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Thread: Tilite Locks:

  1. #1

    Smile Tilite Locks:

    Tilite Lock:


    Composite
    1) Push OR Pull to lock
    2) Scissor


    3) Black Aluminum Scissor

    4) Uni-Lock



    may I know which of the Tilite wheel locks given less breakdown or problem.

    cheers....

  2. #2
    Senior Member elarson's Avatar
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    Nobody seems to be responding, so I will give it my best shot. It's always best if you can give some input on what your limitations might be. Note from my signature that I am a care partner, and my partner is not SCI.

    We have had aluminum push-to-lock with extenders, TiLite/Out-front composite push-to-lock and D's Locks.

    Of them, we like the TiLite/Out-front composite push-to-lock and D's Locks the most.

    The TiLite/Out-front composite push-to-lock are really light weight, but effective. I was surprised how strong they are for being so light weight. Also, for us, that is an area on the chair that gets a lot of water with transfers to the shower, and they have maintained well with that. If you are looking for something that works and that you don't have to maintain much, these are a good option.

    Our favourite is D's Locks, but that is also because my partner can lock them both from one lever on the side he can access. They are very solid, and regardless of the tire pressure, always work, and are very low maintenance. They rock a little bit with Spinergy PBO spokes, but we have not found that to be a problem.

    I hear very little about the Uni-Locks, and am not really sure what their advantages would be. Many think they are one-sided locks where you can lock them both with one lever, like the D's Locks, but they are not. You can probably do a search on the forum about them to learn more.

    We have demo'd the composite scissors, and they were very nice also, but did not fit my partners situation. My partner would not be able to manage the scissor type, because they would be difficult to access on one side and also lower and out of his visual field.
    Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

  3. #3
    Senior Member lazierdog's Avatar
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    I have the composite scissor push to lock on my TiLite. They're ok but I prefer a scissor pull to lock. I had under the seat scissor pull to lock on my old E&J and Quickie chairs. Why you ask? Well, they're a much cleaner look. Also, when I'm out of my chair and I have to lock the brakes for whatever reason, pushing the lock pushes the chair away from you so it's much harder to lock them with one hand because the chair wants to roll away from you. When they're pull to lock, you're pulling the chair towards you so it's infinitely easier to lock them. I have regular push locks on another chair and I despise them. They get in the way more than I would like. As for maintenance, I never really had any trouble with brakes.
    Last edited by lazierdog; 06-29-2014 at 12:26 AM.

  4. #4
    Senior Member elarson's Avatar
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    It's interesting that you mention this. My husband has some cognitive issues, especially when he is tired, and the push-to-lock seems to definitely confuse him more than the D's Locks pull-to-lock. I'll be really happy, hopefully tomorrow, when we get his other chair working with the D's Locks pull-to-lock, because having them both has been really confusing for him. As a care partner, I'm also a bit dyslexic, and for whatever reason my brain seems to find the pull-to-lock more logical. Unfortunately, almost all taxi drivers and aids seem to get confused by the pull-to-lock.

    Quote Originally Posted by lazierdog View Post
    ... Also, when I'm out of my chair and I have to lock the brakes for whatever reason, pushing the lock pushes the chair away from you so it's much harder to lock them with one hand because the chair wants to roll away from you. When they're pull to lock, you're pulling the chair towards you so it's infinitely easier to lock them. ...
    Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by elarson View Post
    It's interesting that you mention this. My husband has some cognitive issues, especially when he is tired, and the push-to-lock seems to definitely confuse him more than the D's Locks pull-to-lock. I'll be really happy, hopefully tomorrow, when we get his other chair working with the D's Locks pull-to-lock, because having them both has been really confusing for him. As a care partner, I'm also a bit dyslexic, and for whatever reason my brain seems to find the pull-to-lock more logical. Unfortunately, almost all taxi drivers and aids seem to get confused by the pull-to-lock.
    Pull-to-locks make sense to me. But this may be because the many many hospital-style chairs I had since childhood got me used to that directionality. The pull-to-locks on my current Quickie confuse a lot of folks--at wheelchair rugby, other players will try to move my day chair out of the way to retrieve a lost ball and have trouble. Ditto carers. But I figure it's because these days pull-to-locks are something of a rarity. (I note that pull-to-locks aren't even an OPTION on some modern rigids.)

