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Thread: My response to "handicap parking" abusers!

  1. #21
    Senior Member pfcs49's Avatar
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    I always said "better pissed off than pissed on".

    Guess it's time to re-think this.

  2. #22
    I'm always a little baffled how many people argue with me about how we are on equal terms as our able-bodied counterparts even though we are paralyzed, yet they freak out when they don't get the closest parking spot to the door or the handicap button doesn't work or the ramps not just right etc etc I park where is Open just like anybody and I would never lower myself to complain about it, for God sakes I'm an electric wheelchair takes far less effort for me to drive across the parking lot then someone that is walking.

  3. #23
    I decided to let it go..let them off, ask God to forgive them. That little kid is going to be able to do one heck of a "long shot" when he gets to Junior High (what we used to do, shoot long for the urinals.) And I tell myself..Jake? Merde' happens (it's not offensive if you say it in a language that's not your mother tongue.)

    Quote Originally Posted by pfcs49 View Post
    I always said "better pissed off than pissed on".

    Guess it's time to re-think this.

  4. #24
    Senior Member Oddity's Avatar
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    Class A #1 bonafide PRICK right here! Parked across TWO handicap parking spots in a shiny new Maserati, with 90 day tags, at my local music store.




    We parked in one of the spots anyway. Squeezed on in there. Saw the shitty look on his face, like, "WTF do you think you're doing?!?", until he saw my chair come out. Priceless. Took off quickly after that.

    Douchebag.
    "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

    "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

    "Even what those with the greatest reputation for knowing it all claim to understand and defend are but opinions..." -Heraclitus, Fragments

  5. #25
    Senior Member darty's Avatar
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    I am in a power chair also so close is not the issue. Safety is the issue passing behind all those cars backing up and zipping around the parking lot. I am probably 4' tall in my chair and no one is paying attention, they are looking for other cars not wheelchairs. I have almost been run over several times and then as I approach the front where the handicapped spots are I see someone effortlessly exit a car and quickly walk to the door. Just fry's my ass!!! After all my picture is on the sign...



    Quote Originally Posted by JamesMcM View Post
    I'm always a little baffled how many people argue with me about how we are on equal terms as our able-bodied counterparts even though we are paralyzed, yet they freak out when they don't get the closest parking spot to the door or the handicap button doesn't work or the ramps not just right etc etc I park where is Open just like anybody and I would never lower myself to complain about it, for God sakes I'm an electric wheelchair takes far less effort for me to drive across the parking lot then someone that is walking.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    ^^(A)^^

  6. #26
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    After reading and rereading some of the older posts about parking issues, i realize we are as critical as anyone else about; who uses HP Placards! None of us ever walk in another man's shoes. We know nothing about what is wrong or not wrong with them. I can only testify that I did resist getting or using a HP Placard, even when I could walk some distance unassisted, but it was an adventure for me to do that.

    I have since learned those years of being stubborn, and not accepting, and in fact maybe not doing enough to alleviate the physical problems, have created more problems to my body and the SCI by further damaging spine by compensating for my physical inabilities.

    How does this have anything to do with Parking placards, you ask? Well maybe "some" of those people who do have placards and we do not understand, why they have it. Just think that they "may" have some hidden fault and are disguising it somehow. But we must be less critical of people and deciding ourselves whether or not someone deserves to have and use a placard or not.

    Of course there is no excuse for having your kid pee on someone, that's just plain rude. Or using two parking places, parking in the crosshatch area, etc, those things are driving offenses and bad drivers.

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by darty View Post
    I am in a power chair also so close is not the issue. Safety is the issue passing behind all those cars backing up and zipping around the parking lot. I am probably 4' tall in my chair and no one is paying attention, they are looking for other cars not wheelchairs. I have almost been run over several times and then as I approach the front where the handicapped spots are I see someone effortlessly exit a car and quickly walk to the door. Just fry's my ass!!! After all my picture is on the sign...

