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Thread: High Blood Pressure, Urine Issues

  1. #1

    High Blood Pressure, Urine Issues

    Hello,
    I'm a bit baffled as to what to do as is my mother (Whom is a nurse). I had been having bladder problems. We went to our doctor and had him check for stones. He said there were none. Much to my surprise as everyone. We thought it was a urine infection and went to the doctor for that. He said there's no infection. We came home and things have gotten worse. There is urine coming out of the penis and around the tubing. The blood pressure is very high in which we are taking drops to get it down. We've changed the catheter a couple times. So a bit hellish the last couple of days. It's just very painful with a high blood pressure (Up into the 200s) and urine going everywhere. We do have some antibiotics and are slowly going trying them. They are for Urine infections. Such as Bactrim And a few others. Worth a try, I guess.. We will call our doctor tomorrow that deals with bladder infections And see what he suggest. I just didn't know if anyone has experienced this and what they did to solve it.

    Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.
    Brian
    "Life's a Party and Your Not Invited"

  2. #2
    How did your doctor determine you do not have a UTI? What tests did he do? How quickly did he have the results?

    How do you have unprescribed antibiotics laying around?? This is dangerous, and appears to indicate you did not take your full course with a previous infection.

    Untreated autonomic dysreflexia can kill you. What "drops" are you taking? Have you gone to the emergency room or contacted your primary care physician or covering physician (on call)?

    (KLD)

  3. #3
    As for the UTI. They did a urine culture and took a couple days. As for antibiotics, we use them until prior infections went away and or they switched antibiotics which left us with some stock. So we had some leftover, my mom is a nurse And she knows quite a bit. Being an RN for 25 years. We have been doing fine for about 20 years now. So we do have some experience. As for autonomic dysreflexia. We are taking some Procardia drops that reduce the blood pressure. The doctor recommended it and it has worked well. No we haven't gone to the emergency room or contacted our primary care physician. We'll do that tomorrow. I'm just going to grin and bear it until we figure things out.. But thanks for the reply.
    Last edited by MagikLair; 06-02-2015 at 01:37 AM.
    "Life's a Party and Your Not Invited"

  4. #4
    Patient information: High blood pressure emergencies (The Basics)
    Written by the doctors and editors at UpToDate

    What is a high blood pressure emergency? ? A high blood pressure emergency is a serious ? and even life-threatening ? condition that can happen when a person's blood pressure gets much higher than normal. When a person's blood pressure gets very high, it can lead to problems in one or more of the following organs:
    ●Eyes ? Problems can include bleeding in the back of the eye, or swelling of the nerve that runs from the eye to the brain.
    ●Brain ? Problems can include swelling or bleeding in the brain, or a stroke. A stroke is when part of the brain is injured because it goes without blood for too long.
    ●Kidneys ? Very high blood pressure can lead to kidney failure, which is when the kidneys stop working.
    ●Heart ? Heart problems can include a heart attack, heart failure, or damage to a major blood vessel.
    When your doctor or nurse tells you your blood pressure, he or she says 2 numbers. For example, your doctor might say that your blood pressure is "140 over 90." When people have a high blood pressure emergency, their blood pressure is usually "180 over 120" or higher.
    Other terms doctors might use for a high blood pressure emergency are "hypertensive emergency" or "malignant hypertension."
    Sometimes, a person's blood pressure is much higher than normal, but it hasn't damaged any organs. Doctors call this "hypertensive urgency." Hypertensive urgency is not usually treated the same as a high blood pressure emergency.

    What are the symptoms of a high blood pressure emergency?
    ? The symptoms depend on the organ or organs affected. They can include:
    ●Blurry vision or other vision changes
    ●Headache
    ●Nausea or vomiting
    ●Confusion
    ●Passing out or seizures ? Seizures are waves of abnormal electrical activity in the brain that can make people move or behave strangely.
    ●Weakness or numbness on one side of the body, or in one arm or leg
    ●Difficulty talking
    ●Trouble breathing
    ●Chest pain
    ●Pain in the upper back or between the shoulders
    ●Urine that is brown or bloody
    ●Pain when urinating
    ●Pain in the lower back or on the side of the body

    Should I see a doctor or nurse?
    ? Yes. Call your doctor or nurse right away if you have any of the symptoms listed above, especially if you know that you have high blood pressure.

    Will I need tests?
    ? Yes. Your doctor or nurse will ask about your symptoms, do an exam, and check your blood pressure. He or she might use a special light to look in the back of your eyes.
    Your doctor will also do tests to check how serious your condition is. Tests can include:
    ●Blood tests
    ●Urine tests
    ●A chest X-ray
    ●A CT scan or other imaging test of your brain ? Imaging tests create pictures of the inside of the body.
    ●A CT scan or other imaging test of your chest
    ●An ECG (also called an "electrocardiogram" or "EKG") ? This test measures the electrical activity in your heart (figure 1).

