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Thread: Trial Work Period, anybody done it recently?

  1. #11
    Yes, the Medicare part is correct. If you buy private insurance through your new job, that company may send you a coordination of benefits form every year to determine who pays first if you need medical care.

    If you have a job lined up but haven't started, the TTW program can still be valuable. Check with your state's Voc. Rehab agency and consider meeting with a case mgr. to determine if they have anything to offer: not by finding you a job, but providing assistance to help you keep that job. Discuss any concerns you may have about transportation and equipment. They get paid when you meet certain milestones. I was wary of private employment agencies that accepted TTW. Dealing with state agencies is a slow process and very dependent on the case manager you get.

  2. #12
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    Be careful to track this yourself and any money you feel may be an over-payment you should put aside and not spend. They will come back for it and it may be a year or so until they get around to it.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by funklab View Post
    Thanks for the reply. I looked into the Ticket to Work program a while back, but I don't think it will really be applicable in my situation. I will (hopefully) have a gig that pretty much requires a 4 year contract with full time hours and benefits.

    While reading up on ticket to work again, I came across something pretty interesting, however.

    "Continuation of Medicare?If your
    Social Security
    disability benefits
    stop because of your
    earnings, but you are still
    disabled, your free Medicare Part A
    coverage will continue for at least
    93 months after the nine-month trial
    work period. After that, you can buy
    Medicare Part A coverage by paying
    a monthly premium. If you have
    Medicare Part B coverage, you must
    continue to pay the premium. If you
    want to end your Part B coverage, you
    must request it in writing."

    93 months is a really long time. That's what, almost eight years! I hadn't seen that before.
    If you were working with VR in the past, your Ticket very well might have been assigned to them. VR typically dismisses your case after 90 days of employment. It may be beneficial for you to assign your Ticket to an Employment Network after that. The Ticket To Work program is a voluntary program that allows you to access services from either the state Vocational Rehabilitation agency or an Employment Network (EN) of your choice to help you reach your employment goal. When you work with VR or assign your Ticket to an EN, develop a plan, and continue to make timely progress toward employment, SSA will not conduct a continuing medical review. I know of many ENs that have employees who specifically help people with questions like you're having about what will happen to your benefits both short and long-term. They can help you past employment as it sounds like you already know and are achieving your goals.

    2drwhofans is correct in his/her posts. If you have any other questions, feel free to PM me and I'll help explain it more and provide you with resources!
    Aerodynamically, the bumble bee shouldn't be able to fly, but the bumble bee doesn't know that, so it goes on flying anyways--Mary Kay Ash

  4. #14
    When you get to the point of filing an income tax return, give some time and thought to "work related medical expenses". Many years ago I used to list all those expenses under "Other expenses" on Itemized Deductions page, instead of "Medical" expenses - which only allows a small percentage deduction! The "Other" expenses are a full deduction. I found this out by carefully reading up on it in a tax manual.
    Such a tax return will probably result in a refund, and believe me, you are going to need all angles to preserve your earnings due to unexpected needs and things like equipment, devices, etc., etc.
    Keep a good record of any out of pocket disability related expenses that are not covered by other sources.

  5. #15
    I completed the 9 month TWP, 1.5 years ago and yes, got 2 or 3 months more of SSDI payments , called a bunch of times to be sure they STOPPED benefits which they did after the 12 months. Make sure you contact Medicare and pay the monthly premiums. Yes - you can stay on Medicare for 8 years. Ironically, I went to work for SSDI as a medical consultant -so I have been on both sides of the coin. The ability to stay on Medicare, if necessary, is a great benefit.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by november View Post
    If you were working with VR in the past, your Ticket very well might have been assigned to them. VR typically dismisses your case after 90 days of employment. It may be beneficial for you to assign your Ticket to an Employment Network after that. The Ticket To Work program is a voluntary program that allows you to access services from either the state Vocational Rehabilitation agency or an Employment Network (EN) of your choice to help you reach your employment goal. When you work with VR or assign your Ticket to an EN, develop a plan, and continue to make timely progress toward employment, SSA will not conduct a continuing medical review. I know of many ENs that have employees who specifically help people with questions like you're having about what will happen to your benefits both short and long-term. They can help you past employment as it sounds like you already know and are achieving your goals.

