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Thread: Health implications of SCI in old age

  1. #21
    The woman's parents sound rather narrow minded in my opinion. I would just ignore them and hopefully the woman will too if she really loves you. Eventually they will probably come around. Anybody can have health issues, I think a lot of it is genetic in nature such increased risk of Cancer and that sort of thing. I know a lot of Para's and Quads who are healthy in their 50's and 60's and even older. Just go about your life and live it the best you can and don't worry about things, life is too short to worry.
    "Life is about how you
    respond to not only the
    challenges you're dealt but
    the challenges you seek...If
    you have no goals, no
    mountains to climb, your
    soul dies".~Liz Fordred

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Curt Leatherbee View Post
    The woman's parents sound rather narrow minded in my opinion. I would just ignore them and hopefully the woman will too if she really loves you. Eventually they will probably come around. Anybody can have health issues, I think a lot of it is genetic in nature such increased risk of Cancer and that sort of thing. I know a lot of Para's and Quads who are healthy in their 50's and 60's and even older. Just go about your life and live it the best you can and don't worry about things, life is too short to worry.
    The whole genetic disposition is controversial at best! My aunt just died of an extreme case of leukemia, we don't even have any indication of either side of her family having any cancer actually ( One case of lung cancer I believe, smoker). And her daughter was just diagnosed with MS, again no known member of either side of her family having it! Her brother and father are Whistlin Dixie's, her great-grandmother almost 100 years old living on her own, you know. My grandpa lays in bed constantly, and eats the greasiest food you can imagine lots of meat no greens and drinks like a fish no cancer but plenty of kidney stone's, I'm not more likely to get kidney stones as none of his children; one being my mother have had any, nor have I it's just an overlapping of bad habits and poor choices! And in rare cases bad situations hazardous workplace, exposure,sudden disability etc.

  3. #23
    Senior Member lynnifer's Avatar
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    In any case, the first 15yrs were gravy. The next ten were me working and school etc so I was very busy.

    I started to notice bladder issues at 25yrs in.

    Bowel care will change for sure. I attended a seminar on aging at a rehab centre years ago and it was mentioned that things you use today will lose their effectiveness in the future.

    Life is about risks. If she's willing to risk with you, go for it!
    Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

    T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

  4. #24
    Faji_tama, it seems like the crux of your problem is the cultural divide. If you could prove that you are the healthiest SCI in the world your GF's parents would still disapprove of your relationship. In their eyes you are flawed. You can try to try to slowly move closer to them but I have doubts about that happening. I would bet that there will be increasing pressure on your GF to seek a a non-disabled marriage partner. You may be in the predicament of having to chose between pursuing the relationship and becoming estranged from the family, or terminating your relationship with your GF and moving on with your life with the hope of finding a new love.
    Last edited by SCIfor55+yrs.; 04-28-2016 at 12:43 PM.
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  5. #25
    I think that SCIfor55years is probably right. Although the discussion here was eye opening for many, I think that many who stated you need to know the risks, deal with them the best you can and live your life, is probably the best advice. Unfortunately, there are many disease processes that we can not control. Yes, SCI may exacerbate them, but health care providers are trying to come up with ways to either treat or prevent them. Unfortunately, there is only so much time in the day and all of this takes time.
    Good luck in whatever your decision is. No one but the two of you can figure out what is right for you. Let us know what happens!

    ckf

  6. #26
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    Thanks again for all the feedback, advice, and opinions everyone! I have no idea how things will turn out with the girlfriend, but I'll give it a try and see how things go. At the very least, it got me looking into and aware of these issues that us SCI folk face, so I can at least start doing what I can to mitigate the risks! (Better 27 years late than never and too late, right?)

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