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Thread: Why so much hype about Cord Blood stem cells and not Neural stem cells???

  1. #1

    Why so much hype about Cord Blood stem cells and not Neural stem cells???

    Hi Everyone,
    Does anyone know why Wise young and everyone seems to be so focus on Cord Blood stem cells when Neural stem cells have the most potential? Also I was reading that Cord blood stem cells are mostly not pluripotent and that in fact may all of the cells in it have been identified as not pluripotent??????

    -> If anyone has any answer to this or clarification I would be so greatful for ANY response!!!!

    THANK YOU Everyone!!

  2. #2
    Cord Blood Stem cells are much more plentiful than any other kind of stem cells. They do not carry the moral implications that other types of stem cells may as they come from the umbilical cords of babies who have already been born. They are also very easy to match to patients, thus greatly reducing the risk of rejections by the immune system.

    I also don't know what you mean by "Wise Young and everyone" being focused on cord blood and nothing else...there are way more teams working on neural stem cells or other types of stem cells than cord blood. In fact, Wise is the only researcher I know of focusing on cord blood...I'm sure there are others, but Wise is the only one I've heard of, where as other types of stem cells I've read about multiple teams doing work, especially neural tem cells.

  3. #3
    Dear Tomsonite,
    Thank you for your answer, so nice of you to respond to my question!!! I guess the reason I asked is because recently I have been learning much more about stem cells and it occured to me that *for the brain* the best cells would be neural cells which they usually would reprogram from embryonic cells... I believe... I am very new to stem cells but it just seems like cord blood cells are not the most ideal cells for *the brain* because they are already quite mature and according to what I have read so far they are not pluripotent. Thank you for clarifying about Wise Young being one of the few focusing on the Cord blood cells, thats what I was not certain about, why he would be focusing on them.
    Thank you also for clarifying about why people might focus on cord blood, I agree with the fact that they are more plentiful and have less moral implications. Although Im not sure if they are very easy to match to patients because of the immune system... form what i know there has to be at least a 50% match... i believe..... which seems to make it hard unless you or a sibling or parent had there cord blood stored at birth and you use that it seems difficult to find a match???

    THANK YOU, THANK YOU THANK YOU FOR YOUR ANSWER/RESPONSE, I ALWAYS REALLY APPRECIATE PEOPLE WHO RESPOND TO MY QUESTIONS!!

    Nice of you, thanks !

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by tomsonite View Post
    Cord Blood Stem cells are much more plentiful than any other kind of stem cells.
    I don't think a majority of neuro researcher agree on that. Where have you heard this?
    Debating on CareCure is like participating in the special-olympics. You may win, but you're still disabled.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by void View Post
    I don't think a majority of neuro researcher agree on that. Where have you heard this?
    From Wise. When he said they are more "plentiful" than other cells, I believe he meant that there are more UMBCs already banked around the world and ready to be implanted than any other kind of stem cell. Additionally, they are very easy to obtain, as all you need to do is harvest the blood from the umbilical cord of a baby that was born, which happens probably thousands of times every day.

  6. #6
    At present, there are four sources of neural stem cells that I know of.

    The first is from your own brain. In adults, neural stem cells are located in the subventricular zone, hippocampus, and olfactory bulb. I am not sure that many people are willing for a surgeon to dig out a chunk of tissue from those parts of the brain. The hippocampus is of course the part of the brain responsible for your ability to lay down new memories, your olfactory bulbs for your sense of smell, and subventricular zone is real deep in your brain. Even if you get a chunk of the these tissues, the number of stem cells is relatively small (like several hundred thousand) and one has to expand these cells in culture. Extensive safety studies need to be done to ensure that the cells will not turn out to be tumor-like, i.e. make the wrong number and kind of cells when transplanted into the brain or spinal cord.

    The second source is aborted fetuses. These are obviously not immune-matched to users and likely to be rejected unless you receive prolonged or perhaps even lifelong immune-suppression. It is possible that these cells will survive long enough in the spinal cord to have some beneficial effects, including stimulating regeneration. Neural Stem and Stem Cell Inc, both of whom have permission to run clinical trials on fetal neural stem cell lines in people with chronic spinal cord injury in the United States.

    The third source are genetically induced neurons. Several groups have genetically re-programmed skin cells to produce neurons. These have not yet been transplanted into people yet and there are safety concerns, including whether or not these cells will produce tumors when transplanted. Incidentally, many groups have shown that induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) can produce neurons but the same concern of possible tumors are associated with iPS-derived neurons.

    The fourth source is a tumor-derived neural stem cells. One such cell line has been used extensively in animal studies and appear to produce many neurons. Note that this cell line was derived from a neuroblastoma (a neural tumor). Nevertheless, several people with strokes have received transplants of this neural stem cell line, without much return of function.

    There are other sources of neural stem cells but they tend to be less reliable. For example, some groups have claimed to have isolated neural stem cells from bone marrow, fat tissue, and even intestinal glia. However, much work needs to be done to find the best form and approach of isolating these cells for transplantation.

