Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 32

Thread: Keith Smith . "We are going to walk again! "

  1. #1

    Keith Smith . "We are going to walk again! "

    I'm Keith. I am 30 years old. I broke my neck when I was 23 in 2009. I was in a motorcycle accident. Please watch my five YouTube story below...I will begin a blog on YouTube in a few days. Please subscribe! Please ask any questions you may have. Let my experience help you ask away!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bQFkV-nNyeM

  2. #2
    Keith, I watched your video. It's good to have hope but when we were babies we had to crawl before we walked. You have good arm movement and strength, get rid of that power chair and push a manual until you can walk. Best of luck to you!
    From the time you were born till you ride in a hearse, there is nothing so bad that it couldn't be worse!

    All fringe benifits must be authorized by Helen Waite, if you want your SCI fixed go to Helen Waite!

    Why be politically correct when you can be right!

  3. #3
    I have a manual chair. I agree with you 100%! Just trying to figure out the logistics of it. Thanks, Oldtimer.

  4. #4
    Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Near Detroit MI
    Posts
    15
    I really dislike the notion that unless the person with the SCI is always, constantly working towards getting out of that chair, they've somehow "given up" on life. Im definitely not saying that the OP is such a case, the thread title is what reminded me of this notion (which is surprisingly commonplace, even among the SCI community itself.) Its the underlying implication that life using a chair is not worth living, or not as valuable as an able-bodied life.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by A trophy guy View Post
    I really dislike the notion that unless the person with the SCI is always, constantly working towards getting out of that chair, they've somehow "given up" on life. Im definitely not saying that the OP is such a case, the thread title is what reminded me of this notion (which is surprisingly commonplace, even among the SCI community itself.) Its the underlying implication that life using a chair is not worth living, or not as valuable as an able-bodied life.
    Totally agree. Just a general observation and in no way meant to diss the original poster but I do find the attitude of both ABs and some people w/ SCI that our lives should be devoted to walking again. SCI is an injury, not a disease, an ingury which is beyond the body's ability to fix. If I had my eyes gouged out no one would be expecting me to devote my life to growing new eyeballs and seeing again yet somehow there is a prevalent belief that if you aren't actively trying to walk again I am "giving up".

    Oh and BTW your avatar is hilarious.

  6. #6
    Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Near Detroit MI
    Posts
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by t8burst View Post
    Totally agree. Just a general observation and in no way meant to diss the original poster but I do find the attitude of both ABs and some people w/ SCI that our lives should be devoted to walking again. SCI is an injury, not a disease, an ingury which is beyond the body's ability to fix. If I had my eyes gouged out no one would be expecting me to devote my life to growing new eyeballs and seeing again yet somehow there is a prevalent belief that if you aren't actively trying to walk again I am "giving up".

    Oh and BTW your avatar is hilarious.
    Well said!

  7. #7
    Senior Member NW-Will's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Vancouver WA USA - - Male T4 ASIA B incomplete
    Posts
    1,796
    Quote Originally Posted by t8burst View Post
    Totally agree. Just a general observation and in no way meant to diss the original poster but I do find the attitude of both ABs and some people w/ SCI that our lives should be devoted to walking again. SCI is an injury, not a disease, an ingury which is beyond the body's ability to fix. If I had my eyes gouged out no one would be expecting me to devote my life to growing new eyeballs and seeing again yet somehow there is a prevalent belief that if you aren't actively trying to walk again I am "giving up".
    Agree.. I just think it takes everyone their own time to reach that point, and to some it what gives them the motivation to keep on going..

  8. #8
    I findit more of "giving in" to the chair. Which in my case has huge implicationsfar more disturbing than simply sitting in a chair, by doing that it means I am giving in to a life of dependency, which means I would not only have to accept,but actually expect to be taken care of the rest of my life! That isn't acceptable in my eye; In fact it turns my stomach. Especially when the limited options available to me do not justify it in anyway; It's completely undignified! In severe cases where you can't even go 24 hours on your own, or far worsecan't even get yourself in and out of bed, handle bathroom stuff etc it's not about me believing it's a lesser life, it's just plain undignified, and so much is now off the Table because of the disability, then how can I justify such atrocity when what I truly enjoy and want to do is no longer there! So you do everything in your power not to necessarily get out of the chair but to be able to live a dignified independent life, on your own terms, with your own abilities most importantly with freedom! And something that often gets forgotten is by all of us trying to get out of the chair as you call it, we slowly make it a possibility that no one else will end up like us, which makes this world just a little bit better; when people don't lose most of their bodily function because of one mistake! Frankly nobody deserves to live like this, everybody deserves a healthy body! That's the only true "fight" after a serious cervical SCI in my eyes!


