll tell the OP that the adage that love conquers all is true. That said, I'm curious if someone here in Care Cure has compiled a list of recommendations for staving off the most common and disabling problems of living with an SCI.

    For example I see many have reverted back to slideboards. I read this at a time when I'm trying to learn how to STOP using slideboards! I'm trying to get to the point where I can hop in and out of my chair but now it seems this might be misguided? Also, the concerns over ISC worry me as well.

  3. #13
    Faji_tama, you can piece together all the possible harmful things that can happen to people with SCIs, as JamesMcM has a tendency to do, and paint a bleak picture of the future. But the reality is that that picture does not represent any given SCI?s future. There are genetic, environmental and other factors that come into play throughout our life trajectory. For instance, I can say with confidence that love and marriage have contributed substantially to my longevity and quality of life. I have known and worked with over a thousand SCIs during my lifetime, and know that stories similar to mine are not a rarity. I have two C-5 friends whose injuries date back to the early 1960s who have fared as well as I both career and marriage wise. Others have fared poorly. The fact is that none of us come into life with a warranty.
    You have a good many sci years under your belt. How well you have fared up to this point is the best predictor of how you will fare from here forward. I reached my functional peak when I was in my forties. I would likely be in better shape if I had paced myself better. Life is a marathon, not a sprint. Read the shoulders manual linked at the bottom of my post. One other observation I made was that the further up the career ladder you go, the easier work life gets from the standpoint of physical demands. When perks start piling up like a car and driver available for use, aides standing by, first class travel, etc. work life is easy.

    How do your family and your girl friend?s father look at your situation? My family and my father-in-law were very supportive. My FIL only wanted his daughter to be happy. In sum, losing a mother-in-law was not that bad. I wish you the best.
    You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
    http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

    See my personal webpage @
    http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by lynnifer View Post
    I limit my transfers (still have to transfer to a bath lift, toilet and in/out of bed). I went back to a transfer board to save my shoulders about five or six years ago - I think that really helped. If I strain or hurt something - I treat it right away either through a chiropractor or OTC pain meds, therabands and ice/heat. I very rarely hurt myself though because of the precautions I have taken. I have a new bed and went to a board to get in only ... my new bed's a bit high with a memory gel or foam on top with an air mattress overlay ... just asking for an accident to transfer to that so a board is safer.
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    That being said, I would work on a plan for trying to stave off the potential complications of a SCI and aging. You need to be real about it - keeping in mind that there are days you may not be as compliant as others. Try baby steps in setting the plan in motion. Maybe once her parents see that you are doing everything you can to prevent problems, they may begin to turn around.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mize View Post
    That said, I'm curious if someone here in Care Cure has compiled a list of recommendations for staving off the most common and disabling problems of living with an SCI.

    For example I see many have reverted back to slideboards. I read this at a time when I'm trying to learn how to STOP using slideboards! I'm trying to get to the point where I can hop in and out of my chair but now it seems this might be misguided? Also, the concerns over ISC worry me as well.
    I would like to echo the sentiments of Mize here, and would also love to see a list of recommendations for best practices and things we can do to (reasonably) prevent a degraded quality of life later down the road. I'd heard the shoulder thing before, and never paid it much attention, but like Mize noticed, it sounds like many folks have switched BACK to slideboards later on, which is something I haven't used in a good 20-some years. The shoulders guide in SCIfor55yrs's signature was super informative, and I'd love to see more resources on this and other matters: i.e. should I switch back to slideboards?, should I try to reduce the number of times I self-cath in favor of manually voiding, even if it might not be as complete?, etc etc.

    The whole increase risk of bladder cancer due to catheterizing is news to me, and like Mize, rather concerning. From the Googling and reading I did yesterday around the topic, it sounds like that type of cancer (bladder and urinary tract) are pretty rare to begin with, so even with an increased risk for SCI folks, the risk is still low compared to other forms. There seemed to be a bit of disagreement over the actual numbers/percentages of likelihood, however. Knowing that it's a risk though, I'm curious what steps can be taken to reduce it even more: what if, say, I went from my current 5x a day ISC down to 3x, and manually voided the other two times? (and so on)

    Quote Originally Posted by lynnifer View Post
    Wanted to add .. the longer you're in a chair, the greater your chances of a pressure sore. That can sideline a person for a long time. Just another thing to consider.
    Longer as in the amount of time you've spent in the chair in a given day, or longer in the sense of over the course of your life? Pressure sores were definitely an issue for me when I was younger, but ever since I switched to a Roho cushion, things have been dandy. But, are you saying that as I age, it could become an issue again?

