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Thread: Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Treatment of Patients with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

  1. #1

    Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Treatment of Patients with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

    "Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Treatment of Patients with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury (ASIA A) with Residual Electrophysiological Function"

    ..."We present the first patient included in our protocol of MSC application for the treatment of chronic spinal cord injurywith syringomyelic cavitation. Following 6 months follow-up, patient obtained remarkable radiological and electrophysiologicalimprovements, as well as mild motor functional recovery. He recovered paravertebral muscle control and regained postural trunkstability. "

    http://www.annexpublishers.com/full-...l-Function.php
    In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

  2. #2
    Good stuff but bone marrow derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells aren't as youthful or potent as embryonic derived msc.

    Mesenchymal Stem Cell Population Derived
    from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Displays Potent
    Immunomodulatory and Therapeutic Properties

    Erin A. Kimbrel,1 Nicholas A. Kouris,1 Gregory J. Yavanian,1 Jianlin Chu,1 Yu Qin,2 Ann Chan,2
    Ram P. Singh,3 Deborah McCurdy,3 Lynn Gordon,2 Ralph D. Levinson,2 and Robert Lanza1

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are being tested in a wide range of human diseases; however, loss of potency and inconsistent quality severely limit their use. To overcome these issues, we have utilized a developmental precursor called the hemangioblast as an intermediate cell type in the derivation of a highly potent and replenishable population of MSCs from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). This method circumvents the need for labor-intensive hand-picking, scraping, and sorting that other hESC-MSC derivation methods require. Moreover, unlike previous reports on hESC-MSCs, we have systematically evaluated their immunomodulatory properties and in vivo potency. As expected, they dynamically secrete a range of bioactive factors, display
    enzymatic activity, and suppress T-cell proliferation that is induced by either allogeneic cells or mitogenic stimuli. However, they also display unique immunophenotypic properties, as well as a smaller size and > 30,000-fold proliferative capacity than bone marrow-derived MSCs. In addition, this is the first report which demonstrates that hESC-MSCs can inhibit CD83 up-regulation and IL-12p70 secretion from dendritic cells and enhance regulatory T-cell populations induced by interleukin 2 (IL-2). This is also the first report which shows that hESC-MSCs have therapeutic efficacy in two different autoimmune disorder models, including a marked increase in survival of lupus-prone mice and a reduction of symptoms in an autoimmune model of uveitis. Our data suggest that this novel and therapeutically active population of MSCs could overcome many of the obstacles that plague the use of MSCs in regenerative medicine and serve as a scalable alternative to current MSC sources.

    Introduction

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are fibroblast-like multipotent cells that can be derived from a variety of adult and fetal tissues [eg, bone marrow (BM), fat, cord blood, etc.] as well as from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs). Currently, there are more than 300 clinical trials evaluating MSC therapeutic utility in a variety of diseases, including osteoarthritis, wound healing, degenerative disc disease, and autoimmune disorders [1]. Unlike other types of cellular therapies, MSCs can be used in allogeneic settings
    without immunosuppressive therapy due to their ability to evade immune detection [2]. Lack of co-stimulatory molecules such as CD40 and CD80 [2], as well as production of
    HLA-G, a non-classical MHC class I molecule [3], and expression of serine protease inhibitor 9 [4] may contribute to their immunoprivileged status, although the exact mechanism is not entirely clear. MSCs home to injured/inflamed tissue and are thought to provide therapeutic support through a multifaceted mechanism. They secrete a dynamic assortment of bioactive cytokines, trophic factors, and anti-inflammatory molecules such as transforming growth factor beta (TGFb) [5], monocyte chemotactic
    protein 1/chemokine (C-C motif ) ligand 2 (MCP-1/CCL2) [6], indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) [7], prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) [8], heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) [9],
    monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG), and interferon gamma (IFNg)-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) [10] in response to environmental cues. In addition to paracrine-acting factors, MSCs use direct cell-to-cell contact [3,11,12] and influence the activities of different immune cell populations [3,13–19]. They may also recruit and/or activate endogenous progenitors to facilitate tissue repair at injury sites [20,21]. Differentiation
    and long-term engraftment may be another mechanism by which MSCs contribute to tissue repair, yet this is thought to play a relatively minor role in their therapeutic activity [22,23].