    Push-to-locks and scissors have of course become the de facto standard because they are out of the way during sideways transfers. This isn't relevant to me because I can't transfer that way, I have to be jerked up out of my chair and onto my feet. So what I need is a brake lever I can REACH with my unstraightenable T-rex arms. And that means pull locks with extension handles. Push locks simply won't work, because they are designed to lie down when in the 'on' position. Pull locks made to this design (which is too may of them) also won't work for me. TiLite's unilock, if it's the one I'm thinking of, is a lock that can be adjusted to be either pull- or push-to-lock. But it's built so that it lies flat in one position (so it's out of the way for those transfers when set on 'push'), so it is completely unusable for me as a pull lock because I CAN'T REACH IT, and putting an extension handle on it doesn't make ANY bloody difference because then the handle is still sticking out more or less parallel to the ground and too low for me to reach it. I have Quickie pull-to-lock brakes with extension handles on BOTH chairs, and I'm beginning to fear that sooner or later Quickie too will "improve" its pull-to-lock brakes to be completely useless for me and for everyone else who requires extension handles for reasons of reach rather than leverage. /rant

    OP, if you have the requisite hand function and ability to reach locks that live under the seat, I don't think anyone's going to argue that the scissor locks are the best of that bunch. If you can manage them, the only disadvantage I can see is one less place to hang your keys! :-) But try before you buy, if you possibly can.

  6. #6
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    I know nothing about D's. All other locks no matter what the situation and setup, simply will wear over time. I am running Tilite scissor. Did initially have composite push-to-lock. Those broke I think in less than 1 year. I moved to composite scissor lock. These things I think are great. I can use entire circumference of wheel no matter where I grab hold and never smash hands. Push-to-lock, do not allow this, simply because brake is mounted in location just raising above-against tire. Therefore, the brake limits your ability to grab wheel anywhere and push using entire wheel. The scissor did break also shortly after warranty ran out. I did talk with then and explained. The did give me new free as well as said they made improvement to the breaking. These do appear they will last longer.

  7. #7
    Senior Member elarson's Avatar
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    This is an interesting discussion about brakes.

    I also see that all of the TiLite Out-Front composite brakes can be both push and pull to lock, also with the extension handles. I'm not sure if they are out of the way enough for you QTiPi, but maybe they would work. This is a link to the Out-Front website that shows all of the composite brakes (TiLite acquired Out-Front in late 2010). They also have a FAQ that might help.

    Here are all the options from the current TiLite Options Brochure:
    Name:  TiLite_Options-2014-Wheel-Locks.jpg
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Size:  124.3 KB

    I just went back to look at the original "standard" aluminum push-to-lock with extensions he had on a 2GX folding chair from 2011. Now I am wondering if they were not what are now updated and called "Uni-Locks". Here is a photo (Click to see larger, because I was not able to upload it):

    Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

  8. #8
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    Picture #1 is a good illustration of my problem. As a push lock, it makes perfect sense, because in the locked position the handle is out of the way for transfers (the ones I can't do). When the idiots use that same design for a PULL lock, however, you get a handle that lies this low when it is OFF, and is therefore impossible for me to reach without leaning waaaay forward (and, of course, a handle that IS in the way when locked). The setup of #5 looks much better for a pull lock, though there's no reason it should curve away from the user if it's a pull lock--that just makes it harder to reach without, again, any benefit for transfers. The people who choose pull locks do so knowing that the handle will inevitably be in the way for side transfers if they do them, they accept that. Is it too much to expect that the design (ie handle shape) for pull locks actually be suitable for the purpose and not a repurposed push-lock design?

    Anyway, that's part of the reason I say try before you buy, because not all brakes with the same name are actually similar in usability, and also because as rimtrhmiles says some people are either prone to injuries from their brakes or are limited by the steps they have to take to avoid those injuries.

  9. #9
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    If you want, let me know, I will take some pictures. My lock when open is total under the seat. When locked, it extends beyond wheel maybe 1". It operates parallel to ground. Thickness of arms maybe 1/2". The extension and thickness are only issues for material getting in way too do transfer. Do not know if you would have issue in operation. Entire idea of lock is mounted under seat and allows you the full 360 degree of rotation of wheel without hands hitting into brake when unlocked.

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