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  1. #1
    Senior Member lynnifer's Avatar
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    Converting Blood Cells to Neural Ones????

    http://www.ctvnews.ca/health/canadia...lood-1.2384075

    Published Thursday, May 21, 2015 12:04PM EDT

    Canadian scientists say they have figured out a way to turn regular human blood cells into nerve cells, an achievement that could lead to new advances for those suffering chronic pain or nerve diseases.

    Stem cell researchers from McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont. say they have learned how to convert cells from blood into both central nervous system neural cells -- which are the neurons in the brain and spinal cord -- as well as cells from the peripheral nervous system, which are the nerves in the rest of the body that are responsible for sensing pain, heat and itches.

    The research was led by Mick Bhatia, director of McMaster's Stem Cell and Cancer Research Institute, who says, at first, his team couldn't believe that their method had worked ...
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  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by lynnifer View Post
    http://www.ctvnews.ca/health/canadia...lood-1.2384075

    Published Thursday, May 21, 2015 12:04PM EDT

    Canadian scientists say they have figured out a way to turn regular human blood cells into nerve cells, an achievement that could lead to new advances for those suffering chronic pain or nerve diseases.

    Stem cell researchers from McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont. say they have learned how to convert cells from blood into both central nervous system neural cells -- which are the neurons in the brain and spinal cord -- as well as cells from the peripheral nervous system, which are the nerves in the rest of the body that are responsible for sensing pain, heat and itches.

    The research was led by Mick Bhatia, director of McMaster's Stem Cell and Cancer Research Institute, who says, at first, his team couldn't believe that their method had worked ...
    IMO if all this si true that could be a big step forward toward our cure in particular for the ones of us that will need cell replacement and also it might be very useful as a research tool.

    Paolo
    In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

  3. #3
    How are these cells different from other neural cells? What success rate have they shown in animal models ?

    Quote Originally Posted by paolocipolla View Post
    IMO if all this si true that could be a big step forward toward our cure in particular for the ones of us that will need cell replacement and also it might be very useful as a research tool.

    Paolo

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    Another article on this topic:

    As it stands, there's not a whole lot we know about pain. Where a tissue or blood sample can be drawn and studied, our nervous system comprising different kinds of cells running signals through complex piping around the body presents a difficult task for scientific research. But a new study details a technique that turns blood cells into different nerve cells, promising to improve our understanding of why things itch or burn. By extension, it is hoped that it could lead to new forms of pain relief that do away with unwanted side effects such as sleepiness or loss of concentration.

    Back in 2010, stem cell researcher at Canada's McMaster University Mick Bhatia caught our attention with a novel approach to creating blood stem cells from human skin stem cells. The technique streamlined this process, advancing efforts to create blood for surgery and treat leukaemia and other cancers.
    His latest work continues in this same vein, but demonstrates a method of converting somebody's blood sample into a variety of their nerve cells. This includes both the central nervous system of the brain and spinal chord, along with the peripheral nervous system in the rest of the body. The thinking is that this will allow unprecedented access to study a patient's specific neural system and address questions like why different stimuli trigger different sensations in different people.
    "Now we can take easy to obtain blood samples and make the main cell types of neurological systems - the central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system - in a dish that is specialized for each patient," says Bhatia. "Nobody has ever done this with adult blood. Ever."
    The patented technology could lead to new kinds of drugs that rather than create the perception of pain relief in the central nervous system, actually target the neurons in the peripheral nervous system. The hope is that this could lessen the side effects of pain relief drugs.
    "You don’t want to feel sleepy or unaware, you just want your pain to go away," says Bhatia. "But, up until now, no one’s had the ability and required technology to actually test different drugs to find something that targets the peripheral nervous system and not the central nervous system in a patient specific, or personalized manner."

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by c473s View Post
    How are these cells different from other neural cells? What success rate have they shown in animal models ?
    Have they even been tested in animals for any purpose yet? From what I gathered they haven't done any animal work, just proof-of-concept work in a dish.

  6. #6
    All they have done is as you point out proof thgey can produce cells. Now comes the years of rsearch to see how they might be used.

    Quote Originally Posted by tomsonite View Post
    Have they even been tested in animals for any purpose yet? From what I gathered they haven't done any animal work, just proof-of-concept work in a dish.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by c473s View Post
    How are these cells different from other neural cells? What success rate have they shown in animal models ?
    They are autologous and adult stem cells. I see that (if all this is true as I said) as an interesting discovery from a basic scienze point of view, not something to bring to trials tomorrow. Maybe they will find a way to make the process happen invivo and from there help people with cauda equina injury who need neuronal replacement (just speculating here).
    Then as I said I see it as a possibly interesting research tool to be used to understand better how to cure SCI and others CNS diseases.

    Paolo
    In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

  8. #8
    Senior Member lynnifer's Avatar
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    Another promising investment that Hansen et al are not financially supporting ...

    http://sccri.mcmaster.ca/bhatia_mick.html
    Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

    T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

  9. #9
    Senior Member lynnifer's Avatar
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    I'd like to contact this lab and see if I can view it. I did this in London a few years back .. Hamilton is only an hour further.
    Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

    T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by lynnifer View Post
    I'd like to contact this lab and see if I can view it. I did this in London a few years back .. Hamilton is only an hour further.
    It would be great if you could.

    Paolo
    In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

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