    https://www.ocata.com/uploads/scient...S-DEV-2014.pdf
    "I'm manic as hell-
    But I'm goin' strong-
    Left my meds on the sink again-
    My head will be racing by lunchtime"

    <----Scott Weiland---->

  3. #3
    Pure junk! We've seen the MSC trash from Brazil a whole lot over the years but never stuff out of an annex publisher... There's a reason this is free open access. This was a waste of reading time. Total nonsense. I hate to see this kind of silly trash posted on the forum just because it was dug up off the internet somewhere with the word "SCI" attached to it..

    "Criteria for selecting the one patient"... (In other words, it won't do a thing to cure an actual SCI if you read what they've written below...)

    "Ideal candidates for neuroregenerative treatment with MSCs are patients with cervical or thoracic spinal cord injuries who have a "discomplete clinical syndrome" (with electromyographic evidence of residual suprasegmental activity) and MRI showing syringomyelic cavitation at the level of spinal cord injury (without glial scars or other spinal cord damage or compression). Unfortunately, in order to guarantee anatomical viability to intramedullary MSC infusion (syringomyelia), most SCI patients would not be eligible to this treatment. Some confounding factors (such as the presence of SCI with incomplete clinical syndrome and other types of spinal cord damage) served as exclusion criteria in our study, since in these cases, it is impossible to attribute sensorimotor improvement exclusively to the neuroregenerative treatment. Patients with incomplete lesions could display sensorimotor improvement thanks to physical therapy or even to the natural progression of the disease, as has been observed in patients with central cord lesions. Patients with other spinal compressions could be benefiting from a specific surgical treatment, thus distorting the effects of the neuroregenerative treatment."
    Furthermore, patients with complete spinal cord lesions who meet all the clinical and neurophysiological criteria (i.e., complete loss of motor control and sensibility below the level of the lesion), with electromyographic silence (without supraspinal signals or conscious influence on spinal reflexes), should also be excluded from neuroregenerative treatments with MSCs.
    Last edited by GRAMMY; 08-25-2015 at 09:20 AM.

  4. #4
    Took the words right out of my mouth Grammy!

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by GRAMMY View Post
    Pure junk! We've seen the MSC trash from Brazil a whole lot over the years but never stuff out of an annex publisher... There's a reason this is free open access. This was a waste of reading time. Total nonsense. I hate to see this kind of silly trash posted on the forum just because it was dug up off the internet somewhere with the word "SCI" attached to it..

    "Criteria for selecting the one patient"... (In other words, it won't do a thing to cure an actual SCI if you read what they've written below...)

    "Ideal candidates for neuroregenerative treatment with MSCs are patients with cervical or thoracic spinal cord injuries who have a "discomplete clinical syndrome" (with electromyographic evidence of residual suprasegmental activity) and MRI showing syringomyelic cavitation at the level of spinal cord injury (without glial scars or other spinal cord damage or compression). Unfortunately, in order to guarantee anatomical viability to intramedullary MSC infusion (syringomyelia), most SCI patients would not be eligible to this treatment. Some confounding factors (such as the presence of SCI with incomplete clinical syndrome and other types of spinal cord damage) served as exclusion criteria in our study, since in these cases, it is impossible to attribute sensorimotor improvement exclusively to the neuroregenerative treatment. Patients with incomplete lesions could display sensorimotor improvement thanks to physical therapy or even to the natural progression of the disease, as has been observed in patients with central cord lesions. Patients with other spinal compressions could be benefiting from a specific surgical treatment, thus distorting the effects of the neuroregenerative treatment."
    Furthermore, patients with complete spinal cord lesions who meet all the clinical and neurophysiological criteria (i.e., complete loss of motor control and sensibility below the level of the lesion), with electromyographic silence (without supraspinal signals or conscious influence on spinal reflexes), should also be excluded from neuroregenerative treatments with MSCs.
    I think many people were/are interested in your opinion about this study. If I didn't post it you could not have provided it.
    In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

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