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Thread: Everything you know about home elevators?

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by pfcs49 View Post
    Mine was manufactured in Poughkeepsie, right down the road from Franklin Roosevelt's place in Hyde Park, where he had a virtually identical model!
    It was called an "invalid elevator".
    Personally, if I'm going to ride in an elevator, I'd rather have a valid one.

    That thing is so cool. I didn't realize it was human powered. I always figured there should be an easy way to operate an elevator with your arms. I'm perfectly capable of pulling myself up to the second floor with a few pulleys and a little mechanical advantage...
    Last edited by funklab; 02-03-2016 at 10:30 PM.

  2. #12
    Senior Member pfcs49's Avatar
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    You don't need much "pull". The machine is counterbalanced with an adjustable stack of iron weights; when set up properly, very little effort is required.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by pfcs49 View Post
    You don't need much "pull". The machine is counterbalanced with an adjustable stack of iron weights; when set up properly, very little effort is required.
    Is there a mechanical advantage to the pulley system? It seems like if it's perfectly balanced, you would still have to lift your weight. And what about going down? How does that work?
    I love seeing that elevator. It is a true museum piece. Congratulations on owning and installing it.
    I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

  4. #14
    Senior Member pfcs49's Avatar
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    You load the counterbalance stack so it's balanced to your weight (in my case, ~200lbs). With nothing in the cab, it has a 200lb impulse to fly through the ceiling!
    But a device as ingenious as it is simple, that the torque of the roped shaft passes through, locks the shaft whenever the main shaft tries to accelerate the pulley shaft, locking the machine whenever it tries to run backwards (i.e: transmit torque to the rope shaft in either direction of rotation, up or down.)

    There is about a 4/1 MA. About four feet of rope for each foot of elevation (pun very intentional)! This makes for plenty fast elevationing(?) when the machine is well balanced; 2 or 3 strong pulls accelerate that big rope-pulley and off you go, up or down. In fact, it it is CW'd so the cab runs heavy, it's actually slower going down because instead of coasting, the torque brake starts dragging as the heavy load tries to accelerate the rope pulley and drags the brake plates against the middle, stationary, plate.
    Last edited by pfcs49; 02-04-2016 at 10:57 PM.

  5. #15
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    Here's one that is similar. It's homemade, though. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UdHkTUdGHp4

  6. #16
    Senior Member Them Bones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brent K View Post
    Here's one that is similar. It's homemade, though. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UdHkTUdGHp4
    Something like this is exactly what I want. Human powered, silent, reliable, quick, and small footprint.

    Would this even be legal in the states? Particularly MA, NH, or ME. Would any contractor agree to work on something like that? Or if I built it myself, would it make my home uninsurable?

    I'm still strongly averse to a home elevator. I only see them as noisy, oversized, slow, and overpriced. Not to mention unreliable and susceptible to power outages.
    Although, I suppose if a house's accessibility depends on electricity a generator would be needed.

  7. #17
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    I've seen many that use hoist purchased from Harbor Freight along with make shift carriages. I'm guessing that trial and error is the only way of figuring the amount of counter weight. As far as insurance, I've never found a discussion about it.

    Personally, I would rather use something similar. Seems like a person would have far less problems as long as you kept it greased and oiled. I may be wrong but it doesn't appear that it would be very costly or difficult to build. I think he also has some form of magnetic lock that engages once the weights reach the pulley. That's sort of what it sounds like. If you watch his hand as he gets closer to the floor, it appears that he reaches for a switch along with the mechanical lock.
    Last edited by Brent K; 02-16-2016 at 11:58 PM.

  8. #18
    @pfcs49
    That is a nice elevator.

    @Brent K
    Thats exactly what I want, however, I'm a quad so pulling might be a little difficult.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by bhandel76 View Post
    @pfcs49
    That is a nice elevator.

    @Brent K
    Thats exactly what I want, however, I'm a quad so pulling might be a little difficult.
    I am too. If I could have one fabricated, I was thinking that a 12v winch might work to lift it. It sort of looks like you would only be lifting your's and your chair's weight. I don't think that it would require a very large winch and with a battery backup you wouldn't be stranded if your power was to go out. It really appears to be a simple design.

    I like the rims that you have designed and marketed. I will probably be ordering a set soon.
    Last edited by Brent K; 04-13-2016 at 11:04 PM.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Them Bones View Post
    Something like this is exactly what I want. Human powered, silent, reliable, quick, and small footprint.

    Would this even be legal in the states? Particularly MA, NH, or ME. Would any contractor agree to work on something like that? Or if I built it myself, would it make my home uninsurable?

    I'm still strongly averse to a home elevator. I only see them as noisy, oversized, slow, and overpriced. Not to mention unreliable and susceptible to power outages.
    Although, I suppose if a house's accessibility depends on electricity a generator would be needed.
    I just had an outdoor elevator install as I am on coat of fl elevation 19 feet its quiet an has batter back up 17100 I wanted a cargo lift abot 10000 but the county got wind of it I love it

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