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Thread: Brain Computer Interface for Quadriplegia and Paraplegia Improvement

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chaz19 View Post
    I agree. Where are the funds for this research coming from? NSF is part of healthcare or....?

    @Grammy I'm still interested know about the funding mechanisms of spinal cord injury researchers receive. At the state level, I've been involved in this process ? but we are still funding basic research. Please enlighten me to how the federal government is disbursing funds and ways we can organize so that we can get an increase like $350 million like ALS.

    When does SCI secondary complications begin to be classified as terminal? Too many of us have been taken early.
    Chaz, how much are you paying Grammy for her research into the topics you want to know about?

  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by nrf View Post
    Chaz, how much are you paying Grammy for her research into the topics you want to know about?
    I do not think you've read all the conversations. If you want to jump to conclusions – you're doing a great job. I asked questions about informative post. If the question cant be answered – that is fine.

    If she can't answer the question - it would be great if someone else did. One point in time there were members who used to read this forum that had connections and information.

    It is very sad. People used to collaborate.

  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by paolocipolla View Post
    Thanks for the clear explanation.
    As I understand the area of neuron replacement has very little research going on and we should push for more research in that area.
    If I remember well not long ago Wise was setting up a conus injury model in rats...
    Neuron replacement does seem to get much less attention than CNS regeneration. I think this is because most people think of LMN damage only applying to people with low thoracic injuries or lower. However, LMN damage effects many people with higher injuries, as I explained above.
    The intriguing thing to me is the LMNs are the same neurons that if injured in the peripheral nervous system, can regenerate on their own...sometimes quite robustly, sometimes barely at all, but they can regenerate. This is why I'm curious to see what neural stem cells or other progenitor cell types might be able to do, because if some cells can differentiate into LMNs, perhaps they could be coaxed out into the periphery to re-innervate muscles with certain growth factors, or, dare I say...electrical stimulation
    BTW I realize I still owe you a more detailed description of my personal research interests on facebook. I haven't forgotten...just been busy.

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by tomsonite View Post
    Neuron replacement does seem to get much less attention than CNS regeneration. I think this is because most people think of LMN damage only applying to people with low thoracic injuries or lower. However, LMN damage effects many people with higher injuries, as I explained above.
    The intriguing thing to me is the LMNs are the same neurons that if injured in the peripheral nervous system, can regenerate on their own...sometimes quite robustly, sometimes barely at all, but they can regenerate. This is why I'm curious to see what neural stem cells or other progenitor cell types might be able to do, because if some cells can differentiate into LMNs, perhaps they could be coaxed out into the periphery to re-innervate muscles with certain growth factors, or, dare I say...electrical stimulation
    BTW I realize I still owe you a more detailed description of my personal research interests on facebook. I haven't forgotten...just been busy.
    You made me smile when you said "dare I say...electrical stimulation "
    BTW I agree that electrical stimulation may help nerve regeneration as there are studies that indicate that, but no significant success yet. So support using some forms of estim in lab studies aiming to get regeneration.
    On the other end one thing that is sure from animal studies published so far is that Epi-Stim alone does not induce any regeneration.
    About the upcoming Epi-Stim trial I am in favor of it so in the end when it will be proven not to bring significant recovery I will tell you "I told you"

    I agree with what you say about studying the second motorneuron and I think (if more researchers work on it) it might even turn out to be easier to fix LMN damage than to get the CNS to regenerate.
    I am T4, so I don't have a personal interest in LMN damage, but I know many paras that have LMN and they need a cure as I do, but first let's get people out of ventilator and give back arm and hand functions to quads.

    Another interesting approach I think is to study the sensory neuron that has one axon that goes in the PNS and one goes in the CNS. If you cut the one that goes in the PNS you get regeneration, while if you cut the axon that goes in the CNS it does not regenerate. Why? It has been shown that there is a different epigenetic response to injury, put the question
    remains open.

    I'll keep an eye on the FB notifications
    In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

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