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Thread: Stem Cell Treatment Speeds Up Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury in Monkeys

  1. #1

    Stem Cell Treatment Speeds Up Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury in Monkeys

    MODERATOR please move this article if this isn't the appropriate forum for this type of article.


    PR Newswire

    DURHAM N.C. May. 27 2015

    DURHAM N.C. May. 27 2015 /PRNewswire-iReach/ ? A new study appearing today in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine designed to test how stem cell injections affect primates with spinal cord injury (SCI) showed the treatments significantly improved the animals? motor function recovery and promoted faster healing too. The researchers call their findings a step forward toward the goal of improving outcomes for humans with chronic SCI.

    Photo ? http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20150526/218475LOGO

    Previous research conducted by various groups had indicated stem cell treatments helped rats with SCI. ?But because there are distinct differences in the nervous system and immunological responses between rodents and primates it is critical to determine how effective and safe the injections might be in a non-human primate SCI model as part of the translational research required for clinical trials? explained Hideyuki Okano M.D. Ph.D. of Keio University School of Medicine?s physiology department and a co-author of the new study.

    In this study the researchers grafted neural stem/progenitor cells (NS/PCs) derived from marmoset (a type of monkey) embryonic stem cells into adult marmosets suffering from a moderately bruised spinal cord. ?The advantage of using common marmosets is the similarity between their nervous system and immunological responses and those of humans? Dr. Okano said.

    The injections were given 14 days after the SCI occurred which research shows is an optimal time window for SCI therapy as inflammation has generally subsided by then and scar tissue has not yet had time to form.(Doctors believe that an incomplete spinal cord injury such as those of the study animals offers better chance for recovery than a complete SCI injury.) The results were promising.

    ?Eventually motor function recovery significantly improved in the transplantation group compared to a control group that did not receive stem cells? reported co-author Masaya Nakamura M.D. Ph.D. of Keio?s Department of Orthopedic Surgery. ?An animal in the control group for example could not raise her hands up to head height at 12 weeks after injury when motor function almost plateaus. On the other hand at the same point in time a transplanted animal was able to jump successfully and run so fast it was difficult for us to catch her. She could also grip a pen at 3 cm. above head-height.?

    In addition he added there were no signs of immune rejection or tumors which have been a side effect of some stem cell therapies.

    The researchers say this study is a step forward in their goal is to improve patients with complete SCI at the chronic phase. ?But we believe it will require a combination of stem cell transplantation rehabilitation and pharmacological therapy with the stem cells a key part of the treatment? Dr. Okano added.

    ?This translational research using a nonhuman primate model is a critical step in eventually applying these cells to injured spinal cord in human patients? said Anthony Atala M.D. Editor-in-Chief of STEM CELLS Translational Medicine and director of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine.

    The full article ?Allogeneic neural stem/progenitor cells derived from embryonic stem cells promote functional recovery after transplantation into injured spinal cord of non-human primates? can be accessed at http://www.stemcellstm.com.

    About STEM CELLS Translational Medicine: STEM CELLS Translational Medicine (SCTM) published by AlphaMed Press is a monthly peer-reviewed publication dedicated to significantly advancing the clinical utilization of stem cell molecular and cellular biology. By bridging stem cell research and clinical trials SCTM will help move applications of these critical investigations closer to accepted best practices.

    About AlphaMed Press: Established in 1983 AlphaMed Press with offices in Durham NC San Francisco CA and Belfast Northern Ireland publishes two other internationally renowned peer-reviewed journals: STEM CELLS? (www.StemCells.com) celebrating its 33th year is the world?s first journal devoted to this fast paced field of research.The Oncologist? (www.TheOncologist.com) also a monthly peer-reviewed publication entering its 20th year is devoted to community and hospital-based oncologists and physicians entrusted with cancer patient care. All three journals are premier periodicals with globally recognized editorial boards dedicated to advancing knowledge and education in their focused disciplines.