    2drwhofans is correct in his/her posts. If you have any other questions, feel free to PM me and I'll help explain it more and provide you with resources!

    Wait, so my ticket is "assigned" to someone??? and they can "dismiss my case"

    Now I'm all confused again. Why would a ticket to work not follow the person and instead follow whatever particular agency is involved... wait... forget that last part, asking for logical reasons is probably not a productive exercise.

    So how would I get my ticket reassigned... and who would I get it reassigned to once I start working.

  7. #17
    I am confused. From my understanding is that you can still get medicare for at least 93 months after the 9 month TWP. What happens after the 93 months? Can I still pay the premium to keep the medicare?

    Continuation of Medicare?If your
    Social Security
    disability benefits
    stop because of your
    earnings, but you are still
    disabled, your free Medicare Part A
    coverage will continue for at least
    93 months after the nine-month trial
    work period. After that, you can buy
    Medicare Part A coverage by paying
    a monthly premium.
    If you have
    Medicare Part B coverage, you must
    continue to pay the premium. If you
    want to end your Part B coverage, you
    must request it in writing."
    T3 Complete
    to my alarm: "quiet b*tch! I know what I have to do every two hr. Argggggg!!!!"


  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by 2drwhofans View Post
    During the Trial Work Period, you get 9 months in a 60 month time frame in which you can earn as much as you are able and still get your full monthly SSD payment. The 9 months don't have to be consecutive but you've got to notify SSD about any month you aren't working so the clock doesn't keep running.

    Once you finish your TWP and are earning over Substantial Gainful Activity ($ 1,070 a month in 2014), you enter into a 36 month Extended Period of Eligibility. When your EPE starts, you should get your SSD check for that month ( the TWP cessation month ) and the two months after ( the grace period ). That's where the 12 month part you read about comes into play.

    Once you're in the Extended Period of Eligibility but outside of the grace period, you can still get your SSD payments during months when you either can't work due to disability or when your gross wages are less than the SGA amount.

    Once the 36 month EPE is over you have a 5 year period of Expedited Reinstatement during which they can re-start your SSD benefits without a new application. The form for applying to start the Expedited Reinstatement process was hard to find. Here it is: https://secure.ssa.gov/apps10/poms/i...-SSA-371-1.pdf

    You may want to also look up the SSD Ticket To Work program and determine if any additional assistance is available.

    The official SSD guide to work incentives is the Red Book: http://www.socialsecurity.gov/redbook/

    Best of luck to you. Going back to work was a big mile stone for us. In our situation, knowing about SSD's work incentive programs helped with the decision making process.

    So, after the 9 months twp, how many years do you get before the expedited reinstatement period expire? 5 years or 36 months+5 years?
    T3 Complete
    to my alarm: "quiet b*tch! I know what I have to do every two hr. Argggggg!!!!"


  9. #19
    "Continuation of Medicare Coverage
    SSDI eligible
    What is Continuation of Medicare Coverage?
    Most persons with disabilities who work will continue to receive at least 93 consecutive months of Hospital Insurance (Part A); Supplemental Medical Insurance (Part B), if enrolled; and Prescription Drug coverage (Part D), if enrolled, after the 9-month Trial Work Period (TWP) You do not pay a premium for Part A Although cash benefits may cease due"

    If I have Medicare part A, B and D right now. If I decided to go back to work, do I still have Medicare part A, B and D for 93 months after the 9 months twp? It says that I do not pay a premium for Part A. Does that mean that I will have to pay for Part B and D?
    T3 Complete
    to my alarm: "quiet b*tch! I know what I have to do every two hr. Argggggg!!!!"


  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by tinng321 View Post
    I am confused. From my understanding is that you can still get medicare for at least 93 months after the 9 month TWP. What happens after the 93 months? Can I still pay the premium to keep the medicare?

    Continuation of Medicare?If your
    Social Security
    disability benefits
    stop because of your
    earnings, but you are still
    disabled, your free Medicare Part A
    coverage will continue for at least
    93 months after the nine-month trial
    work period. After that, you can buy
    Medicare Part A coverage by paying
    a monthly premium.
    If you have
    Medicare Part B coverage, you must
    continue to pay the premium. If you
    want to end your Part B coverage, you
    must request it in writing."

    Yes. Once all the time is used up, Social Security will send you a letter notifying you that you are eligible to buy into Medicare A.

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