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Thread: Ti lite TR with rear suspension

  1. #1

    Ti lite TR with rear suspension

    Howdy folks. I currently have a tilite tr. My spasms and back pain have worsened over time. does anybody have a tilite with the rear suspension? I've had a colours shockblade that I really liked, and I'm wondering how the tilite compares to the shockblade. any photos/leads would be appreciated. thanks.

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike G. View Post
    Howdy folks. I currently have a tilite tr. My spasms and back pain have worsened over time. does anybody have a tilite with the rear suspension? I've had a colours shockblade that I really liked, and I'm wondering how the tilite compares to the shockblade. any photos/leads would be appreciated. thanks.
    Hey Mike!
    TiLite offers Frog Legs rear suspension (Google for images), they don't have a proprietary suspension system at this time and I have no information that one is under development (information which is not typically shared).
    Are you going to the LA Abilities Expo? I'm planning on going on Friday, March 6th.

  3. #3
    I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

  4. #4
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    Guys...can someone please tell me what is the purpose of having a solid frame like the TR, where practically all power on each push is transmitted through the frame and applied to the ground/surface versus having a TR with a suspension and X amount of that power is absorbed by the suspension instead of applied to the ground?

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by rlmtrhmiles View Post
    Guys...can someone please tell me what is the purpose of having a solid frame like the TR, where practically all power on each push is transmitted through the frame and applied to the ground/surface versus having a TR with a suspension and X amount of that power is absorbed by the suspension instead of applied to the ground?
    Like with so many wheelchair equipment options, there are tradeoffs to be made. As the OP mentioned, he's experiencing a worsening of spasticity and back pain. Suspension can help to take the edge off these symptoms. The amount of push energy loss is related, no doubt, to the quality of the shock and how it is integrated into the chair's design. Jeff Adams could address this topic with far greater authority than I can -- if he finds it.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Oddity's Avatar
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    A properly designed and setup wheelchair suspension (i.e. with preload and compression/rebound dampening adjustability) doesn't have to absorb any push energy, and can still be quite effective at doing its job. The Icon has such a suspension. Setup for a given rider's weight and push stroke it can seem perfectly rigid while pushing normally, until the rear wheels hit a bump.
    "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

    "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

    "Even what those with the greatest reputation for knowing it all claim to understand and defend are but opinions..." -Heraclitus, Fragments

  7. #7
    Senior Member NW-Will's Avatar
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    It is a shame you can't trial an Icon for a week.
    It takes a little more than a 5 minute roll around in a perfect environment to really get to grips with the pros of the suspension chair.

    If the pain in your spine is aggravated as you roll down the street, I would be willing to bet once you have got used to a good suspension chair you would never go back to a solid chair.

    As for the power loss, you adjust the suspension to the point where it suits you best.
    After a while of rolling the power-loss argument will be lost in the ether and you'll just enjoy the ride and wonder why every chair isn't built this way.

  8. #8
    thanks for the responses fellas. I'll echo Stephens response. There's trade offs to be made, and I already knew that. At this point in my life I'm leaning towards the comfort factor/pain management aspect of the chair. I'm lucky enough to have a van and a power chair for those days that I'm going on long hauls. The majority of the time, I'm in a manual chair. My back up chair is a shockblade with wijits attached to them. due to a shoulder issue I hadn't used the shockblade for a longest time. After using the tilite as my primary, I recently got back on the shockblade and I couldn't believe how much smoother and comfortable vs a straight rigid chair. NW-Will hit the nail right on the head. I took the suspension chair for granted. At the time I requested the ti lite I was really active and getting in and out of my car several times a day. I gets cumbersome breaking your chair apart and putting it back together again every time you get in and out. I therefore requested a tilite which I've had for several years. However, most of you know that things change. the past 6 months, I've been experiencing stronger spasms and pain in my lower back for no apparent reason, and I'm still going back and for forth with my doctors as to what the reasons could be. Anyways I digress. The reasons I won't make my shockblade my primary again is that it wasn't fitted/measured correctly, so I just use it as my wijit exercise chair. I'll be doing some more research and going to the abilities expo to see if I can find out more about the frog rear end suspension as I'm finding out that's what tilite is using on their chairs. If I don't feel confident with it, I'll ask my therapist to stay with the colours shockblade, and this time make sure it's fitted right, with the right bucket, dimensions etc. I'm not trying to make this a debate between different company's but rather what chair would be best for me. Thanks for all your input, feel free to respond/comment/make suggestions, this forum has a wealth of knowledge to offer and I'll gladly take it.

  9. #9
    Senior Member ~Lin's Avatar
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    I highly recommend trying out an Icon!
    Board Member of Assistance Dog Advocacy Project working in Education. Feel free to ask me any service dog questions!

    I am not paralyzed. I have a genetic connective tissue disorder with neuro complications and a movement disorder.

  10. #10
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    Like I said, I am no engineer, but any kind of moving parts do absorb energy. I assume if you have enough of the moving parts, the energy can be transferred though all of the parts, such that you do not notice it. I know nothing about an Icon. Blinking your eyes does absorb energy, but we do not notice it. And yes, I agree 100% there are trade-offs. Glad someone said something like that.

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