    Quote Originally Posted by triumph View Post
    When I went through a bout of pneumonia and was hospitalized for 5 months, hubby was there every single day to visit and care for me, often instructing staff of my needs and advocating for me. We really try to work together.
    I only recently heard about our susceptibility for pneumonia too! My PCP actually brought it up a few visits back and suggested I get vaccinated every so often to prevent against the preventable strains. Thoughts on this?

    Quote Originally Posted by triumph View Post
    Wondering if you have had a heart to heart talk with them about your feelings toward their daughter, taking things a little step at a time, then getting them to express their concerns.
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    Take it one step at a time - maybe invite them out to dinner so they can see the two of you in action. Don't expect miracles - it will take time, if it does work.
    Quote Originally Posted by SCIfor55yrs. View Post
    How do your family and your girl friend?s father look at your situation? My family and my father-in-law were very supportive. My FIL only wanted his daughter to be happy. In sum, losing a mother-in-law was not that bad. I wish you the best.
    Her mother is the only one that's aware of the situation right now, as both her and her mother know (supposedly) that her father would be even less tolerant than her mother. And, with that, her mother has recently mentioned that the two of them would have zero tolerance for the situation, which my girlfriend took to mean that not only would they not acknowledge the relationship or permit me to marry her (if it got to that point), but that they would refuse to ever meet me either, which certainly makes the attempts to win them over a tad difficult. Though as SCI-Nurse suggests, baby steps, and only time will tell.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by faji_tama View Post
    Not at all, and I certainly appreciate the outlook, even if it wasn't really what I wanted to hear. I knew that we SCI folks had a few more things to worry about than others, but the gravity of the matter as indicated by your posts was far heavier than I had expected. And not to suggest that you're being an alarmist or fearmonger, but I would definitely like to hear a bit more from other folks on here about this matter (particularly ones like SCIfor55yrs and darkeyed_daisy who've been dealing with SCI for decades now) about how their condition and situation has changed over the years. I'm 27 years into my paraplegia, so if these are matters that I should be concerned about (in that I can actually do something about them), I'd certainly like to know!



    This story brought a smile to my face, but also a twinge of sadness at how things with the MIL turned out. With the both of us coming from very Asian households and backgrounds, family (and therefore, family approval) is a big deal, and the thought of her mom pushing back against this because of how my health my degrade, my girlfriend pushing back and fighting for us regardless, then only to be unhappy in the end because things turned out exactly as her mother predicted... that's a hard thought to swallow.



    I suspect that those were mostly rhetorical questions, but I'll tangentially address them nonetheless: as my girlfriend said to me on the phone last night, the ironic thing is that, if it weren't for the disability, I'd be the type of guy her mom would immediately encourage her to marry. So, really, it's just the wheelchair, and the future that it could potentially entail. And while I'd like to write it off as ignorance and assumptions, her mother used to be a physical therapist, so, on top of any existing prejudices from being a mother and being Asian (disabilities aren't looked upon too highly in Chinese culture), there are the very real concerns she has as someone who has worked with people in our situation. Ignorance is a little easier to argue against, knowledge and personal experience though...



    As someone who definitely failed to do this when I was much younger and unaware of the long term consequences of not doing certain things, I'd love to hear more about what these little things were that could have helped avoid your current circumstances!

    Honestly , it sounds awful I know becausemanual chair offers a lot more versatility and freedom, but I have heard a lot of people even paraplegics wish they just put aside their pride and used an electric chair when appropriate, just to save their shoulders, maybe even use a transfer board!

    The increased likelihood of bladder cancer, which is A scary reality not much can be done about that because catheters are almost always necessary, you could get a urostomy. But with anything adequate nutrition, antioxidants help fight free radicals, As well as inflammation which will help the joints, minerals help keep the bones as healthy as possible an investment in a vibration plate may be a way to help reverse osteoporosis if you start early enough and can commit to half an hour every day, you may need to try biphosphonate's with it.

