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Thread: Titanium vs Aluminium.

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Creaking Gate View Post
    They look good, but also quite heavy and expensive, and seeing as I've only got skinny arms. I think they will too much weight to my chair.
    I would say they are a long way from "quite heavy". While they will be heavier than some small, skinny castors, they are not that heavy and have many benefits. They are a popular option by many members on here.
    C5-6 Complete - 8/13/1982

  2. #22
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    FYI:

    Suspension forks like Frog Legs or TiLite Slipstream are heavier than std forks. Combined with heavier casters like the softroll type, the weight may be significant for someone to whom arm strength is at a premium. However, there may be some benefit to using a different caster, even with the weight gain.

    All casters pictured are 4" diameter.

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  3. #23
    No doubt weight can add up, but IMO 1 of those is a good all-purpose caster. If the additional weight is "significant" enough to be too much strength wise, I suspect they would be using a power chair. That said, I can certainly understand someone not wanting the added weight, more so with the forks, which I use.

    Reading how the poster uses their chair, I would not rule out FL casters for their function; specifically stating they only use the chair outside; those skinny and hard wheels suck outside.
    C5-6 Complete - 8/13/1982

  4. #24
    Senior Member NW-Will's Avatar
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    Be interested to hear anyone who has tried those 4" Scooter wheels, especially how they compare to the common soft roll.

    I can imagine them sliding quite easily on slick surfaces while you transfer?

    Quote Originally Posted by ala View Post
    FYI:

    Suspension forks like Frog Legs or TiLite Slipstream are heavier than std forks. Combined with heavier casters like the softroll type, the weight may be significant for someone to whom arm strength is at a premium. However, there may be some benefit to using a different caster, even with the weight gain.

    All casters pictured are 4" diameter.

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Size:  92.1 KB

  5. #25
    they are hard but have some grip, like inline skate wheels

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by ala View Post
    FYI:

    Suspension forks like Frog Legs or TiLite Slipstream are heavier than std forks. Combined with heavier casters like the softroll type, the weight may be significant for someone to whom arm strength is at a premium. However, there may be some benefit to using a different caster, even with the weight gain.

    All casters pictured are 4" diameter.

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    What/who is the source of these weights?

  7. #27
    Fwiw:

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    Chas
    TiLite TR3
    Dual-Axle TR3 with RioMobility DragonFly
    I am a person with mild/moderate hexaparesis (impaired movement in 4 limbs, head, & torso) caused by RRMS w/TM C7&T7 incomplete.

    "I know you think you understand what you thought I said, but what I don't think you realize is that what you heard is not what I meant."
    <
    UNKNOWN AUTHOR>

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by stephen212 View Post
    What/who is the source of these weights?
    I am the source. I weighed them myself today with a digital scale.

    Quote Originally Posted by NW-Will View Post
    Be interested to hear anyone who has tried those 4" Scooter wheels, especially how they compare to the common soft roll.
    I can imagine them sliding quite easily on slick surfaces while you transfer?
    I have used two sets of these razor scooter wheels over the years on two different chairs (Kuschall and Colours Eclipse). They may look jelly like, but they are very firm. They also roll along a very thin track. Look carefully at the wear along the crown of the polyurethane wheel pictured. It actually only measures about 5mm wide. These things are cheap, come in colors (even lighted), have very good bearings, are long wearing, and difficult to damage. I used to buy them in pairs for $10-$15, and they came with bearings and an allen wrench. The 4" size (sold as 98-100mm) is very responsive on hard surfaces and glides effortlessly. They are poor on carpeted surfaces, however. They are nothing like soft rolls. There is no smoothing or cushioning effect. I've never had much problem while transferring. But they are smooth polyurethane, so you can imagine they have their limits on very smooth wet surfaces, especially while turning fast. I have heard of many wheelchair users using these.

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  9. #29
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    I should also note that razor scooter wheels are very bad on rough surfaces like gravel. And they are horrendous in dirt or on grass. Transfers on smooth hard surfaces might not be bad, but beware in dirt or grass. The little buggers with dig in like a spade creating furrows. I can't tell you how many times I have flipped forward out of my chair reaching down for something in the yard. To add injury to insult, I've had my chair flip on top of me while trying to transfer back from sitting on the ground. And when I've had to park my car in soft grass, they would bury themselves up to the bearings when I put weight on them to transfer.

  10. #30
    I've got 3" razors on the chair that stays indoors. That chair runs almost exclusively on hardwood floors. Those wheels are perfect for that purpose IMHO. I have them on another chair which also sometimes needs to go outside, not so much fun, need to keep them wheelied alot outside.
    I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

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