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Thread: Flu Season 2015-2016

  1. #1

    Flu Season 2015-2016

    Everyone 6 months and older should get an annual flu vaccine. It takes about two weeks after vaccination for your body to develop full protection against the flu. Get vaccinated to protect yourself and your loved ones!

    Remember that pulmonary infections and respiratory failure remain the #1 cause of death long-term in SCI, and it is very easy for the flu to turn into pneumonia or ARDS for someone with a SCI.
    Every year, 40,000 people in the USA die from seasonal flu. While the flu shot is not a 100% guarantee you will not get the flu, if you do, and were immunized, it will be less severe. Shorter days and cooler evenings. It is fall?and often the time that we start seeing people get sick with flu. By getting a flu vaccine for yourself and your entire family every season, you can help prevent flu-related illness, missed school and work and even more serious flu-related illness.
    Influenza (flu) is a contagious respiratory disease that infects the nose, throat, and lungs and can lead to serious complications, hospitalization, or even death. Pneumonia and bronchitis are examples of serious flu-related complications. The flu also can cause certain health conditions, like diabetes, asthma, and heart and lung disease, to become worse. Even healthy people can become sick with the flu and experience serious complications. But even if you are one of the lucky ones who bounces back quickly from a bout with the flu, people around you might not be so lucky. Getting a flu vaccine is the single best way to protect yourself and your family from this serious disease.

    Everyone Needs a Flu Vaccine Every Flu Season
    Flu viruses are constantly changing, and different flu viruses can circulate and cause illness each season. Flu vaccines are made each year to protect against the flu viruses that research indicates will be most common. Also, immunity from vaccination declines after a year. This is why everyone needs a flu vaccine every season.

    While everyone 6 months and older should get a flu vaccine this season with rare exception, it's especially important for some people to get vaccinated.

    Most people who get the flu will have mild illness, will not need medical care or antiviral drugs, and will recover in less than two weeks. Some people, however, are more likely to get flu complications that result in being hospitalized and occasionally result in death. Pneumonia, bronchitis, sinus infections and ear infections are examples of flu-related complications. The flu also can make chronic health problems worse.


    People who have medical conditions including:

    • Asthma
    • Neurological and neurodevelopmental conditions [including disorders of the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerve, and muscle such as cerebral palsy, epilepsy (seizure disorders), stroke, intellectual disability (mental retardation), moderate to severe developmental delay, muscular dystrophy, or spinal cord injury].
    • Chronic lung disease (such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD] and cystic fibrosis)
    • Heart disease (such as congenital heart disease, congestive heart failure and coronary artery disease)
    • Blood disorders (such as sickle cell disease)
    • Endocrine disorders (such as diabetes mellitus)
    • Kidney disorders
    • Liver disorders
    • Metabolic disorders (such as inherited metabolic disorders and mitochondrial disorders)
    • Weakened immune system due to disease or medication (such as people with HIV or AIDS or cancer, or those on chronic steroids)
    • People younger than 19 years of age who are receiving long-term aspirin therapy
    • People who are morbidly obese (BMI 40 or greater)


    Note
    : There is no recommendation for pregnant women or people with pre-existing medical conditions to seek special permission or secure written consent from their doctor for influenza vaccination if they get vaccinated at a worksite clinic, pharmacy or other location outside of their physician's office.

    Also, it is generally recommended that people with SCI get the HIGH DOSE version of the flu vaccination which is also recommended for those over the age of 65. Read more here: http://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/vaccine/qa_fluzone.htm

    It is also highly encouraged that your family and caregivers get their flu vaccine as well. Not only will this help protect you from the flu, but it will keep them healthy and able to provide you with the care you need during the coming flu season.

    (KLD)

  2. #2
    Bump.

    (KLD)

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