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Thread: Great depression!!??

  1. #21
    You're absolutely right, it's all my own assumptions but they are based more educated and reputable people's opinions and writings. and A purely hypothetical question. I have my trainer level in high angle rescue, confined space rescue and swift water rescue as well as wilderness search and rescue. But without my physical ability I feel like those skills would be useless in such scenario. But who knows. A friend of mine is very knowledgeable with what's going on around the world, as well as up to date on conspiracy theories. And we have decided that the realistic and honorable thing for me to do The event of environmental or social collapse is to end my life, ironic I know when you you consider how I feel about my injury in a pampering society. My bladder is colonized with bacteria, catheters, commodes, leg bags and electric wheelchair etc Will not be realistic. I'm not taking medicine from the strong and efficient and I'm not going to eat food that I can't work for and contribute to getting more. I have a very functional katana waiting for such a catastrophe. I'll just die a slow and painful death well burdening the group anyways, mine as well go out the honorable way that I have always admired. But hopefully nothing like that happens I laugh because it's very evident that something will in my generation. We've lived very easy for a long time, and throughout history it shows that that never lasts.

  2. #22
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2031949/

    This was an excellent read. So basically nobody survived more than a few weeks after a spinal cord injury until the late 1940s, unless it was an extremely minor injury even still not expected to live long. They were basically just kept comfortable until they died. Earliest documented case was in Egypt just over 2000 years ago obviously just left to die. So it's obvious that several thousand years ago nobody survived paralysis and lived with the disability, that is just a ridiculous thought. Antibiotics, medical supplies and extensive caregiving is absolutely necessary for someone with severe paralysis to survive. And a relatively healthy able-bodied person could go for quite some time alone with very little resources. No comparison.

  3. #23
    Knowledge regarding the way people with disabilities were treated in prehistoric times dispels the notion that survival of the fittest was the rule of the day. There is evidence derived from the study of skeletal other remains from past civilizations. As historians such as Sigerist who I mentioned in an earlier post reported there are rudiments of “medical” treatment that go way back. He points to evidence such as a skeleton of a young adult consistent with spina bifida paras that dates back to the Neolithic era. Skeletons consistent with other disabling conditions including major amputations, severe arthritis, spinal tuberculosis, and dislocated hips have also been found. There is evidence of treatments such as boring holes in the skull and removing small pieces. There are skulls with well-healed bore holes indicating that at least some survived. Some of these date back to the Neanderthal period. They have also found skeletons consistent with hydrocephalus and hemiplegia in ancient Egyptian mummies. Other researchers have studied contemporary primitive societies and found that some went to great lengths to attempt to treat and care for their sick and disabled members. I find the evolution of medicine and the treatment of disability to be quite fascinating. You can pick up some conversation starters too. Did you know ttt use of catheters dates back to ancient times? There are accounts of people using hollow reeds and even onion stalks to get relief. I know…ouch! But if you gotta go, you got to go. lol
    You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
    http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

    See my personal webpage @
    http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by SCIfor55yrs. View Post
    Knowledge regarding the way people with disabilities were treated in prehistoric times dispels the notion that survival of the fittest was the rule of the day. There is evidence derived from the study of skeletal other remains from past civilizations. As historians such as Sigerist who I mentioned in an earlier post reported there are rudiments of “medical” treatment that go way back. He points to evidence such as a skeleton of a young adult consistent with spina bifida paras that dates back to the Neolithic era. Skeletons consistent with other disabling conditions including major amputations, severe arthritis, spinal tuberculosis, and dislocated hips have also been found. There is evidence of treatments such as boring holes in the skull and removing small pieces. There are skulls with well-healed bore holes indicating that at least some survived. Some of these date back to the Neanderthal period. They have also found skeletons consistent with hydrocephalus and hemiplegia in ancient Egyptian mummies. Other researchers have studied contemporary primitive societies and found that some went to great lengths to attempt to treat and care for their sick and disabled members. I find the evolution of medicine and the treatment of disability to be quite fascinating. You can pick up some conversation starters too. Did you know ttt use of catheters dates back to ancient times? There are accounts of people using hollow reeds and even onion stalks to get relief. I know…ouch! But if you gotta go, you got to go. lol

    Because there is some evidence of primitive society caring for people with disabilities, well fascinating does not dispel the saying survival of the fittest. They were only surviving because of other caring for them. And most of these injuries and evidence you stated where wounds or trauma, they survived these things yes with help, but because they were strong and fit, able. I'm telling you for a fact almost nobody survived a spinal cord injury even 100 years ago. Let alone ancient times. Herbal or "natural" antibiotics only go so far, they're not going to deal with a serious kidney, blood infection. pneumonia would mean almost certain death, and they weren't performing spinal surgery with sharp rocks and mud lol. Even when surgery was becoming more prominent anesthetics where essential for procedures like this spinal surgery is relatively new just like a heart transplant. Without those three things (antibiotics, surgery, anesthetics) among other things with a relatively serious spinal injury you are doomed.