    The thing that I find so troubling about SCI is poor health is not a result of bad choices,The injury just does it on its own and it has a snowball effect it catches up with you even if you make the best choices I've seen that in four years I don't want to imagine what ill be like in 30. But it seems painfully obvious.
    Able-bodied people who end up with osteoporosis, are often lazy and/ or make poor health choices. at any age it can be reversed with weighted exercise and adequate nutrition and eliminating the stress response in the body, this is not so with SCI. The likelihood of cancer can be very much decreased by exercising daily ( not something easily done for SCIas overuse of the shoulders become a serious problem ), nutrition, educating yourself on what to eat. With the spinal cord injury you really can't afford to just eat whatever you want, and drink all your water intake is very important, and your calcium intake is very important I would've buys all of us to get abundant antioxidant as fact is I think we are more prone to cancer in general. Bodies are in a constant state of stress because of the damaged central nervous system, nerve pain and spasms are just an example of a response of that, we can use system, the body completely realtors, there's no questioning there are cellular repercussions. What I'm getting at is nutrition is absolutely vital, we do not have the luxury to fool around with junk food. Be smart.
    Last edited by JamesMcM; 04-27-2016 at 08:17 PM.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Mize View Post
    This thread is both insightful and a bit ominous for a new SCI like me. I'll tell the OP that the adage that love conquers all is true. That said, I'm curious if someone here in Care Cure has compiled a list of recommendations for staving off the most common and disabling problems of living with an SCI.
    Eat healthy - this is a convoluted area without great expert agreement but at the least: control the calories, eat plenty of vegetables and some fruit, eat more protein than the USDA recommends (say 100g per day), drink mostly water
    Reduce stress - a good woman is ideal here (EDIT - really for this whole list, in fact)
    Exercise some (al)most every day - include strength as well as cardio type workouts
    Get vaccinated and screened as recommended
    Pay close attention to your skin and bladder management
    Use assistive devices whenever they improve quality of life - power chairs and sliding boards aren't for the 'weak'
    Manage alcohol and drug use appropriately
    Get enough sleep - 7 or 8 hours per night for most of us
    Keep your mind active - reading, puzzles, hobbies
    Do something with your time that interests and fulfills you
    Avoid asshats and nimrods
    Foster supportive friends and family

  7. #17
    [QUOTE=faji_tama;1798089]I would like to echo the sentiments of Mize here, and would also love to see a list of recommendations for best practices and things we can do to (reasonably) prevent a degraded quality of life later down the road. I'd heard the shoulder thing before, and never paid it much attention, but like Mize noticed, it sounds like many folks have switched BACK to slideboards later on, which is something I haven't used in a good 20-some years. The shoulders guide in SCIfor55yrs's signature was super informative, and I'd love to see more resources on this and other matters: i.e. should I switch back to slideboards?, should I try to reduce the number of times I self-cath in favor of manually voiding, even if it might not be as complete?, etc etc.

    I did an internet search "living well with spinal cord injury." Actually there is quite a body of literature that is available. The information is not neatly compiled into a one-stop, singular list, but there are some good resources and ideas for living healthy and well with a spinal cord injury.

    Anything you can do to preserve shoulder mobility and health will serve you well as you age. Reducing the number of times you transfer without a slideboard per day may help preserve your shoulders. It couldn't hurt to stay in practice with the slideboard technique.

    The whole increase risk of bladder cancer due to catheterizing is news to me, and like Mize, rather concerning. From the Googling a reading I did yesterday around the topic, it sounds like that type of cancer (bladder and urinary tract) are pretty rare to begin with, so even with an increased risk for SCI folks, the risk is still low compared to other forms. There seemed to be a bit of disagreement over the actual numbers/percentages of likelihood, however. Knowing that it's a risk though, I'm curious what steps can be taken to reduce it even more: what if, say, I went from my current 5x a day ISC down to 3x, and manually voided the other two times? (and so on)

    It is highly unlikely that reducing the number of times you self cath per day will have a impact of any degree on your risk of bladder cancer over your life time. And there are immediate risks associated with "manual voiding" that make that practice unacceptable at spinal cord rehabilitation centers. Supra pubic and indwelling urethral catheters are the bladder management techniques most associated with bladder cancer risk, along with smoking, and frequent and recurring urinary tract infections that increase bladder irritation and inflammation.

