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Thread: Help with wheels?

  1. #11
    Your rear wheels are likely toed out. Think the opposite pigeon toed. I say so by your description of the chair wanting to wander to the path of least resistance too much. On this Quickie the toe in can be adjusted by adding or removing washers under the axle plate like you did to adjust the camber. BTW, zero camber should track straight, mine does.

    Get a couple of straight yardsticks or something else like that which is straight and align them parallel to the floor, one on each side of the chair against the wheels at axle height. You'll need someone to hold them for you in this position while you measure the distance between them at the zero and 36 inch ends. The distance should be the same. If not add or remove washers, keeping in mind camber. You might need to find some thinner washers to finish the job. I tossed away a Quickie gpv because it was too hard to push. Now I know what was wrong with it.
    I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Sarafino's Avatar
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    I tried it in the mall and in Walmart yesterday and it still pulls to the left, with my hands off the wheels, just coasting. I will do the alignment checks and get back to you guys. This forum is great, esp for people like me who have no local 'real life' wheelchair friends to ask about this stuff. The nearest chair users I know are 7 hours away. It totally appreciate the information shared here, this is wonderful. Thank you all SO MUCH!

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sarafino View Post
    ...the old solid mag wheels say 37-540 (24 X 1 3/8) and the larger spoke wheels say 28-622.
    Because no one has answered this yet...

    Your 28-622 tires are actually 700c in the bicycle world. The 28 means 28mm tire width and the 622 stands for a 622mm distance measured at the tire bead. In the bicycle universe tire sizes are often measured at the outside diameter of the tire (the tread-700c in this case). This measurement of course can vary depending on the tire profile, or height of tire from bead to tread. It's kind of dumb because this "c" measurement can be subjective and confusing. So, it is best to use the mm. measurement for deciding which tires fit on which rims.

    All that aside, those 28-622 tires, with their wheels, are huge for a wheelchair. They're bigger than 26" wheels. For someone who is very tall, they might be acceptable but for you, at 5' 8", it's ridiculous. The most used wheel size for chairs is 24" (22" for children and small adults, 26" for tall people). The 25" size has become popular lately, and they're a good choice for people who aren't too short for them. This size wheelchair rim will fit a 26" bicycle tire, making it a good choice for outside, in the grass or rough, riding.

    You must take care when changing wheel sizes on any chair set up for a different size. Not only does this affect rear seat height it also changes the chair's alignment, especially with respect to the front casters. Caster forks should be perpendicular to the ground (plumb). If they aren't, your chair will not handle well and may even be dangerous.
    Last edited by ala; 04-24-2015 at 11:17 PM. Reason: I wrote 662 instead of 622 in some places. corrected now.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by ala View Post
    . . . those 28-622 tires, with their wheels, are huge for a wheelchair. They're bigger than 26" wheels. For someone who is very tall, they might be acceptable but for you, at 5' 8", it's ridiculous. The most used wheel size for chairs is 24" (22" for children and small adults, 26" for tall people). The 25" size has become popular lately, and they're a good choice for people who aren't too short for them. This size wheelchair rim will fit a 26" bicycle tire, making it a good choice for outside, in the grass or rough, riding.

    You must take care when changing wheel sizes on any chair set up for a different size. Not only does this affect rear seat height it also changes the chair's alignment, especially with respect to the front casters. Caster forks should be perpendicular to the ground (plumb). If they aren't, your chair will not handle well and may even be dangerous.
    x2
    Chas
    TiLite TR3
    Dual-Axle TR3 with RioMobility DragonFly
    I am a person with mild/moderate hexaparesis (impaired movement in 4 limbs, head, & torso) caused by RRMS w/TM C7&T7 incomplete.

    "I know you think you understand what you thought I said, but what I don't think you realize is that what you heard is not what I meant."
    <
    UNKNOWN AUTHOR>

  5. #15
    Senior Member pfcs49's Avatar
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    Wow! That's identical to my first chair from 95 that I used until 2002! In fact, I used those plastic wheels until last year on my Ti Lite.
    That Quickie Revolution lay around until recently I disassembled it. Most of the parts I still have if you need anything. (axle, castors, etc)
    That is a fairly heavy chair, and along with it's size being too big, maybe not the best choice.
    My first guess about the tracking issue would be a seizing castor bearing. They are so easy to change that I carry one with me.
    I do miss the Revolution's ability to fold into such a small package-it was a great design. They should come out with something similar in titanium with better folding hardware//joints; it would be a winner.

  6. #16
    I just noticed your cable ties at the front of your chair. They are there for you to loop the calf strap through so that when you chuck it into the car etc the calf strap doesn't move up and try to become a seat depth extension.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Sarafino's Avatar
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    Here is a pic of me in the chair with my smaller wheels (they measure about 23 3/4" on the outside of the tread):

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    I think I found the problem with pulling to the left, the left wheel is toed out. No wonder it wants to go left I only had one yard stick, so I couldn't do it the way nonoise suggested, but I have a framing square and flipped it back onto the handles and checked it that way. I am sure it isn't as precise, but the difference was pretty big so I will adjust it with washers sometime today and see where that gets me. Here is another issue my husband was wondering about, is it normal for the caster forks to have this much play up and down in the housing?

    http://youtu.be/FhkxWPahizE

  8. #18
    Senior Member Sarafino's Avatar
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    Thank you Ala for your feedback regarding tire size, too. The guy that gave me all this still is pretty tall, and the wheels are brand new like he never even used them. Guess I should list them somewhere, maybe trade them. Definately for a much taller person that I.

  9. #19
    in a word, no. It's not normal to have that much play. Take the cap off the top of the castor housing and make sure the nut is done up properly, but not so much as to restrict the castors turning.

    Your castor mounts still don't look upright. Use your framing square to check them. The part where the castors attach to the frame of the chair has a straight edge at the front which should eb perpendicular to the floor. The bolts that hold it on are offset bolts so by loosening and rotating them you will adjust the castor mount position, set it so that they are perpendicular to the floor.

    Your wheels look like a good size for you. Your fingertips are roughly level with your axle pin which means that you are sitting at a good height in relation to the wheels for efficient pushing.

    Your seat depth is a little short, but the fact that you have the footplate flipped out will have semi compensated for that. If you were ordering your own custom chair then you'd want an extra inch or two in seat depth really.

  10. #20
    . . . and, if you're comfortable with the idea, move your axle a bit forward (no more than 1/2" at a time) to make your chair less front heavy (easier to wheel over thresholds and such). If you move it forward too far, tipping over backwards becomes likely (which is why some users have anti-tippers, including me).
    Chas
    TiLite TR3
    Dual-Axle TR3 with RioMobility DragonFly
    I am a person with mild/moderate hexaparesis (impaired movement in 4 limbs, head, & torso) caused by RRMS w/TM C7&T7 incomplete.

    "I know you think you understand what you thought I said, but what I don't think you realize is that what you heard is not what I meant."
    <
    UNKNOWN AUTHOR>

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