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Thread: An update article on Darek Fidyka

  1. #11
    no dirty knife wounds allowed

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by niallel View Post
    When you say acute knife wound, do you mean acute as in less than 2 years after injury?
    I think Darek was near 2 years after when he had the surgery.

    What I like about this article/video is that they are telling people what they have done and what has worked. They are doing this without having to be published in the medical press beforehand.

    Do they have something to loose by doing it this way?

    If not I wish everyone would publish their findings in a way we can understand, seeing a bit of progress in the light of day is great and gives me a bit of hope that there will be a fix for us.
    I believe the study was published back a few years ago...

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23561833

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Silvio GS View Post
    Does it only have to be a clean knife cut in order to prove a nerve regeneration? Let's say they try it on a few chronic complete subjects, and then all of them would show improvements, would this not be enough?
    I think a lot of this was covered a couple years ago in this thread.

    http://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/showthr...een-posted-yet

    A clean cut with a knife or razor on a cord is different than making a SCI with an impactor machine that more closely resembles a human SCI. Most SCI is contusion injury so the axons have been stretched, broken and they receded back from the lesion site.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by GRAMMY View Post
    Here's a recent article updating everyone on the progress of Darek Fidyka. He's the gentleman that had the mucosa nose cell surgery with transplanted cells from the brain and a nerve bridge done by the surgeon in Poland. LINK

    " the gentleman that had the mucosa nose cell surgery with transplanted cells from the brain"

    WHAT???

    So did he get the cells from "the mucosa nose" or "from the "brain"?

    Please read the paper before posting misleading informations!
    In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

  5. #15
    An article that appeared in the New Yorker Magazine in January:

    http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/20...dicine-d-t-max

  6. #16
    The reporter did not profess knowing anything about anatomy. The OEC bulbs are at the base of the brain, behind the eyeballs Paolo.

    Here’s what happened in surgery:
    .... In April, 2012, Tabakow, with his medical team, opened up Fidyka’s skull and removed part of his olfactory bulb. The human sense of smell is not very acute, so the olfactory bulb is relatively small—about the size of a sunflower seed. (A goat’s is larger.) Tabakow and his associates next sliced the extracted tissue into two-millimetre sections, isolated the olfactory ensheathing cells, and then gave them almost two weeks to subdivide, in order to have enough cells—half a million—for the operation. Then he opened Fidyka’s spine around the T9 vertebra and made almost a hundred microinjections to situate the cells above and below the wound. He placed more of the cells onto a strip of nerve tissue that he’d extracted from Fidyka’s lower leg and inserted in his spine, in order to help span the gap in his cord. Tabakow closed the incision, and within a few weeks his patient was beginning his real rehabilitation.

    OK. I hope they quickly find a couple of more patients with knife wounds. Maybe they will show some improvement, as Darek has. I predict it will be difficult to prove it was the olfactory cells and not the nerve graft or even the heavy duty PT that did the trick. Certainly one of the major confounding factors in moving this work forward is how the olfactory bulb cells are harvested. Darek consented to have his skull opened to access the bulbs. It's hard to imagine that’s going to be the standard of care. Raisman and Tabakow have been experimenting with cadavers to get at the olfactory bulb by way of an eyebrow incision (also known as
    keyhole supraorbital craniotomy), which is somewhat less gnarly. Future wise, both suggest this treatment can be applied to people with more normal contusion injuries, once they work out a few more details.

    LINK

    Last edited by GRAMMY; 03-07-2016 at 08:14 PM.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by mamadavid View Post
    An article that appeared in the New Yorker Magazine in January:

    http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/20...dicine-d-t-max
    The actual paper it's open acces i.e. it's free.. look for it on pubmed or just google it..
    In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by GRAMMY View Post
    The OEC bulbs are at the base of the brain, behind the eyeballs.

    Here’s what happened in surgery:
    .... In April, 2012, Tabakow, with his medical team, opened up Fidyka’s skull and removed part of his olfactory bulb. The human sense of smell is not very acute, so the olfactory bulb is relatively small—about the size of a sunflower seed. (A goat’s is larger.) Tabakow and his associates next sliced the extracted tissue into two-millimetre sections, isolated the olfactory ensheathing cells, and then gave them almost two weeks to subdivide, in order to have enough cells—half a million—for the operation. Then he opened Fidyka’s spine around the T9 vertebra and made almost a hundred microinjections to situate the cells above and below the wound. He placed more of the cells onto a strip of nerve tissue that he’d extracted from Fidyka’s lower leg and inserted in his spine, in order to help span the gap in his cord. Tabakow closed the incision, and within a few weeks his patient was beginning his real rehabilitation.

    OK. I hope they quickly find a couple of more patients with knife wounds. Maybe they will show some improvement, as Darek has. I predict it will be difficult to prove it was the olfactory cells and not the nerve graft or even the heavy duty PT that did the trick. Certainly one of the major confounding factors in moving this work forward is how the olfactory bulb cells are harvested. Darek consented to have his skull opened to access the bulbs. It's hard to imagine that’s going to be the standard of care. Raisman and Tabakow have been experimenting with cadavers to get at the olfactory bulb by way of an eyebrow incision (also known as
    keyhole supraorbital craniotomy), which is somewhat less gnarly. Future wise, both suggest this treatment can be applied to people with more normal contusion injuries, once they work out a few more details.

    LINK

    So do you understand the difference between olfactory mucosa and olfactory buld? I have had the impression you don't unless english is not your first language
    In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by paolocipolla View Post
    So do you understand the difference between olfactory mucosa and olfactory buld? I have had the impression you don't unless english is not your first language
    I don't know. You're the only one that has buld that I know of.
    Last edited by GRAMMY; 03-13-2016 at 01:35 PM.

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by GRAMMY View Post
    I don't know. You're the only one that has buld that I know of.
    Ok, finally you admit your ignorance on an issue.. then you may want to read some papers about olfactory mucosa cells and olfactory bulb cells before posting more miseducating information on this line of research (they are all in english and many are open access, so just read carefully before posting).
    In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

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