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Thread: Axon death?!

  1. #1

    Axon death?!

    After a complete spinal cord injury, do all motor and sensory axons die and shrivel away completely? Or do they sort of recede because they aren't getting stimulated or activated.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Tbone57's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JamesMcM View Post
    After a complete spinal cord injury, do all motor and sensory axons die and shrivel away completely? Or do they sort of recede because they aren't getting stimulated or activated.
    This might help

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bffNVMD6uII

  3. #3
    If you've ever watched one of the video presentations done by Dr. Jerry Silver, he explains that dystrophic axons are still alive after many decades but are entrapped in the CSPG.

    http://www.jneurosci.org/content/34/49/16369.abstract

    Last edited by GRAMMY; 05-06-2015 at 10:19 AM.

  4. #4
    Senior Member lynnifer's Avatar
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    I always thought they died and shriveled until Silver's work. It's encouraging.

    I have read about part of the brain being affected though ...
    Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

    T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

  5. #5
    It's crazy, there is just that slight chemical imbalance that wrecks everything for us, sometimes I just feel so strongly there has to be something to just change that imbalance and induce return upon us.
    "Life is about how you
    respond to not only the
    challenges you're dealt but
    the challenges you seek...If
    you have no goals, no
    mountains to climb, your
    soul dies".~Liz Fordred

  6. #6
    Well that's encouraging that the foundation is still alive. Is hisc peptide drug almost ready for human trial? I believe it's had good results in animals has it not?

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by JamesMcM View Post
    Well that's encouraging that the foundation is still alive.
    Yes, lining up runners for the Chicago marathon and just announced the first round of presentation speakers that will be at Working 2 Walk in Bethesda, Maryland on September 27th and 28th along with their lead sponsor Kennedy Krieger Institute. LINK

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by JamesMcM View Post
    Is his peptide drug almost ready for human trial? I believe it's had good results in animals has it not?
    This was the update that he gave out just a few months ago and was posted in December. I don't believe it's ready for humans yet as they're in the middle of some important experiments and gathering additional data.



    The Silver lab is dedicated to the functional repair of the chronically injured spinal cord. We have developed a number of animal models to mimic both complete inury (transection) as well as severe contusive injury (with a small amount of spared tissue), During my presentation I will update those at W2W on our chronic (2 months) contusive injury model and our efforts to build a bridge across the lesion. Our strategy here combines surgical scar removal + chondroitinase + fibroblast growth factor to maximize the capacity of peripheral nerve autografts to provide a regeneration bridge across the chronic lesion. We are excited to report that we are now describing for the first time a robust regeneration of certain (but not all) supraspinal axon tracts with some recovery of bladder function. We are now in the process of further maximizing this strategy by further combining a novel regenerative peptide. I will also discuss a pilot study of 6 months chronic contusive animals injected only with chondroitinase and the regenerative peptide (no bridge building). I am excited to report that half of the animals have nicely improved daily urinary output with also remarkably improved physiology of bladder and sphincter coordination. Some of these animals also recovered the ability to grid walk. I will discuss our further plans to carry on with these experiments. Finally, I will briefly mention our collaborative chronic work on the respiratory system after hemisection lesion at C2 (up to 1.5 years after injury) in collaboration with the Warren Alilain lab. We have documented remarkable return of breathing using chondroitinase + intermittent hypoxia. We also understand now why too much intermittent hypoxia can cause problems in some animals and by understanding the basic biology of how the serotonergic system is influenced by these treatments we have learned how to maximize the return of proper rather than chaotic function. Now that we are finally beginning to show promising functional recovery at chronic time points after SCI we should be optimistic that our successes in animal models can lead to translation in spinal cord injured people.

    Read On... Additional Information Posted At This LINK
    Last edited by GRAMMY; 05-07-2015 at 01:52 PM. Reason: spelling

  9. #9
    Senior Member mcferguson's Avatar
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    man, that sounds like real progress!
    T5/6, ASIA A, injured 30 Nov 08
    Future SCI Alumnus.
    I don't want to dance in the rain, I want to soar above the storm.

  10. #10
    Senior Member lynnifer's Avatar
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    Recovery of breathing would be huge. Let's hope it's successful and sped to human trial.
    Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

    T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

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