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Thread: Scientists have regenerated nerves after spinal cord injury

  1. #11

  2. #12
    At the present time the study would be in a novelty lab result category. Much more research and work must be done to find and clear up the mechanisms. They're not working with a drug that is ready to go for humans and FDA approved, so it's not a matter of starting out with extrapolation studies right off the bat. The scientists are getting some results from a research reagent in basic studies only. In fact, you've glossed off my second post entirely which would be much more important to work with than rushing into extrapolations. This clearly was only a beginning bench study.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by JamesMcM View Post
    Well said. This drug does nothing for motor neurons? Motor and sensory neurons are separate things I am assuming, that is strange one is being activated while the other isn't. read that again on fire from a scientist
    Motor and sensory are indeed entirely different. This study shows the ARTN is binding GFRa3 and RET. Many more studies will need to be done to see if this was only limited trophic support or if there is indeed going to be promise of longer term activity that could be utilized in a therapy. Even then, they'll be cross examining information and watching for signs of cancer and tumors is the test animals due to previously known study results.

  4. #14
    I know, very early stuff! Still it's going on my frosted flakes. Noninvasive surgical treatments such as drugs are always encouraging to hear about.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by JamesMcM View Post
    I know, very early stuff! Still it's going on my frosted flakes. Noninvasive surgical treatments such as drugs are always encouraging to hear about.
    Well, maybe potentially a drug could be made... This may be a lot like the discovery in the John Flannigan lab where they found LAR would bind to CSPG and ultimately the students (Brad and Jared) in the Silver lab were able to make ISP (a peptide) that binds to the CSPG via utilizing a wedge. There's lots of steps and time along the way to make these discoveries turn into something significant and many don't turn out at all. At least Tufts is working on it. A nice find for such a young program.
    Last edited by GRAMMY; 05-10-2015 at 04:31 PM.

  6. #16
    The young programs hold excitement in that they are not looking in the old boxes.

    Quote Originally Posted by GRAMMY View Post
    Well, maybe potentially a drug could be made... This may be a lot like the discovery in the John Flannigan lab where they found LAR would bind to CSPG and ultimately the students (Brad and Jared) in the Silver lab were able to make ISP (a peptide) that binds to the CSPG via utilizing a wedge. There's lots of steps and time along the way to make these discoveries turn into something significant and many don't turn out at all. At least Tufts is working on it. A nice find for such a young program.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by c473s View Post
    The young programs hold excitement in that they are not looking in the old boxes.
    Precisely. They're not quarantined so hard into their labs NIH RO1 grant either. There's nothing more fascinating than talking to students that are allowed to experiment and test a few of their own theories. They just need to be allowed to do so with a few extra dollars in the budget and a great teacher backing them and stretching their imaginations and limits.

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