Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Paralysis: primates recover better than rodents

  1. #1

    Thumbs up Paralysis: primates recover better than rodents

    Monkeys and humans exhibit greater motor recovery than rats after similar spinal cord injury, according to a study conducted in Gregoire Courtine's lab at EPFL. The identification of this primate-specific mechanism of recovery has major implications for future research. Using primate models rather than rat models will improve the design of therapies to repair the human spinal cord and increase the accuracy of predictive models of recovery. The study results have been published in Science Translational Medicine.

    LINK
    Last edited by GRAMMY; 08-28-2015 at 12:44 PM. Reason: spelling

  2. #2
    There is no way to predict how experiments in rats will translate to humans.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    4,993
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    There is no way to predict how experiments in rats will translate to humans.
    Then why torture the rats at all?!?

  4. #4
    Senior Member Tbone57's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Staten Island, NY
    Posts
    157
    Not to mention the amount of time saved also

  5. #5
    Senior Member khmorgan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    South Florida
    Posts
    366
    Quote Originally Posted by nrf View Post
    Then why torture the rats at all?!?
    It's cheaper to test potential therapies on animals than humans, and they don't have lawyers. However, as noted above, you have to understand when you are testing on the wrong animal. Of course, while rodents might not be a good indicator of how well a therapy will work on human motor functions, it might provide a cheap method of indicating the toxicity of a therapy.

    That is, you might test rodents to determine if a therapy kills animals, and then move to higher primates to test for motor function improvement.

    Personally, I fear that some researchers think of publishing a paper as the goal of their research, and leave the clinical trials to others. Unfortunately, not many people want to do the high risk, expensive, hard work of clinical trials just for the privilege of paying the researcher royalties.

    Also, they can publish a paper and claim it is the solution to the problem as long as they are never proven wrong in clinical trials.

  6. #6
    Senior Member lynnifer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Windsor ON Canada
    Posts
    19,320
    And then comes along PETA ...
    Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

    T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by khmorgan View Post
    It's cheaper to test potential therapies on animals than humans, and they don't have lawyers. However, as noted above, you have to understand when you are testing on the wrong animal. Of course, while rodents might not be a good indicator of how well a therapy will work on human motor functions, it might provide a cheap method of indicating the toxicity of a therapy.

    That is, you might test rodents to determine if a therapy kills animals, and then move to higher primates to test for motor function improvement.
    Is that what the primate consortium research data indicated?

  8. #8
    I thought all the Rats were walking after SCI, at least that's what I've always seen.
    "Life is about how you
    respond to not only the
    challenges you're dealt but
    the challenges you seek...If
    you have no goals, no
    mountains to climb, your
    soul dies".~Liz Fordred

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Curt Leatherbee View Post
    I thought all the Rats were walking after SCI, at least that's what I've always seen.
    The only ones I've seen are dragging their bodies along with their forearms a bit. If they walk around after a SCI then they don't make such a good injury model??

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 11-28-2010, 04:12 PM
  2. Mannford student struggling to recover from paralysis
    By Max in forum Spinal Cord Injury News
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-13-2008, 09:53 PM
  3. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-14-2005, 09:54 AM
  4. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 11-20-2004, 08:17 AM
  5. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-02-2002, 11:17 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •