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Thread: Schwalbe Marathon Plus Tire Pressure?

  1. #11
    http://www.amazon.com/Campbell-Hausf...air+compressor

    http://www.amazon.com/Slime-COMP-07-...0JFD1ABD40JYMJ

    http://www.sportaid.com/sportaid-cc2...ompressor.html

    Several buying options, but these will get you up to higher pressures. I have the Campbell Hausfeld rechargeable, nice to throw in the back of the truck for weekends, handcycle riding, etc. just in case. I run my Schwalbes at 115.

  2. #12
    Suspended Andy's Avatar
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    I use a tank-style compressor which gets to 150 or a bit over, with a on-board regulator/guage, and a gas station style chuck on the hose (no lever, just press on to fill). Combined with Schwalbe screwed-on style Schrader valves for stability, I can fill to 145psi and pop the chuck off with little or no air loss after filling. I think I got that compressor on sale at Homey Despot for under $100 with the accessories...great setup for nice low-rolling resistance tires

  3. #13
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    Chas, what size wheels and tires are you on? How did you put 2nd set of tires on? Manually or shop? If manual, use anything? Difficult or easy to change? I just purchased my 2nd set of tires. Waiting for them to show up. Not sure if I should play game of do change myself or just take to shop and pay the $. Shop can probably change tires faster than I can release/attach wheel. I am leaning toward change myself when they arrive.

    Quote Originally Posted by chasmengr View Post
    I'm on my 2nd set of MPEs; been running them at 140# for four years (I like hard tires), and top them off every week (at which time they're down to ~125) with a Serfas FMP-500 Floor Pump (I can stand), which pumps to 260 psi.




    Sheldon Brown's website on bicycles discusses tire pressures.



  4. #14
    In my youth, I was an avid bicyclist, and learned a lot. Now I change my own tires with a valve wrench, tire irons (edit: three bare-metal tire irons), and a floor pump with gauge. I run 559 MagicWheels.

    I even changed a flat on my AeroZ while away from home awhile back. I always carry tools, extra tubes, and a CO2 inflater.

    Pneumatic tires are easy to change with the right tools and know-how (edit: and sufficient hand function). The most common nube error is a pinched tube. If you've never changed a bike tire before, pay a bike shop to do it, and ask to watch and learn. Then the first time you try it yourself, have extra tubes. You're quite likely to pinch a few.

    One technique I always use includes removing valve stems from new tubes before mounting them. After mounting tire and tube fully on wheel, inflate each tube almost full; when you remove the hose, the tire deflates, and wrinkles (future leaks) are gone. Reinsert valve stems, and inflate to desired pressure. Always use quality rim tape over spoke heads. If you're running high pressure tires (like Schwalbe MPEs), use quality tubes, too.
    Last edited by chasmengr; 12-12-2014 at 12:04 PM.
    Chas
    TiLite TR3
    Dual-Axle TR3 with RioMobility DragonFly
    I am a person with mild/moderate hexaparesis (impaired movement in 4 limbs, head, & torso) caused by RRMS w/TM C7&T7 incomplete.

    "I know you think you understand what you thought I said, but what I don't think you realize is that what you heard is not what I meant."
    <
    UNKNOWN AUTHOR>

  5. #15
    I run 115, and find that with care, I don't lose much pressure when flipping off the chuck. If I screw up, I pump that tire up again. I'd probably notice a 30 pound difference.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by rlmtrhmiles View Post
    I have electric pump. Only goes to 125. I run close to that. Clip loses air when really high. I hold it with my hand. You will begin to see change in performance and the strength required by yourself to push chair the lower you run the pressure. Higher pressure will give you better performance but "bumpier" ride. Lower pressure will give smother ride but lower the pressure the greater the loss of performance. It is your decision.
    Perfect summary! I spoke to Spinergy (wheel people) customer service about pressure on MPEs, and they recommended 95-115PSI depending on compromise of smooth ride and efficient propulsion.

  7. #17
    I figure the closer they are to the max the faster the molecules are going to find their way to leak out, so I don't bother to get over 120 even with a power pump. It is time to add air when my brakes start to slip.
    I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

  8. #18
    Going at 140 - 145 for the last 5 years. Most of my day is on concrete and office floors so I really like them to be firm. I try to top them off every week. Pushing on them does not give me a good sense of what has been lost or if they have gone way below 145.

  9. #19
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    Really I love the high pressure. Those tires are fantastic then. Here is an example. The in grocery store, the very high pressure, I can give 1 push at beginning of aisle and sale all the way to the end. With the lower pressure, the same aisle requires multiple pushes to go the length of the aisle. Need remember though, grocery store surface is smooth and flat.

  10. #20
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    Tires are going to shop. Decided no fart around. I have the tools, but really never changed tires. Was surprised how still the MPEs are. Plus really no sidewall for and flex.

    Quote Originally Posted by chasmengr View Post
    In my youth, I was an avid bicyclist, and learned a lot. Now I change my own tires with a valve wrench, tire irons (edit: three bare-metal tire irons), and a floor pump with gauge. I run 559 MagicWheels.

    I even changed a flat on my AeroZ while away from home awhile back. I always carry tools, extra tubes, and a CO2 inflater.

    Pneumatic tires are easy to change with the right tools and know-how (edit: and sufficient hand function). The most common nube error is a pinched tube. If you've never changed a bike tire before, pay a bike shop to do it, and ask to watch and learn. Then the first time you try it yourself, have extra tubes. You're quite likely to pinch a few.

    One technique I always use includes removing valve stems from new tubes before mounting them. After mounting tire and tube fully on wheel, inflate each tube almost full; when you remove the hose, the tire deflates, and wrinkles (future leaks) are gone. Reinsert valve stems, and inflate to desired pressure. Always use quality rim tape over spoke heads. If you're running high pressure tires (like Schwalbe MPEs), use quality tubes, too.

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