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Thread: Thought's on linebreeding and stem cells

  1. #1
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    Thought's on linebreeding and stem cells

    Ok so I'm not sure if any of ya'll are familiar with line breeding or not but I do it with my cattle along with our hunting hounds. Essentially what it is, is close breeding within the same line, strain, or family of the dog. In doing this we are trying to keep certain traits within my hounds i.e. nose, brain, drive or hunt etc.. In doing this you will double the good traits along with the bad. In other words if you breed a young bitch to her father or grandfather and they both carry the same bad habits it will double there faults. Sorry for babbling, What I am getting at is from the thread below about the woman growing the tumor after getting cell treatments. Say if you were a woman with a family history of breast cancer. You receive cord blood cells from Dr. Young's trial and the cord blood you receive is from a person who has the same family history of breast cancer. Will it double your chances of getting breast cancer? Does this make any sense to anyone? Dr. Young could you comment on this when you get a chance?

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    Much like keeping the cord blood from your son, daughter or nephew, niece. Then turning around and using it. Maybe even using your own body's stem cells could fall under the same category. Any doctor or scientist thoughts on this?

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    Senior Member khmorgan's Avatar
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    If you get UCB stem cells injected into your spinal cord, you do not change your genetic makeup. For example, if you get blood in a hospital, you do not suddenly have the same genetic predisposition of the donor. Remember the old "All In The Family" episode when Archie thought he had received blood from an African American? He thought his skin would turn black

    Breeding within a family is a lot different that one family member or anyone else giving another stem cells.

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    Haha sorry I'm 28 a little before my time. But I understand what you are saying. Just didn't know about injecting the cells. I understand that they wont change your genetic make up. Though what I don't understand is if you inject a person with more cells that could possably be cancerous how could that not up your chances? Maybe It doesn't just a thought I had.

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    Senior Member khmorgan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by #LHB# View Post
    ... Just didn't know about injecting the cells. I understand that they wont change your genetic make up. Though what I don't understand is if you inject a person with more cells that could possably be cancerous how could that not up your chances?...
    Certainly! If the cells are cancerous, have HIV, etc. You could suffer ill effects. That is always a concern. But, one must trust that the doctors preparing the cells know what they are doing.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by khmorgan View Post
    If you get UCB stem cells injected into your spinal cord, you do not change your genetic makeup. For example, if you get blood in a hospital, you do not suddenly have the same genetic predisposition of the donor. Remember the old "All In The Family" episode when Archie thought he had received blood from an African American? He thought his skin would turn black

    Breeding within a family is a lot different that one family member or anyone else giving another stem cells.
    If you get a umbilical cord blood or bone marrow transplant that engrafts in your bone marrow, it will start producing cells that have the genetic makeup of the transplanted cells. After several weeks, in most cases where your own bone marrow has been destroyed, all the blood cells that you have will have the genetic makeup of the transplanted cells. Over a lifetime, many of the cells in your body become replaced by cells produced by the bone marrow. Since the bone marrow is a source of mesenchymal stem cells, eventually many tissues in your body (including fat, ligaments, and other connective tissues) will actually take on the genetic makeup of the cells that have engrafted.

    In theory, it is possible that the engrafted cells may even replace sperm. However, this has not yet been reported. In any case, if you take the blood of a person who has had a bone marrow transplant, their ABO type and HLA-type will change. You have become a "chimera" and that is an organism with cells from two individuals. On the other hand, if cells are transplanted into the spinal cord, they should not be making any blood cells. While the transplanted cells may replace local cells in the spinal cord, they are not likely to replace blood cells. So, the likelihood of transplanted cells making you a chimera in the rest of your body is low.

    The Archie example is actually not as far-fetched as people might think. Peripheral blood contains stem cells. So, when your receive blood transfusions from somebody, most of the cells that you receive will die (a natural death) but some stem cells may survive. These stem cells may create what is called micro-chimerism, i.e. they go into certain organs and produce little islands of cells. This is in fact, what happens in pregnant women. Early in pregnancy, some fetal cells cross the fetal-placenta barrier and gets into the mother's blood. The cells can become lodged in many tissues of the body and produce islands of cells that come from the fetus.

    Several studies of microchimerism in pregnant women have shown that a majority will carry some cells from their babies in their bodies for the rest of their lives. For example, normally, a woman would never have any cells with the Y-chromosome in them. However, after she has had a male baby, the mother may have islands of Y-chromosome containing cells in various tissues all over her body.

    Wise.

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