    Every time I read up on assisted suicide, I constantly see these elderly people and how they say I'm managing my age or my disability pretty good right now, but when I can no longer take care of myself is when I draw the line; most people agree with that. I even see people that are able to recover on here saying they can't stand being taken care of so they do everything they can not to be; unfortunately some people are not lucky enough to have an incomplete injury or a lower onewhere their independence is still achievable. What I find disturbing is peoples conception that oh you bumped your spinal cord bad enough, OK now it's perfectly fine for you to be spoonfed and taking care of constantly, shit your pants that's OK... I couldn't disagree with anything more, I don't think it's acceptable at all! But that's just me, how you feel about your disability is up to you; so that shouldn't matter. just don't try and force your opinion on other people, calling others who don't agree with you cowards or weak to reinforce your own coping mechanisms and to supposedly help someone by living the life that you think is appropriate after something as severe as quadriplegia! We're all individuals, that girl that starved herself to death in a group home to avoid being taken care of, that rugby player the didn't want to be spoonfed they ended their life, one in a truly horrible way there's nothing cowardly about it;there's nothing weak about it!if anything they didnt let a severe disability change them; They stayed true to how they felt, their principles; they saw in dignity and they got away from it The only way they possibly could; facing the greatest unknown, the greatest test we all have to face death and none of us have the faintest idea of what thats like...
    Last edited by JamesMcM; 04-26-2016 at 07:05 PM.

  9. #9
    Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Near Detroit MI
    Posts
    15
    I see you haven't changed one bit. I feel sorry for you James.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by JamesMcM View Post
    I findit more of "giving in" to the chair. Which in my case has huge implicationsfar more disturbing than simply sitting in a chair, by doing that it means I am giving in to a life of dependency, which means I would not only have to accept,but actually expect to be taken care of the rest of my life! That isn't acceptable in my eye; In fact it turns my stomach. Especially when the limited options available to me do not justify it in anyway; It's completely undignified! In severe cases where you can't even go 24 hours on your own, or far worsecan't even get yourself in and out of bed, handle bathroom stuff etc it's not about me believing it's a lesser life, it's just plain undignified, and so much is now off the Table because of the disability, then how can I justify such atrocity when what I truly enjoy and want to do is no longer there! So you do everything in your power not to necessarily get out of the chair but to be able to live a dignified independent life, on your own terms, with your own abilities most importantly with freedom! And something that often gets forgotten is by all of us trying to get out of the chair as you call it, we slowly make it a possibility that no one else will end up like us, which makes this world just a little bit better; when people don't lose most of their bodily function because of one mistake! Frankly nobody deserves to live like this, everybody deserves a healthy body! That's the only true "fight" after a serious cervical SCI in my eyes!


    Every time I read up on assisted suicide, I constantly see these elderly people and how they say I'm managing my age or my disability pretty good right now, but when I can no longer take care of myself is when I draw the line; most people agree with that. I see even people that are able to recover on here saying they can't stand being taken care of so they do everything they can not to be; unfortunately some people are not lucky enough to have an incomplete injury or a lower onewhere their independence is still achievable. What I find disturbing is peoples conception that oh you bumped your spinal cord bad enough, OK now it's perfectly fine for you to be spoonfed and taking care of constantly, shit your pants that's OK... I couldn't disagree with anything more, I don't think it's acceptable at all! But that's just me, how you feel about your disability is up to you; so that shouldn't matter. just don't try and force your opinion on other people, calling others who don't agree with you cowards or weak to reinforce your own coping mechanisms and to supposedly help someone by living the life that you think is appropriate after something as severe as quadriplegia! We're all individuals, that girl that starved herself to death in a group home to avoid being taken care of, that rugby player the didn't want to be spoonfed they ended their life, one in a truly horrible way there's nothing cowardly about it;there's nothing weak about it!if anything they didnt let a severe disability change them; They stayed true to how they felt, their principles; they saw in dignity and they got away from it The only way they possibly could; facing the greatest unknown, the greatest test we all have to face death and none of us have the faintest idea of what thats like...
    Very well said JamesMcM. I really believe SCI should be a human rights issue. We as human beings always should push forward not only the science but the society as well to find a cure for it not only for current SCIs but also for the future ones as the accidents do happen.

Similar Threads

  1. John Smith "moderator-at-large"
    By Wise Young in forum Announcements & Feedback
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 03-08-2005, 06:34 AM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-26-2003, 06:27 AM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-28-2003, 01:39 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •