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  1. #1

    rollercoaster

    So can quads, or any sci patient for that matter, go on roller coasters? Assuming people would help you on and were allowed to, I mean physically capable. My blood pressure is so so which made me wonder if the inertia would cause me to pass out or something

  2. #2
    Senior Member jschism's Avatar
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    I've rode over 50 different coasters as a para. No one helps me get on or off, but I've seen others that ride with help. My back is what gets to bothering me, but I'm also getting older

  3. #3
    Probably depends some on your specific issues. I've ridden roller coasters/other stuff. I hope to go skydiving someday if I can get some pain under control.
    Jason

    C5/6 Complete - water skiing accident 1994.

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    I'm t-10 complete and rode a coaster in DisneyWorld. Mistake indeed. Killed my back and because I didn't use a padded surface or even my cushion (feat of losing it) I had a horrible bruise on my left ischium. So much so I decided to just stay in bed in hotel on one day of my trip. I didn't want to risk getting a pressure wound.

  5. #5
    I'm a T6 I use a jay protector. Hardest part is getting on and off.

  6. #6
    Senior Member brian's Avatar
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    Do not go on older coasters with a single lap bar unless you have serious arm and hand muscles. I've been on a few and almost fell out. AB people can use the muscles in their legs to anchor themselves under the bar. We can't do that.

    I repeat: Do not go on older coasters with a single lap bar unless you have serious arm and hand muscles.

  7. #7
    Senior Member jschism's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brian View Post
    Do not go on older coasters with a single lap bar unless you have serious arm and hand muscles. I've been on a few and almost fell out. AB people can use the muscles in their legs to anchor themselves under the bar. We can't do that.

    I repeat: Do not go on older coasters with a single lap bar unless you have serious arm and hand muscles.
    most have an additional seat belt, anymore. Also, I see people pass out, go limp, and they don't fall out. So while some sort of leg movement might make you feel more secure, as long as you have all your limbs, you shouldn't fall out by design. Big restrictions are just whether your body can handle it.

  8. #8
    Senior Member brian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jschism View Post
    as long as you have all your limbs, you shouldn't fall out by design.
    It almost happened to me. Twice.
    Believe me, it's real. Sometimes there's a lot of room between you and the lap bar.

    Be careful out there.

  9. #9
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    I'm a C6-7 and have ridden several at King's Island in Cincinnati. I second the lap belt only concern, scary!!! And even with the full pull down bar one needs to be concerned about low side walls on the cars. My wife had to hold one of my legs in on the Flight of Fear or my lower leg would probably have been forcibly removed. Friends/family helped me in/out. Not sure the parks allow that anymore.

  10. #10
    My husband is a t-2 para complete. We just got back from Disney World. He rode the barnstormer (a kid roller coaster, but super fast). After that he opted not to ride on any thrill rides. Even with complete arm strength, he really felt like he was going to fall out. There is a difference between fun fear and full on "I might die" fear. He also didn't ride any rides he needed a lot of help getting in and out of like he did the barnstormer. I can lift him, but it made him uncomfortable (I am not sure if it was just to much trouble, or if it was having to stop the whole ride and people waiting on him or him worrying he might break his leg again).

    He did later go on a star wars thing...he really enjoyed it. We were belted in. It was 3-D and the room moved. I had my feet firmly planted on the ground so I knew we weren't moving as much as it felt like we were. But he held on for dear life.

    I'd imagine quads could go on some rides. But I think a lot of planning would have to go into it. As well as maybe a talk with your doc about your over all health and the "thrill".

    Disney world is a great place for people with disabilities. There are a lot of rides that you can roll onto, or slide transfer onto. The staff is very well trained on disabilities. Its a nice vacation for people with disabilities. But most of the thrill rides require a more difficult transfer. Staff won't help, you have to have a companion to help.
    - Moody

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