    Really... you're absolutely right people aren't looking for wheelchairs! and guess what for 99.99% of people they never are going to be looking for wheelchairs, as the person in a wheelchair it's your responsibility to realize that fact, and pay closer attention! For God sakes man it's a parking lot, not the front lines...

  8. #28
    Senior Member darty's Avatar
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    I think you missed my point. I am very careful and have not been hit in 35 years but the purpose of parking up close is to "allow for save ingress and egress" I believe is how the ADA words it. They don't put handicapped parking up close for convenience it's for safety.
    ^^(A)^^

  9. #29
    Safety is a factor in the placement of handicapped parking spaces close to building entrances, but not the only factor. According to the ADA, handicapped parking spaces should be located on the shortest accessible route to building entrances to accommodate impairments caused by disabilities. Disabilities are defined as:

    • Visual acuity of 20/200 or less in the better eye with correcting lenses
    • Visual acuity of more than 20/200 but with a limited field of vision in which the widest diameter of the visual field subtends an angle of 20 degrees or less
    • Mobility problems that substantially impair a person's ability to move around; these problems can be caused by:
      • Paralysis
      • Lung disease
      • Cardiac deficiency
      • Wheelchair confinement
      • Arthritis
      • Foot disorder
      • Other medical condition causing a person to use a brace, cane, crutch or other assistive device.



    In other words, the shortest accessible path to a building entrance makes it easier for people with disabilities to traverse distances. Handicapped parking is an accommodation of convenience for people with disabilities. That convenience factor is the biggest reason for the abuse of these spaces.

    All the best,
    GJ

  10. #30
    Just reading this in our local newspaper today:

    Calif. Assemblyman Gatto Introduces Legislation to Curb Fraudulent Disability Placard Use – AB 2602

    By Christopher Simmons -
    Mar 15, 2016
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    SACRAMENTO, Calif. /California Newswire/ — Today, Calif. Assemblyman Mike Gatto (D-Los Angeles) introduced legislation to address the illegal use of disabled parking placards in cities across California. According to Gatto, there are approximately three million disabled parking placards in use in California – in other words, one in every eight drivers has one. While placards are most often used responsibly and for legitimate reasons, irresponsible and fraudulent placard use has become a significant concern.
    AB 2602 will force the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) to proactively retrieve expired parking placards, require individuals to reapply for parking placards upon expiration, and allow local jurisdictions to charge motorists displaying placards for the cost of parking, as long as the city offers sufficient, genuine parking options for disabled individuals.
    “California has been a leader among the states in providing equal opportunities to individuals with disabilities,” said Gatto. “However, there are people who are trying to game the system and are taking parking away for every person struggling with a disability.”
    Multiple news investigations have caught swindlers in the Los Angeles area using placards belonging to friends and relatives, including a deceased relative and a disabled sibling. Other investigative reports showed hidden-camera footage of people fraudulently using placards at an airport, at meters in front of the gym they worked out, and of a man selling placards on Craigslist.
    “AB 2602 will benefit the disabled by making sure that those who genuinely need a parking spot have access to one, instead of that spot being taken up by someone committing fraud on the system,” Gatto stated. “This is an important bill for making sure our parking system is fair for everyone.”
    Mike Gatto is the Chairman of the Utilities & Commerce Committee and the longest-serving current member of the State Assembly. He represents California’s 43rd Assembly District, which includes Los Angeles, Glendale and Burbank. www.asm.ca.gov/gatto



    Will disabled placard abuse undermine Sacramento city parking plan?

