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Thread: Transferring into your Handcycle and Back - any Tips and Techniques

  1. #11
    Do you have full Triceps and arms/hands? If so I would try and stay away from a lift unless your level of injury requires it. If your injury permits the use of your upper arms to there fullest then work on getting in and out. Reason being its like a slide board you don't want to get accustomed to using a device like that if at all possible. The idea is if you can you want to be independent and that is just something else you have to also take with you if you go Race or ride somewhere else.

    Before I get jumped on if you don't have full function then do whatever you have to do to get out and ride.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by crash86 View Post
    Do you have full Triceps and arms/hands? If so I would try and stay away from a lift unless your level of injury requires it. If your injury permits the use of your upper arms to there fullest then work on getting in and out. Reason being its like a slide board you don't want to get accustomed to using a device like that if at all possible. The idea is if you can you want to be independent and that is just something else you have to also take with you if you go Race or ride somewhere else.

    Before I get jumped on if you don't have full function then do whatever you have to do to get out and ride.
    I have full triceps/biceps and use of hands, but still working on floor to chair transfers. Besides the SCI from my accident just over a year ago, I broke many ribs and both scapula and overall had a lot of muscle atrophy while laid up - so range of motion and strength are still very much a work in progress and I'm leery of pushing my shoulders too hard / too fast. If I did get a bath lift or table, I'm hoping that I can use it to get out and ride and then try to continue working on transfers to be independent over the long run. Something like the Ikea step that NW-Will mentions might be a good thing to work toward.

  3. #13
    Yes do what you need to do and if its something you can use until you get your strength back go for it. I have been hurt for 28yrs and have been where things where very difficult from surgery's , illness but i always worked myself back into shape. I guess what im saying just don't let it become a crutch if at all possible. Just have to fight like hell!
    Good luck and you will find what works best for you.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by crash86 View Post
    Yes do what you need to do and if its something you can use until you get your strength back go for it. I have been hurt for 28yrs and have been where things where very difficult from surgery's , illness but i always worked myself back into shape. I guess what im saying just don't let it become a crutch if at all possible. Just have to fight like hell!
    Good luck and you will find what works best for you.
    So true!!

  5. #15
    Senior Member NW-Will's Avatar
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    haven't tried this footstool, but looks promising because of the higher handle holds.. maybe worth a look if you're at Ikea ..


    http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/20201738/

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by NW-Will View Post
    haven't tried this footstool, but looks promising because of the higher handle holds.. maybe worth a look if you're at Ikea ...
    This would be a good design if the dimensions were a bit more generous (it's 15" wide and I'm a bit more generous...). I like the handholds and the idea of being able to step up though. Your earlier idea of the Ikea stool seems promising. The current version at Ikea is 10" high. It would be very portable and has anti-skid feet. The other idea I had was cutting down the legs of a wooden chair by about 6" or so - I'd just need to get some rubber tips for the legs to make it a bit more stable.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by NW-Will View Post
    Do the same as this, with Ikea foot stools.


    I use one like that to get off the ground sometimes when I'm gardening. I
    find it has a tendency to tip if I'm not real careful transferring. This round design might be more stable:
    http://www.homedepot.com/p/Xtend-Cli...-961/203024262
    I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

  8. #18
    As an update (sorry it took a while), I ended up purchasing a bathtub lift to help with the transfers. It's been working well. I find it easier to not take the lift all the way down - so I have the benefit of gravity when getting into the cycle and push my way up a bit on the way out. Perhaps someday (as my shoulders get stronger) I'll be able to go without, but it works well for now. The lift folds down for travel, only weighs 20lbs, and can go from 2.5 inches to 18 inches.

    Thanks everyone for all your input!
    Last edited by HockeyFan; 06-05-2016 at 12:01 AM.

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