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Thread: 2GX is groaning axle

  1. #1
    Senior Member elarson's Avatar
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    2GX is groaning axle

    This probably sounds like a stupid question.... We have a TiLite 2GX folding chair and it is making a groaning sound that I think is coming from one of the axles. I used Teflon silicone lubricant spray on the axles, but it has not helped. It also seems a bit difficult to turn. The chair is about 4 years old, but it get's very limited use (30 minutes per day). Does anyone have any idea's on what I should check?
    Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

  2. #2
    Are the wheels spoke or mag? Mag wheels are low-maintenance and I can't speak much for them. But spoked wheels have lots of issues I tried to put this in simple-to-complex difficulties first.

    Tires and tubes in good condition, full of air?

    Camber tube alignment even on both ends? Check from the back of the chair. This can make it very difficult to roll.

    Toe-in / Toe-out not at issue, or very small? The farm boys around here (who help teach me to fix my chair) say that a *tiny* bit of toe in, like a quarter inch or half inch, helps with tracking. They told me to bring it back to them if I found it too bad to roll. I haven't had to take it back.

    Spoked wheels can feel difficult to turn if they are out of true. It can also cause vibrations (throughout the whole chair!!) I'm running wheels with a hop (aka slightly out of true) the last few days and I know this. Felt like I was getting a full body vibration massage, LOL.

    Side guards either not on or, if they are on, squeezing the cushion as tightly as possible? If I don't cinch my sideguards down with one of my super-torque Allen wrenches, I can tilt them out so they are rubbing against my wheels which makes for difficult rolling. To fix this (on a Quickie, maybe it's the same for Tilite), flip the chair on the backcanes or the front frame, get an Allen wrench or other fitting wrench in the sideguard mount, undo about two times to get it loose. Then tilt the sideguard (and mount) until the guard squeezes your cushion nicely. Then cinch down the mount as tightly as possible; I like super tight LOL.

    If you have a small enough finger (don't get stuck - that would be terrible!!) - also check for a camber tube burr. It may be that your axles still fit, but the setup doesn't spin as it should. Did you load that receiver with silicone spray too?

    I'm assuming you also checked the Tilite User Manuals for any ideas? I'm in the USA and can see both a Series 1 and Series 2 manual, each available in English, Espanol, and "DE" (Dutch?). Let us know if you need us to attach one here.

    Good luck!
    Mystery

  3. #3
    Senior Member elarson's Avatar
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    Thanks Mystery,

    It's not the every day chair, but one used only upstairs because we have stairlift. It has Spinergy LX's with Kenda tires with solid inserts. It's really a load groan, and I don't think coming from the wheels. There are no sideguards. We have not changed the toe-in/out. It's really sounds like it's coming from the axle, but I have not had time to check for burr inside the receiver -- will do that.

    It seemed to have started after I cleaned the old oil off the axles and inside the receivers (someone else had used oil). I then used silicon lubricant because I've been told that it is better for not picking up dirt, dust, etc., in the bearings. Could that have anything to do with this?

    I'm a native English speaker so okay with documentation, but did not see anything about this. Just as a note, DE = German, NL = Dutch.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mystery View Post
    Are the wheels spoke or mag? Mag wheels are low-maintenance and I can't speak much for them. But spoked wheels have lots of issues I tried to put this in simple-to-complex difficulties first.

    Tires and tubes in good condition, full of air?

    Camber tube alignment even on both ends? Check from the back of the chair. This can make it very difficult to roll.

    Toe-in / Toe-out not at issue, or very small? The farm boys around here (who help teach me to fix my chair) say that a *tiny* bit of toe in, like a quarter inch or half inch, helps with tracking. They told me to bring it back to them if I found it too bad to roll. I haven't had to take it back.

    Spoked wheels can feel difficult to turn if they are out of true. It can also cause vibrations (throughout the whole chair!!) I'm running wheels with a hop (aka slightly out of true) the last few days and I know this. Felt like I was getting a full body vibration massage, LOL.

