Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 44

Thread: Adaptive Equipment that Doesn't Exist for Spinal Cord Injury

  1. #11
    Pretty much anyone with a C7 injury can operate an electric can opener of various designs. I know there has been some discussion about wine bottle openers...how about that? Grooming does include make-up application for women (see UDS FIM guidelines that clearly state it includes this).

    You are not going to find a lot of "patients" here...but you will find a lot of people who have C7 (and other) spinal cord injuries. In my experience, people with a C7 injury often are taught the use of a lot of adaptive equipment for these things when in rehab, and even issued equipment (which exists in vast quantities), but a year post injury most have discarded the equipment and figured out compensatory techniques for these activities that don't require special equipment any more.

    Have you discussed with your instructor??

    (KLD)

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Stacia View Post
    It's a school assignment, i am an OT student.
    Cool. As KLD mentioned, a lot of us don't rely on adaptive equipment long-term. OT is partially about problem-solving. Personally, for meal prep, one of the most precarious things I deal with is dumping liquid contents out of a sauce pan or frying pan after cooking (think dumping pasta into a colander, etc). Figure out something to make that easier for people with limited grip and/or no grip (or tenodesis).

    I'd steer your focus toward the universal design side of things... read up on OXO, for example: http://www.oxo.com/UniversalDesign.aspx

    (I have a C6/7 injury & my wife is an OT)

  3. #13
    What's really lacking IMO is a decent stowable tray. Something that could fold out from the armrest like an airline seat tray, or spread like a Japanese fan would help greatly with feeding and food prep. Placing things in the lap can be dangerous. My wife got second degree burns on her legs just trying to move a cup of coffee. She's always spilling in her lap (drowned the cell phone once). But she doesn't want a cup holder because she thinks it will be in the way of the joystick or limit pulling up to a table or the bathroom sink. Swing away mounts limit ability to go through doorways. She doesn't want to have to move the joystick and a cup holder all the time.
    If I had the time, and access to a CNC router, I'd build a Japanese fan style tray.

  4. #14
    Stacia,
    KLD is correct that a C-7 quad has little need for many of the grooming and food prep adaptive devices. I have a C-5/6 injury and wish I could have the extra dexterity a C-7 has.

    Are you a Pinterest user? If so, you will find 100s, if not more, OT Pinterest pages that have pictures and links to every adaptive device you can think of.

    I have been collecting pins that you may be interested in that apply to grooming, dining, cooking and other categories that accommodate a disability. This link should take you there -http://www.pinterest.com/adaptEVOLVE/dexterity-cooking/ - you'll find devices that make it easier to pour and a cutting board that will hold slices of bread in place to make for easy spreading.

    On this page, http://www.pinterest.com/adaptEVOLVE/your-body/, there are pins that depict the nerve damage associated with the levels of injury. Lots of spinal cord injury graphic representations that will help you in the learning process.

    You will be led to many OT Pin Pages I have pinned from where you can learn even more.

    Good luck and have fun pinning.
    Last edited by Broken Doll; 09-20-2014 at 01:00 AM. Reason: error

  5. #15
    Senior Member Kulea's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Kailua, Hawaii
    Posts
    413
    I vote for an ice cream scoop that scoops by itself, or at least makes scooping hard ice cream really easy.
    C-6/7 incomplete

  6. #16
    Senior Member Kulea's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Kailua, Hawaii
    Posts
    413
    If you want something really hard, I really could use a freezer organizing system. One that helps you fill up the freezer, but still makes it easy to get things in and out. Stuff seems to get piled on top of one another and it is difficult to get to the stuff underneath. And frozen foods are HARD and slippery, so pulling one thing out tend to make a lot of thing fall out. And once they are hard like that, trying to put them back in without them sliding back out is a PITA. My freezer door is often open for MANY minutes for something that just should have been a few seconds.
    C-6/7 incomplete

  7. #17
    Senior Member Kulea's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Kailua, Hawaii
    Posts
    413
    Here's another idea. A really easy to hold and use rubber spatula. When I am baking, it is a PITA to scrape the batter out of the mixing bowl. So, here's the thing. Think of anything you do that REALLY takes two hands. In this case, holding the bowl and holding the spatula. We tend to use both hands to do only one of those things, because we don't have the grip for each hand to hold each thing independently. So we figure out ways to maybe have something also hold one of the things, while we use both hands for the other. But, scraping a bowl is an example of when that doesn't work too well, because both items need to be in motion. If you think through all the cooking tasks, you will probably come up with other examples of when two hands are both being used in a coordinated way (hey that ice cream scoop is nearly the same thing, only because ice cream can get hard). When you think of something, then ask on here and we'll respond with whether we've solved that already, or not.
    C-6/7 incomplete

  8. #18
    Senior Member Kulea's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Kailua, Hawaii
    Posts
    413
    Oh, I know, shelling shellfish. Crabs, or shucking oysters, etc. Shelling lobsters, yum.
    C-6/7 incomplete

  9. #19
    Senior Member Kulea's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Kailua, Hawaii
    Posts
    413
    A really good dough kneader. Does one already exist? I'm not talking about the dough hooks. I mean real bread kneading. I mean a real strong c-7 might be able to, but since we really can't apply body weight AND use both hands, it's hard to be an effective kneader.
    C-6/7 incomplete

  10. #20
    Great ideas Kulea - I would especially welcome the freezer organizing system and the ice cream scoop.
    Chas
    TiLite TR3
    Dual-Axle TR3 with RioMobility DragonFly
    I am a person with mild/moderate hexaparesis (impaired movement in 4 limbs, head, & torso) caused by RRMS w/TM C7&T7 incomplete.

    "I know you think you understand what you thought I said, but what I don't think you realize is that what you heard is not what I meant."
    <
    UNKNOWN AUTHOR>

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 11-28-2009, 05:53 PM
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-24-2006, 07:39 PM
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-25-2002, 06:41 PM
  4. Spinal Cord Injury Doesn't End Waukesha Man's Dreams
    By Max in forum Funding, Legislation, & Advocacy
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-20-2002, 11:44 AM
  5. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-27-2002, 11:48 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •