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Thread: The Best Men

  1. #1

    The Best Men

    Great movie about the start of wheelchair sports in England during WWII. If you are paralyzed, you need to watch this. The Stoke-Mandeville Games were the very beginning of wheelchair sports. The German physiatrist treating British veterans reminded me of Dr Heiner Sells at IRM during my rehab in 1970.

    I started wheelchair sports in 1971 playing wheelchair basketball in Queens, NY for the Bulova Watchmakers, our coach Ben Lipton. My friend, double above knee amputee Fred Francis got me involved. He was a great natural athlete and drove a big Ford station wagon. He would enter from the rear window, toss his body into the rear of the wagon then pull his 55 lb E&J wheelchair into the rear. He would vault above the middle seats into the driver seat. Later, my wife and I played for the Laurinburg Knights of St Andrews College in Laurinberg, NC. After relocating to Mi we played for the Flint Flyers. We then started wheelchair road racing in 1983 and continued to 1995.When we stopped competing in race chairs We continued for a decade recreationally with handcycles. In our 70's now we are thankful we have a powerful history of physical activity.

    Although we are all gimps in truth we are Olympic class athletes as we function so far above our limitations.
    Last edited by ancientgimp; 03-26-2016 at 08:27 AM.

  2. #2
    We still remember fondly one Fall getting ready for the Free Press Marathon doing a 20 mile training run at Indian Springs Metropark. The trail was heavy with fallen leaves which crackled as we rolled. I was way faster than my wife but she was able to use the advantage of drafting behind me all 20 miles and days later posted her best marathon time.

    Now we use every piece of adaptive equipment we can find. I'm a para, my wife a post polio semi quad, both in our 70's. This movie reminds us that we are all champions in that we (whether power chair users or super gimps) have recognized our severe limitations then gone on to live good lives.

  3. #3
    The title is The Best of Men,

    It is in my Netflix Queue:

    All the best,
    GJ
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  4. #4
    Senior Member ChesBay's Avatar
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    Have it in Amazon Prime rental $3.99 HD.
    Sounds good, looking forward to it.

    eta: on, "Netflix Streaming" will watch over the weekend.
    Last edited by ChesBay; 03-26-2016 at 01:04 AM.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by ancientgimp View Post
    Great movie about the start of wheelchair sports in England during WWII. If you are paralyzed, you need to watch this. The Stoke-Mandeville Games were the very beginning of wheelchair sports. The German physiatrist treating British veterans reminded me of Dr Heiner Sells at IRM during my rehab in 1070.
    1070?? You are a geezer!! (I am sure you mean 1970!!!!)

    Sir Ludwig Guttmann did so much more than be the founder of wheelchair sports. He is considered the father of SCI medicine. He was a neurologist and neurosurgeon (not a physiatrist). A Jewish German refugee who escaped Germany in 1939 and went to England, he started the first SCI rehabilitation center in 1943. The movie is really more about this than about his founding of the Stoke-Mandeville Games (which eventually became the Paralympics). He also wrote the first scholarly paper on AD, invented intermittent catheterization, and was one of the first health care professionals to consider SCI something more than "a condition not to be treated". He practiced through the 1970s, so there are still physicians who trained with Dr. Gutmann, practicing today.

    http://paralympics.org.uk/games/ludwig-guttmann

    http://www.poppaguttmanncelebration.org/poppa2.php

    Heiner Sell, MD (not Sells) was a founding member of ASIA, also born in Germany, who died tragically young from cancer. He trained under Howard Rusk, MD, who is also considered one of the founders of the field of SCI medicine.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3743966/

    (KLD)

  6. #6
    Sorry for posting while drinking beer and watching NCAA. Dr Sell was a wonderful person, he was quite young and very athletic. I tried to talk him out of risky skiing warning him he would wind up like us (his patients).His early death from cancer was a tragedy.

    The movie was excellent, apparently sci vets were kept in a back ward, were over medicated and covered with bedsores. Dr Guttman offered a whole new approach to spinal cord rehab. One flaw I found was the absence of quads on the ward

  7. #7
    There were virtually no quad survivors of SCI in WWII, with a few exceptions, primarily because they did not know about how to prevent pneumonia and respiratory failure during the acute phase. An example is Gen. George Patton, who sustained a C6 injury in 1945 in a car accident, and died 10 days later from pneumonia, in spite of of course having access to the "best care" available. Even someone with a fairly incomplete tetraplegia was very lucky to live (think Bob Dole), who lost 50% of his body weight, spent 20 months in an acute care hospital in Europe, and nearly died several times during that hospitalization.

    (KLD)

  8. #8
    Thanks for the excellent info sci-nurse. Now that I have returned to sobriety I have edited my last night post. I'm still a geezer.

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