    But yes you are correct their were ancient societies that took care of their injured and disabled well most societies took care of their injured, so just disabled. Like I said some even looked at this disabled as good luck, and a sign of wisdom. But other cultures like Sparta people born with disabilities were thrown off a cliff other civilizations including more "modern" societies avoided them because they thought they were possessed with evil and/or contagious. Other times they were avoided, just left to die just simply because they couldn't provide for themselves and weren't lucky enough to have people around mostly the dark ages they were doomed if they were peasants. Even with a few examples this doesn't change my perspective, I still stand by and believe it is a fact it is survival of the fittest, just because I survived because people care for me does not change that, if anything it reinforces it's true.
    Last edited by JamesMcM; 10-21-2014 at 01:28 PM.

  5. #25
    The quote from your post that I responded to: "Please name that society, culture etc I would like to research that nonsense. And I don't believe for one second several thousand years ago people with disabilities survived, when 70 years ago barely anybody was living with paralysis don't be ridiculous."

    Now that I have done that you blow it off because they survived with the care of others. We would not survive as a species if caring for one another was not a powerful instinct. Babies must be cared for for a long time. You have every right to stay in the box that you have created for yourself. I only respond so that you and other readers of this thread are better informed. I hope the box in which you have placed yourself provides some solace for you.
    You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
    http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

    See my personal webpage @
    http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

  6. #26
    You are The one in the box man! Barley anybody lived after a spinal cord injury 80 to 90 years ago, with or without the care of others. you haven't done anything to prove that otherwise. You mentioned wounds, injuries, arthritis and spinal bifta that was the closest thing, I'm talking about actual spinal cord injuries what we are dealing with ourselves. It's like If I were to Make the hypothetical event that the entire disabled community went to war with an equal sized army of able-bodied people with all the wonderful spectrums and limitations of reality you would say "ah i'm not going to answer your dumb hypothetical question based off your assumptions, but the disables would have a pretty good chance. Haha it's like you can't accept or realize the full implications of our limitations what it means to be "disabled", like you always want to say yeah but we can do this, or this. Just because someone is paralyzed does not mean all of a sudden they're of higher intelligence, it also does not mean that able-bodied people are automatically less intelligent or incompetent. It's like because of their ignorance toward the disabled we think they are stupid, well let's face facts the knowledge of the disabled community, how we go about our lives, eat, shit, piss isn't exactly fulfilling, practical useful knowledge. How how many of us would go back to the supposedly "ignorant" able-bodied life given the choice? What i was saying is when I was able bodied I could go out on my own I could farm, hunt, gather everything I needed I wouldn't have to worry about infections or how I'm going to manage my bladder and bowel's, and I have survival skills, no need for a person in a wheelchair to be pointlessly directing me how to do things. If the tables were turned and one of my friends or family were disabled, absolutely I would take care of them, I would put them on my back and carry them, their life would be 100% dependent on me and/or the group. Of course the thoughts of leaving them behind or being merciful would cross my mind if resources were becoming scarce when we cant feed the healthy, the workers. And that's where I come to the conclusion if something like that does happen I will not burden my friends or family with my dependence, I will not take food from the healthy that I can't work for. And Iam prepared for that. I feel that taking care of the disabled is a luxury only achievable by a pampering, well functioning society, same now as it was in the past. The harness of Reality brings me no solace, quite the opposite.

  7. #27
    The fantasy you created has a noble ending in which you sacrifice yourself for the greater good. You become a hero. The story gives you back the sense of power and control that the SCI has taken away from you. It is a struggle many, if not most of us go through. Many of us would similarly sacrifice ourselves for the greater good, especially if it was part of the quest for a SCI cure. However, we differ from you in that unless and until such an opportunity comes along we live in the real world with its many unknowns. You are treating your doomsday story as a certainty. Now it is my time to ask a hypothetical: What if your ending does not happen?
    You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
    http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

    See my personal webpage @
    http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

  8. #28
    James, who said you need to be a burden?

    It is very possible to live independently as a C5/6.

  9. #29
    James,
    i see a paradox in your thinking. Many scientists are very far from physical perfection you seem to glorify, and would not do very well in the "survival of the fittest" scenario. And yet, they are the people from which you seek help.
    You are young and you are smart. You yourself could study neuroscience and move the field forward.
    I hope the progress in sci repair will come fast, but i dont think it will come in the form of the miracle cure that will make people just as they they were before their accidents. So no matter what, you will have the re-invent yourself to some degree.

  10. #30
    Senior Member tooley's Avatar
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    hey again James. I hope you don't see all us busy-bodies as attacking you. Or maybe you like that, I can't tell. I've said it before - everyone here is rooting for you. Each of us goes about it in our own way. Everybody loves an underdog.

    This past year I got to visit London Ontario to play wheelchair rugby (for our listeners knowledge, you know cuz I reached out to you before I went). I got to play against an amazing young lady - http://www.torontorehabfoundation.co...n-Cameron.aspx - what an incredible person. In May she could barely push a manual chair. Now she just got back from Japan playing with Team Canada against the best in the world. She didn't do it by having a shitty attitude. I know you won't play but you may want to read her story. She was, and still is, a natural athlete who was dealt a raw deal but nothing will ever stop her from being successful in life.

    There's only so many ways we can say it. Someone said it to me when I was still in the hospital - "Boy, your ears must be getting warm because you have your head up your ass." Stop trying to convince yourself that life sucks.

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