    Longer as in the amount of time you've spent in the chair in a given day, or longer in the sense of over the course of your life? Pressure sores were definitely an issue for me when I was younger, but ever since I switched to a Roho cushion, things have been dandy. But, are you saying that as I age, it could become an issue again? I don't think "Lynnifer" was referring to how many hours a day you spend in a chair. She most likely was referring to the number of years of being spinal cord injured and the probability that you will get a pressure sore. Posture and skin changes as we age making us more susceptible to pressure problems.

    I only recently heard about our susceptibility for pneumonia too! My PCP actually brought it up a few visits back and suggested I get vaccinated every so often to prevent against the preventable strains. Thoughts on this?[QUOTE] Here are some guidelines for pneumonia vaccination (Web MD):

    "When Should Adults Get a Pneumococcal Vaccine?

    The pneumococcal vaccine can be given at any time of the year.
    ***The pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23) is recommended for the following adults:

    Adults ages 19 to 64 with certain medical conditions (for example, certain kidney diseases, cigarette smoking, asthma, chronic heart or lung disease, asplenia, and conditions that cause weakening of the immune system) should receive one or two doses of PPSV23 given five years apart.
    ***The pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) is recommended for the following adults:
    Adults ages 19 and older with asplenia, sickle cell disease, cerebrospinal fluid leaks, cochlear implants, or conditions that cause weakening of the immune system.
    It's now recommended that adults ages 65 and older get both vaccines.

    Adults age 65 or older who are need to get both should get the PCV13 vaccine first, followed by PPSV23 6 to 12 months later. If an adult was already vaccinated with PPSV23, he or she should receive the PCV13 vaccine a year or more later."

    I'm sure physicians can make a case to insurance companies and Medicare to administer these vaccinations to someone with a spinal cord injury, especially in higher injuries where there can be serious respiratory complications.


    All the best,
    GJ
    Last edited by gjnl; 04-27-2016 at 05:15 PM.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by SCIfor55yrs. View Post
    Faji_tama, you can piece together all the possible harmful things that can happen to people with SCIs, as JamesMcM has a tendency to do, and paint a bleak picture of the future. But the reality is that that picture does not represent any given SCI?s future. There are genetic, environmental and other factors that come into play throughout our life trajectory. For instance, I can say with confidence that love and marriage have contributed substantially to my longevity and quality of life. I have known and worked with over a thousand SCIs during my lifetime, and know that stories similar to mine are not a rarity. I have two C-5 friends whose injuries date back to the early 1960s who have fared as well as I both career and marriage wise. Others have fared poorly. The fact is that none of us come into life with a warranty.
    You have a good many sci years under your belt. How well you have fared up to this point is the best predictor of how you will fare from here forward. I reached my functional peak when I was in my forties. I would likely be in better shape if I had paced myself better. Life is a marathon, not a sprint. Read the shoulders manual linked at the bottom of my post. One other observation I made was that the further up the career ladder you go, the easier work life gets from the standpoint of physical demands. When perks start piling up like a car and driver available for use, aides standing by, first class travel, etc. work life is easy.