    State law allows cars with blue placard to park for free at meters
    Officials say placard abuse by nondisabled people downtown is a problem
    Other concerns raised about city plan to extend downtown meter hours










    By Tony Bizjak
    tbizjak@sacbee.com


    Illegal use of disabled placards, considered widespread in downtown Sacramento, could hamper the city’s efforts to modernize its downtown parking programs, several city officials said this week.
    That concern was among several surfacing this week around the city’s planned downtown parking changes. With the downtown arena opening set for October, the Sacramento City Council on Tuesday gave its parking staff the go-ahead to begin a seven-month process of extending most downtown parking meter hours to 10 p.m. Currently, most meters operate until 6 p.m.
    The change will prompt more drivers to use city garages, officials said, potentially freeing up some meters for shorter-term parking and reducing the amount of block circling that drivers do. The plan has prompted debate and concerns on several fronts.
    The system will not work if people can use those placards and park anywhere at a meter all day and all night.
    Sacramento City Councilman Larry Carr

    Council member Eric Guerra said later meter hours will be a burden on people who want to participate in local government, such as attending City Council meetings that begin at 6 p.m. In response, city parking staff said they will look into a parking validation program.
    A restaurant coalition representative said business owners are concerned about impacts on patrons.

    “We have to make needed changes in a way that doesn’t price out the ability for a family to go downtown, grab a bite to eat and attend a Kings game,” Josh Wood said.
    The council told staff to refrain from imposing later meter hours in midtown and on the R Street Corridor until city staff and restaurant representatives can consult.
    One of the unknowns is what effect the state’s disabled placard parking laws will have on the city’s plans to use meters for revenue enhancement at night and to achieve a high turnover rate at those meters.
    Under state law, vehicles with blue placards can park for free at meters, with no time limit. Officials in several large cities contend their downtowns are burdened by placard misuse by people who are not disabled. Drivers can obtain placards from the DMV by presenting a form with a signature from their doctor or a few others in the health care field.
    “Unlimited use of the placards is going to blow this out of the water,” Councilman Larry Carr predicted Tuesday. “The system will not work if people can use those placards and park anywhere at a meter all day and all night.”
    A city survey several years ago on several blocks of N Street near the Capitol found 73 percent of parking spots occupied by cars with blue placards. Many were parked most of the day, suggesting they belonged to downtown workers. A later Bee survey found 45 percent of vehicles parked on L and N streets surrounding the Capitol had placards.
    “People are stealing parking from our mobility needful folks,” City Public Works Chief Jerry Way said. The city employs two placard abuse traffic officers, but officials say it is hard under current law to catch and cite people. The city has issued an average of about nine such citations a month over the past year.
    A bill recently introduced in the state Assembly could, if passed, alleviate Sacramento’s concerns.
    The bill, AB 2602, by Assemblyman Mike Gatto of Los Angeles and Burbank, would allow cities to require that people with disabled placards pay for meters and not stay longer than the meter’s posted limit as long as the city “makes all reasonable accommodations, including the provision of free parking for individuals who, by virtue of their disability, are unable to insert payment into a parking meter.”
    The bill also will require users to apply for renewal when their placards expire. Currently, the renewal is automatic.
    Officials at Disability Rights California, an advocacy group, say they have not yet reviewed the Gatto bill. However, disability community advocates have in the past questioned how rampant placard abuse is, and have encouraged cities to put more effort into cracking down on placard abusers rather than changing the law.
    At Councilman Steve Hansen’s request, the council extended parking enforcement to 10 p.m. in all central city residential neighborhoods to reduce the likelihood that people will park in front of residences to avoid paying at meters.
    Typically, nonresidents are allowed to park for two hours or less in residential areas where parking restrictions apply. City officials say they are working on an online system that will allow residents to more easily obtain temporary visitor parking permits for their guests.
    Parking division chief Matt Eierman said his group will begin changing some meters’ hours to 10 p.m. in the next few weeks.
    A significant element of the program is implementation of a meter tool called SpotZone, which will allow drivers to pay, either at the meter or remotely via smartphone, for extra hours beyond the meter’s regular hour limit. That will allow drivers to stay at two-hour meters for three or more hours at higher prices for extra hours. Those drivers likely instead will choose to park in a city garage, where rates are lower, Eierman said.







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