    In contrast, umbilical cord blood is the richest source of stem cells of any adult tissue, including bone marrow. The average 100 ml unit of umbilical cord blood contains about 200 million mononuclear cells, of which about 5% are stem cells that can produce a variety of cells, including neurons. Over 25 years of experience of transplanting umbilical cord blood into people to treat bone marrow diseases and cancer have shown that transplanted umbilical cord blood cells are safe, do not produce tumors, and engraft even with 4:6 HLA matched cells. About 500,000 public units of umbilical cord blood are stored around the world, allowing most people to get at least a 4:6 HLA-matched umbilical cord blood unit. There are millions of privately stored cord blood units owned by families. The above was the basis of my statement at Kessler yesterday that umbilical cord blood is the richest source of stem cells available today.
    Last edited by Wise Young; 10-03-2014 at 09:17 AM.

  7. #7
    Dear Wise,
    Thank you so much for gracing my thread, What a pleasure to wake up and see your post.

    Thank you for clarifying about the neural stem cells lines. I was not aware that ips cells that have been reprogrammed to produce neurons, have not been transplanted into humans yet.
    I was also not aware that cord blood cells have 5% of stem cells that have been identified as being "pluripotent"...Would it be possible to see a publication about these pluripotent cells in the cord blood? From the literature I was reading it sounded like the majority of cord blood is composed of "hematopoietic, mesenchymal, and possibly some endothelialstem cells ".

    I also was reading yesterday about a study done in the U.K. where Neural stem cells derived from reprogrammed embryonic cells (i believe) were transplanted into some stroke patients brains and so far results have been mildly successful so they are going to start a phase 2 clinical trail based on outcome. ReNeuron is the company that is doing the study and I have not been able to find there published clinical trial so if anyone has it please let me know!!!
    http://www.reneuron.com/ren001-for-stroke

    THANK YOU AGAIN FOR RESPONDING TO MY POST!!

  8. #8
    Dear Wise,
    I was also curious about your work at Rutgers. Besides your lab do you ever teach any classes these days?
    Thanks again,
    Sog

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Sog View Post
    Dear Wise,
    I was also curious about your work at Rutgers. Besides your lab do you ever teach any classes these days?
    Thanks again,
    Sog
    I teach three courses every year at Rutgers. Every Fall, I teach Advanced Topics in Neuroscience to majors of Cell Biology & Neuroscience, usually about 6 lectures. In the Spring semester, I give 6 lectures and a exam in an Advanced Neurobiology course for 100 students. I also teach a freshman seminar course for about 20 students. In addition, I give 20-30 talks every year around the world (China, Japan, India, Taiwan, Europe, USA), teaching doctors how to do clinical trials and scientists how to do spinal cord injury research. These include four 3-day workshops a year to 10-20 investigators/workshop on how to do the standard rat spinal cord contusion model, how to take care of the spinal-injured animals, and how to measure the outcomes of the injury and therapies. Over the past 16 years, I have taught over 1500 investigators how to do spinal cord injury in these workshops. At each 3-day workshop, I give a total of 9 one-hour lecture and participate in hands on demonstrations.

    I do quite a bit of small group teaching. Every Thursday, I meet with my two graduate students and a medical student about their dissertations. Every Friday morning, I meet for two hours with students, postdoctoral fellows, technicians, and colleagues working on research projects in my laboratory. Every Friday afternoon, I meet for 30 minutes with four undergraduate students that I am mentoring and then 2 hours with a dozen or so undergraduate students who are working in or interested in working in my laboratory. At any given time, about 6 undergraduate students, three graduate students, and 1-2 postdoctoral fellows are doing research projects in my laboratory.

    Finally, I give monthly Open Houses to 10-20 families with spinal cord injury on the First Friday of every month. These usually go from about 6 to 9 pm, with many families coming early or staying late in order to talk about their situation. This includes a big summer Open House that occurs every year with 300 or more people. Since 1997, probably over 6000 families with spinal cord injury have come to visit the Center.

    Wise.

  10. #10
    Asterias is not currently in the stroke field to my knowledge but you might find their site interesting. I believe they mat be very close to having FDA approval for their trials which are based on the Geron study in modified form. http://asteriasbiotherapeutics.com/o...al-focus/opc1/
    Quote Originally Posted by Sog View Post
    Dear Wise,
    Thank you so much for gracing my thread, What a pleasure to wake up and see your post.

    Thank you for clarifying about the neural stem cells lines. I was not aware that ips cells that have been reprogrammed to produce neurons, have not been transplanted into humans yet.
    I was also not aware that cord blood cells have 5% of stem cells that have been identified as being "pluripotent"...Would it be possible to see a publication about these pluripotent cells in the cord blood? From the literature I was reading it sounded like the majority of cord blood is composed of "hematopoietic, mesenchymal, and possibly some endothelialstem cells ".

    I also was reading yesterday about a study done in the U.K. where Neural stem cells derived from reprogrammed embryonic cells (i believe) were transplanted into some stroke patients brains and so far results have been mildly successful so they are going to start a phase 2 clinical trail based on outcome. ReNeuron is the company that is doing the study and I have not been able to find there published clinical trial so if anyone has it please let me know!!!
    http://www.reneuron.com/ren001-for-stroke

    THANK YOU AGAIN FOR RESPONDING TO MY POST!!

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