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Thread: Could Cancer Genes Help Repair Spinal Cord Injuries? - NEWS

  1. #11
    Senior Member lynnifer's Avatar
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    Genetic therapy of any kind - not for me. Won't see this in my lifetime anyway.
    Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

    T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Curt Leatherbee View Post
    The good news "we cured your spinal cord injury" the bad news, "You have 6 months to live, you are dying of Cancer".
    If I was 100% after and had my settlement in hand. I would gladly take that with open arms, no hesitation! A life of dependency, or six months of total freedom and a "dignified" end... Nobody would be touching me until I was long gone. Easy decision wouldn't even have to Think about it...

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    When quoting someone, do so correctly the first time, not the third.
    I guess you do not understand the difference between a quote and a paraphrase.

    What's worse is that you work for Dr.Young (I think), you are the administrator, and yet you have forgotten that Dr. Wise ever said that he saw evidence of long distance spinal cord regeneration in his human trials. It seems like that would be the most important thing to remember.

  4. #14
    Yes, I work for Wise and have heard him discuss this topic dozens of times. He has purposely not used the word regenerate, so you should not say he has.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    Yes, I work for Wise and have heard him discuss this topic dozens of times. He has purposely not used the word regenerate, so you should not say he has.
    "First, we found that evidence of white matter regrowth in 2 of 5 subjects after UCMBC transplants, not just across the gap but apparently long distances both up and down the spinal cord. All ASIA A subjects showed a white matter gap before treatment. None had shown white matter growth across the gap before cell transplantation. The growth does not seem to correspond with motor and sensory scores in the subjects. We believe that this may be because the growing fibers have not yet reached their targets, i.e. have not connected with neurons in the brainstem that would be necessary for sensory improvement or in the lumbosacral spinal cord for voluntary activation of the leg muscles." ~ Dr. Young


    What is the difference in meaning between "regrowth"/ "growing" vs. "regenerating" ?

  6. #16
    Senior Member Moe's Avatar
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    My understanding 'growth' means increase of size, "regeneration" is rebirth/reproducing?

  7. #17
    Exactly

  8. #18
    The point is, Wise has not used the word regenerate and I wanted to clarify that.

  9. #19
    Senior Member Oddity's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nowhere Man View Post
    "First, we found that evidence of white matter regrowth in 2 of 5 subjects after UCMBC transplants, not just across the gap but apparently long distances both up and down the spinal cord. All ASIA A subjects showed a white matter gap before treatment. None had shown white matter growth across the gap before cell transplantation. The growth does not seem to correspond with motor and sensory scores in the subjects. We believe that this may be because the growing fibers have not yet reached their targets, i.e. have not connected with neurons in the brainstem that would be necessary for sensory improvement or in the lumbosacral spinal cord for voluntary activation of the leg muscles." ~ Dr. Young


    What is the difference in meaning between "regrowth"/ "growing" vs. "regenerating" ?
    That is pretty clear. "Regenerate" carries with it an implication of "repair", of "healing", of putting something back into "working" order or into a previously functional state. This is not what the good doctor has claimed. "Regrowth" of the white matter is simply that; the growing of the tissues. The difference is HUGE. This is an important step, to be sure, but the cord has yet to be returned to a functional state worthy of the term "regeneration".

    That's one big difference, IMO.
    "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

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  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Oddity View Post
    That is pretty clear. "Regenerate" carries with it an implication of "repair", of "healing", of putting something back into "working" order or into a previously functional state. This is not what the good doctor has claimed. "Regrowth" of the white matter is simply that; the growing of the tissues. The difference is HUGE. This is an important step, to be sure, but the cord has yet to be returned to a functional state worthy of the term "regeneration".

    That's one big difference, IMO.
    I disagree with your opinion. Most spinal cord papers I read use the term "regenerate" to mean axons are growing from their cut ends, regardless of those axons being "back into a previously functional state". In fact, some have said they got regeneration, but animal's function got worse.
    Last edited by Nowhere Man; 02-26-2016 at 05:01 PM.

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