    How do your family and your girl friend?s father look at your situation? My family and my father-in-law were very supportive. My FIL only wanted his daughter to be happy. In sum, losing a mother-in-law was not that bad. I wish you the best.
    No the reality is not, I'm not just painting a bleak picture I'm explaining the other side that you're trying to pretend it isn't real,as it's not pleasant. I got a 95-year-old great-grandmother who is probably in better shape than you, in certain ways she's better shape than me, our skin is probably as fragile same as our bones, she goes to the bathroom herself no suppositories are catheters needed, she doesn't have chronic infections or a neurogenic bladder! fact is there will be no SCIs in that good of shape at her age. She got there but never drinking, watching her water, eating properly her body isn't riddled with disease and damage,and most importantly she walks on a daily basis keeps your body moving as much as possible which is extremely important in the elderly! Did she get lucky, sorta she's got a few friends she grew up with, but let's not forget that she grew up in a time where lead poisoning was abundant, they were exposed to much worse carcinogenic's that we are today. You speak as if because you know of 10 peoplethat are relatively healthy after a long run with SCI that that makes it fact, small numbers. The actual statisticsbased on large numbers healthcare checks are there and just like SCI-nurse and myself said The full implications of ageing with spinal cord injury is not not yet determined; it probably never will be; there's too many factors as I explained in my last post, there's no conclusive evidence on long-term implications of dysreflexia for god sake's one simple aspect of SCI! Here's a fact the average 60-year-old will not have osteoporosis, muscle atrophy, incontinence, reliance on catheters, serious joint damage, contractors, past history of bone fractures, damage to the central nervous system, autonomic dysreflexia, blood pressure issues, weak skin with history of bedsores, minor/mild/severe scoliosis,history of chronic infections etc. etc. An SCI who has been in the wheelchair for 25+ years at the age of 60+ will have all of that! You have all of that unfortunately, I'm 24 4 years post and I have all of that,there are very few minor very low SCIs that are blessed with a very flaccid bladder among other things that May not be riddled with all that! Your average able-bodied 60-year-old would maybe have two or three of those probably too much lesser degree, in all likelihood the average person does not have any of those conditions I have a huge family, a majority are 60+ and my one uncle had knee surgery that's it other than that they all still snowmobile in the winter, hunt and farm;I'll point this out there's no none of them make the healthiest choices ever in their life.I have lost two aunts to cancer but that disease he get any of us... it's a simple as this if you were to take 500 people age 60 and up, group 1 250 able-bodied, and group 2 250 spinal cord injuries all being in a chair for longer than 20 years (meaning they aged with the disability) you then take these 500 people do full medical checks, including comparing medical history,New bone density scan's, MRIs of the joints, range of motion test, biopsies, CAT scans, ultrasounds,blood tests, skin examination etc. It's self-explanatory that the results would be staggeringly One sided, they would be completely daunting to new injuries! Both groups would have illnesses, abnormalities etc. but the ratio in Group 2 would be un comparable, not one patient in that group would come out scot-free. A "study" like that would be so useless and pointless because it's self-explanatory. If group 2 only consisted of cervical complete injuries The results would be very dark ill call it. This is why SCI so desperately deserves a treatment, not just for the obvious implications of all the of life, but for the extreme damage to the human body and very serious health implications!

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by JamesMcM View Post
    No the reality is not, I'm not just painting a bleak picture I'm explaining the other side that you're trying to pretend it isn't real,as it's not pleasant. I got a 95-year-old great-grandmother who is probably in better shape than you, in certain ways she's better shape than me, our skin is probably as fragile same as our bones, she goes to the bathroom herself no suppositories are catheters needed, she doesn't have chronic infections or a neurogenic bladder! fact is there will be no SCIs in that good of shape at her age. She got there but never drinking, watching her water, eating properly her body isn't riddled with disease and damage,and most importantly she walks on a daily basis keeps your body moving as much as possible which is extremely important in the elderly! Did she get lucky, sorta she's got a few friends she grew up with, but let's not forget that she grew up in a time where lead poisoning was abundant, they were exposed to much worse carcinogenic's that we are today. You speak as if because you know of 10 peoplethat are relatively healthy after a long run with SCI that that makes it fact, small numbers. The actual statisticsbased on large numbers healthcare checks are there and just like SCI-nurse and myself said The full implications of ageing with spinal cord injury is not not yet determined; it probably never will be; there's too many factors as I explained in my last post, there's no conclusive evidence on long-term implications of dysreflexia for god sake's one simple aspect of SCI! Here's a fact the average 60-year-old will not have osteoporosis, muscle atrophy, incontinence, reliance on catheters, serious joint damage, contractors, past history of bone fractures, damage to the central nervous system, autonomic dysreflexia, blood pressure issues, weak skin with history of bedsores, minor/mild/severe scoliosis,history of chronic infections etc. etc. An SCI who has been in the wheelchair for 25+ years at the age of 60+ will have all of that! You have all of that unfortunately, I'm 24 4 years post and I have all of that,there are very few minor very low SCIs that are blessed with a very flaccid bladder among other things that May not be riddled with all that! Your average able-bodied 60-year-old would maybe have two or three of those probably too much lesser degree, in all likelihood the average person does not have any of those conditions I have a huge family, a majority are 60+ and my one uncle had knee surgery that's it other than that they all still snowmobile in the winter, hunt and farm;I'll point this out there's no none of them make the healthiest choices ever in their life.I have lost two aunts to cancer but that disease he get any of us... it's a simple as this if you were to take 500 people age 60 and up, group 1 250 able-bodied, and group 2 250 spinal cord injuries all being in a chair for longer than 20 years (meaning they aged with the disability) you then take these 500 people do full medical checks, including comparing medical history,New bone density scan's, MRIs of the joints, range of motion test, biopsies, CAT scans, ultrasounds,blood tests, skin examination etc. It's self-explanatory that the results would be staggeringly One sided, they would be completely daunting to new injuries! Both groups would have illnesses, abnormalities etc. but the ratio in Group 2 would be un comparable, not one patient in that group would come out scot-free. A "study" like that would be so useless and pointless because it's self-explanatory. If group 2 only consisted of cervical complete injuries The results would be very dark ill call it. This is why SCI so desperately deserves a treatment, not just for the obvious implications of all the of life, but for the extreme damage to the human body and very serious health implications!
    Without question, "SCI deserves a treatment." There are any number of studies and projects in the works to that end today, and many more in the future before we see "a treatment" (probably more like quite a few treatments given the diversity of the injury). Knowing the risks that we face with a spinal cord injury is important and imperative to living with a spinal cord injury. That said, we can't spend what life time we have dwelling and perseverating on these risks. We've got to take the risks into consideration as we live our lives and try to make the right choices to live as well as we can. As with everything in living a life, the key is weighing the risks/rewards in a balance. That is good advise for any one, no matter if they are aging with or without a spinal cord injury.