    How is a high blood pressure emergency treated?
    ? A high blood pressure emergency is treated in the hospital. Your doctor will give you medicines to lower your blood pressure quickly. These medicines usually go into your vein through a tube called an "IV."
    Your doctor will also treat any problems caused by your very high blood pressure, if they can be treated.
    People who have a high blood pressure emergency usually need long-term treatment to keep their blood pressure under control. This usually includes:
    ●Taking medicines
    ●Following a low-salt diet that includes a lot of fruits and vegetables
    ●Losing weight (if you are overweight)
    ●Getting regular exercise


    The above is patient information retrieved from uptodate.com on 6/2/2015.



    If you have not yet visited your doctor when you read this, I think you should. At the least you should give them a call. Blood pressures in the 200s with pain could be signs of very bad things happening inside you.


    I'm sure some of our expert SCI Nurses will chime in with advice on the antibiotics, but it is generally advisable to finish a course that is prescribed to you, rather than stopping when your symptoms resolve... This is to avoid becoming colonized with resistant bacteria (personally) and lessen the chances of resistant bacteria emerging (from a population standpoint). Just because your symptoms are gone does not mean you've killed all the bacteria.

  5. #5
    Okay thanks for the reply. I'll contact my doctor today and see what he has to say.
    "Life's a Party and Your Not Invited"

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by funklab View Post
    Patient information: High blood pressure emergencies (The Basics)
    Written by the doctors and editors at UpToDate

    What is a high blood pressure emergency? ? A high blood pressure emergency is a serious ? and even life-threatening ? condition that can happen when a person's blood pressure gets much higher than normal. When a person's blood pressure gets very high, it can lead to problems in one or more of the following organs:
    ●Eyes ? Problems can include bleeding in the back of the eye, or swelling of the nerve that runs from the eye to the brain.
    ●Brain ? Problems can include swelling or bleeding in the brain, or a stroke. A stroke is when part of the brain is injured because it goes without blood for too long.
    ●Kidneys ? Very high blood pressure can lead to kidney failure, which is when the kidneys stop working.
    ●Heart ? Heart problems can include a heart attack, heart failure, or damage to a major blood vessel.
    When your doctor or nurse tells you your blood pressure, he or she says 2 numbers. For example, your doctor might say that your blood pressure is "140 over 90." When people have a high blood pressure emergency, their blood pressure is usually "180 over 120" or higher.
    Other terms doctors might use for a high blood pressure emergency are "hypertensive emergency" or "malignant hypertension."
    Sometimes, a person's blood pressure is much higher than normal, but it hasn't damaged any organs. Doctors call this "hypertensive urgency." Hypertensive urgency is not usually treated the same as a high blood pressure emergency.

    What are the symptoms of a high blood pressure emergency?
    ? The symptoms depend on the organ or organs affected. They can include:
    ●Blurry vision or other vision changes
    ●Headache
    ●Nausea or vomiting
    ●Confusion
    ●Passing out or seizures ? Seizures are waves of abnormal electrical activity in the brain that can make people move or behave strangely.
    ●Weakness or numbness on one side of the body, or in one arm or leg
    ●Difficulty talking
    ●Trouble breathing
    ●Chest pain
    ●Pain in the upper back or between the shoulders
    ●Urine that is brown or bloody
    ●Pain when urinating
    ●Pain in the lower back or on the side of the body

    Should I see a doctor or nurse?
    ? Yes. Call your doctor or nurse right away if you have any of the symptoms listed above, especially if you know that you have high blood pressure.

    Will I need tests?
    ? Yes. Your doctor or nurse will ask about your symptoms, do an exam, and check your blood pressure. He or she might use a special light to look in the back of your eyes.
    Your doctor will also do tests to check how serious your condition is. Tests can include:
    ●Blood tests
    ●Urine tests
    ●A chest X-ray
    ●A CT scan or other imaging test of your brain ? Imaging tests create pictures of the inside of the body.
    ●A CT scan or other imaging test of your chest
    ●An ECG (also called an "electrocardiogram" or "EKG") ? This test measures the electrical activity in your heart (figure 1).

    How is a high blood pressure emergency treated?
    ? A high blood pressure emergency is treated in the hospital. Your doctor will give you medicines to lower your blood pressure quickly. These medicines usually go into your vein through a tube called an "IV."
    Your doctor will also treat any problems caused by your very high blood pressure, if they can be treated.
    People who have a high blood pressure emergency usually need long-term treatment to keep their blood pressure under control. This usually includes:
    ●Taking medicines
    ●Following a low-salt diet that includes a lot of fruits and vegetables
    ●Losing weight (if you are overweight)
    ●Getting regular exercise


    The above is patient information retrieved from uptodate.com on 6/2/2015.
    This is appropriate for malignant hypertension. This is different than autonomic dysreflexia, and must be treated differently.

    (KLD)

  7. #7
    ok, Many thanks for the reply. Going to run an IV (home health is) with some antibiotics and see if that takes care of it. But yes may have to be hospitalized.. It sounds like it may be pyelonephritis
    Last edited by MagikLair; 06-02-2015 at 03:04 PM.
    "Life's a Party and Your Not Invited"

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