    http://investorstemcell.com/stem-cel...ry-in-monkeys/
    "I'm manic as hell-
    But I'm goin' strong-
    Left my meds on the sink again-
    My head will be racing by lunchtime"

    <----Scott Weiland---->

  2. #2
    Great to see science proving that the best and most powerful cells are hesc, better than adult sc.

    http://stemcellstm.alphamedpress.org...stract?papetoc

    Allogeneic Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells Derived From Embryonic Stem Cells Promote Functional Recovery After Transplantation Into Injured Spinal Cord of Nonhuman Primates
    Hiroki Iwaia,b, Hiroko Shimadab, Soraya Nishimuraa,b, Yoshiomi Kobayashia, Go Itakuraa,b, Keiko Horia,b, Keigo Hikishimab,c, Hayao Ebised, Naoko Negishie, Shinsuke Shibatab, Sonoko Habue, Yoshiaki Toyamaa, Masaya Nakamuraa and Hideyuki Okanob
    + Author Affiliations

    Departments of aOrthopaedic Surgery and bPhysiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; cCentral Institute for Experimental Animals, Kawasaki, Japan; dGenomic Science Laboratories, Dainippon Sumitomo Pharma Co., Ltd., Osaka, Japan; eDepartment of Immunology, Juntendo University, Tokyo, Japan
    Correspondence: Hideyuki Okano, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan. Telephone: 81-3-5363-3747; E-Mail: hidokano@a2.keio.jp; or Masaya Nakamura, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan. Telephone: 81-3-5363-3812; E-Mail: masa@a8.keio.jp
    Received September 26, 2014.
    Accepted March 25, 2015.
    Published online before print May 27, 2015.
    Abstract
    Previous studies have demonstrated that neural stem/progenitor cells (NS/PCs) promote functional recovery in rodent animal models of spinal cord injury (SCI). Because distinct differences exist in the neuroanatomy and immunological responses between rodents and primates, it is critical to determine the effectiveness and safety of allografted embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived NS/PCs (ESC-NS/PCs) in a nonhuman primate SCI model. In the present study, common marmoset ESC-NS/PCs were grafted into the lesion epicenter 14 days after contusive SCI in adult marmosets (transplantation group). In the control group, phosphate-buffered saline was injected instead of cells. In the presence of a low-dose of tacrolimus, several grafted cells survived without tumorigenicity and differentiated into neurons, astrocytes, or oligodendrocytes. Significant differences were found in the transverse areas of luxol fast blue-positive myelin sheaths, neurofilament-positive axons, corticospinal tract fibers, and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1-positive vessels at the lesion epicenter between the transplantation and control groups. Immunoelectron microscopic examination demonstrated that the grafted ESC-NS/PC-derived oligodendrocytes contributed to the remyelination of demyelinated axons. In addition, some grafted neurons formed synaptic connections with host cells, and some transplanted neurons were myelinated by host cells. Eventually, motor functional recovery significantly improved in the transplantation group compared with the control group. In addition, a mixed lymphocyte reaction assay indicated that ESC-NS/PCs modulated the allogeneic immune rejection. Taken together, our results indicate that allogeneic transplantation of ESC-NS/PCs from a nonhuman primate promoted functional recovery after SCI without tumorigenicity.
    "I'm manic as hell-
    But I'm goin' strong-
    Left my meds on the sink again-
    My head will be racing by lunchtime"

    <----Scott Weiland---->

  3. #3
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    Hideyuki Okano is a famous SCI researcher.
    http://www.okano-lab.com/en/

  4. #4
    Senior Member Tbone57's Avatar
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    This is good, no?

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by ineedmyelin View Post
    Doctors believe that an incomplete spinal cord injury such as those of the study animals offers better chance for recovery than a complete SCI injury. The results were promising.
    This seems to be the conventional wisdom. I wish some of these trials would include motor incompletes now that safety appears to not be an issue.

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