    All the best,
    GJ

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by gjnl View Post
    Without question, "SCI deserves a treatment." There are any number of studies and projects in the works to that end today, and many more in the future before we see "a treatment" (probably more like quite a few treatments given the diversity of the injury). Knowing the risks that we face with a spinal cord injury is important and imperative to living with a spinal cord injury. That said, we can't spend what life time we have dwelling and perseverating on these risks. We've got to take the risks into consideration as we live our lives and try to make the right choices to live as well as we can. As with everything in living a life, the key is weighing the risks/rewards in a balance. That is good advise for any one, no matter if they are aging with or without a spinal cord injury.

    All the best,
    GJ
    Agreed, but what is troubling is the ways we are given to manage those "risks" that are caused by the injuryoften just opened the door to more damage long term, such as catheters, biphosphonate's the list goes on Youth is no shield either, and ageing greatly exasperates this.

    I agree mostly, but I'm going to fixate on them as with my injury ( high complete cervical) that's the only way I can actually somewhat prevent them, it's a full time job.would I recommend that for everyone; no, would I recommend that for anyone trying to have substantial recoveryin the future; yes as you'll need a body to recover.

    However pretending that ageing has the same implications with or without SCI, is straight up stupidity!!you have to be one hell of delusional to actually believe that I'm sorry but that is fing true. That's not healthy, you need to be very aware of the reality of the situation to manage it!

    One thing that troubles me is if regular catheterization does increase the likelihood of bladder cancer,because of frequent irritation, inflammation etc. we pretty much are more susceptible to cancer in general,again nothing is proven, as it's too soon ( although not ejaculating may increase risk of prostate cancer, prostate cancer being one of the most common). But our body is in a constant state of shock, fight or flight even when we are calm cortisol is more than likely riddled through our body from nerve pain, spasm's, just inescapable unrepairable damage to the central nervous system in general . The stress hormone has been hypothesized to cause numerous problems in the body, susceptibility to cancer being one of them. When we hear eat healthy, I don't think enough emphasis is given you have to Really eat healthy with SCI,Poor health choices with food actually cause cortisol release wheats, sugars etc. our bodies can't process it well! after SCI our digestion is affected, so it's safe to assume we process things even worse. Also Inflammation is much more common in our body, from the injury, frequent infections, bacterial colonization, joint damage,foreign objects etc. and we'r obviously much more susceptible to it. We also have to be very wary of autonomic dysreflexia there's no telling the full damage it can have on the body and the brain! Frankly I believe that there is cellular implications after a severe paralyzing injury, everything alters The entire body is affected how would it not be. There's just no literature out there, and there's too many possible threatening implications that we're only barely starting to realize! let's not forget SCI's haven't been surviving that long, not even a century yet and life expectancy has always been lower, just from simple observation. The obvious things like osteoporosis, bladder pressure etc. there are no truly safe ways to manage them, it's scary. Be rigorous, be religiouswith your diet, ( personal nutrition deserves your time to be researched) that's our best bet and hope luck is on your side... I don't care what anyone says it's important to know The full implications of the injury especially with aging, and to study this stuff, while more is being discovered.
    Last edited by JamesMcM; 04-27-2016 at 09:02 PM.

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