    Side guards either not on or, if they are on, squeezing the cushion as tightly as possible? If I don't cinch my sideguards down with one of my super-torque Allen wrenches, I can tilt them out so they are rubbing against my wheels which makes for difficult rolling. To fix this (on a Quickie, maybe it's the same for Tilite), flip the chair on the backcanes or the front frame, get an Allen wrench or other fitting wrench in the sideguard mount, undo about two times to get it loose. Then tilt the sideguard (and mount) until the guard squeezes your cushion nicely. Then cinch down the mount as tightly as possible; I like super tight LOL.

    If you have a small enough finger (don't get stuck - that would be terrible!!) - also check for a camber tube burr. It may be that your axles still fit, but the setup doesn't spin as it should. Did you load that receiver with silicone spray too?

    I'm assuming you also checked the Tilite User Manuals for any ideas? I'm in the USA and can see both a Series 1 and Series 2 manual, each available in English, Espanol, and "DE" (Dutch?). Let us know if you need us to attach one here.

    Good luck!
    Mystery
    Last edited by elarson; 05-10-2015 at 07:58 PM.
    Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

  4. #4
    I'd check the rear axle bearings. Pull wheels off, stick finger in hole and twist. Check all four 24 inch bearings.
    Last edited by nonoise; 05-10-2015 at 05:15 PM.
    I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

  5. #5
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    How tight is the quick release pin set? Is there any "wobble there with just your hand? Something either seems "loose" or these things just flat out wear.

  6. #6
    Senior Member elarson's Avatar
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    Oh my, I was really afraid that someone might say this. I've not done a rear wheel bearing replacement and really don't want to, especially on a chair that is used so little (never outside, never wet, etc)

    Quote Originally Posted by nonoise View Post
    I'd check the rear axle bearings. Pull wheels off, stick finger in hole and twist. Check all four 24 inch bearings.
    Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

  7. #7
    Replacing the rear wheel bearings has been easy for me. I have a Quickie and can sometimes cheat and go to the auto / hardware shop - ask for alternator bearings; sometimes chainsaw bearings (at least in the USA). But, you'll need to be careful - I've had them not match by about a mm or two, which is maddening because then I have to go back to the shop! (Consider taking the wheels with you, not just the dropped out bearing.)

    I push the bearings out with whatever's handy in a punching motion (mallets and dowels tend to be most efficient), then put the new bearings in by using my fingers and, if necessary, whatever tool I used previously to push them in (be gentle with the new ones). My wheels generally have a spacer in them too, so I will try to line all those up before I put in the axle. You can search and find more procedure details here.

    Keep us posted!

    And thanks for the language abbreviation lesson - much appreciated!

    Take care,
    Mystery

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by elarson View Post
    Oh my, I was really afraid that someone might say this. I've not done a rear wheel bearing replacement and really don't want to, especially on a chair that is used so little (never outside, never wet, etc)
    Swap wheels with the other chair to find out for sure. Fit does not have to be perfect.
    I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

  9. #9
    It's easy to check the bearings, just a little harder to change them. You might as well check them because at least then you'll know if they are the problem and will be able to figure out how to fix them.

    Just take the axle pin out and use your finger to turn the bearings each side (i.e. 2 in each wheel). They should turn smoothly and silently, no gritty feelings or noises.

  10. #10
    I'd do like Nonoise says first. That way you know which wheel if any. If you only use the chair upstairs, you might just grease the pin and let it be your bearing. You can also pop the seals off the bearings with the point of a sharp knife. Push some grease (vasiine would work for the limited way you are using the chair) in the bearing and push the seal back on.
    When I got my 2GX it made a squeek. It was a rubber washer in the back rest, up at the top of the canes. The DME had attached the upholstery to it, so every time I moved it squeaked. I took it out and attached the upholstery to the cane properly.

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