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Thread: Doorways in a newly built house

  1. #1
    Senior Member Andy's Avatar
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    Doorways in a newly built house

    It's summer again, so time for me to kick around my 'get out of dodge' relocation plan. I am scoping out land in subdivisions to build a new house on for this round of tire-kicking. Since I am going with the cheepskate house on a slab, and looking at pictures of what the builders build...it seems all the doors are the preframed variety that seem to have a 2 or 3 inch or so threshold on the bottom of the doorway. Not good.

    Is this typically just a cheap door issue, or some sort of building code requirement for a slab house? Experiences with this?

    On a side note...do you think that subdivision covenants regarding livestock are enforced? I have this idea of raising chickens and having a pet goat might be fun...bet the neighbors will just love me, eh? lol

  2. #2
    If the 3 inch threshold is a local code, why couldn't the floor level inside be flush? I assume the high threshold is a water thing. You could always just build and ramp up the 3 inches on the outside after inspection as long as you plan for it from the beginning.

    Covenants are only good when they actively pursue enforcement. But whatever, roosters are likely to get the boot. Roosters are not allowed here in the city, but hens are. Goats are too btw.
    I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator Sue Pendleton's Avatar
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    Goats poop all over and it is often projectile! Andy, go visit a petting zoo before going near buying a goat.

    The spouse had our place done right before I left rehab and he didn't go hunting for permits. The guy he hired ripped out the front walk that had, hmm, one step off the drive another where it did a 90 degree turn and another at the front slab/door. The contractor tore out the 20 year old sidewalk and graded it to gently slope up as it went around and our double doors then had no threshold. Actually all the houses I was in back there in our neighborhood were slabs and the front doors were no thresholds. Side/kitchen and sliders to the rear had them but they weren't deep. You may see thresholds because of the weather especially if the doors are directly exposed to blowing and drifting snow. Back in Maryland the front entrances were all hidden from the street in small covered alcoves and snow came in flurries normally not blizzards. The inside of the door should have a bottom sweep to seal out cold air and rain.

    Now regular Midwest ranches with a front stoop often do have a threshold for both weather protection and they last longer. Maybe make a list of everything you've seen or heard might be problems and ask a local builder or the county department that handles permits to look it over and see if anything comes up as an impossible to waive for access issue. I know some people who have had the step down into the garage removed from plans by adding a hardwired with back up battery carbon monoxide detector system. Our current city now requires them anyway so no biggie.

    Are you looking on your side of the border again?

    Edit: I think the hens will work except in places like Napierville, Winetteka and other places a 1 bedroom shack goes for $750K.
    Last edited by Sue Pendleton; 06-26-2014 at 09:25 PM.
    Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

    Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

  4. #4
    Just specify flush or recessed thresholds. Say 3/4" should turn wind driven water back with a good seal. Use adjustable bottom door sweeps. Also plan your entry doors to be under an exterior roof. This reduces the snow and rain attacking the threshold and you while fiddling with the door.

    As for the goat sounds like a bad idea. They a fairly dumb creature and will get in to problems that you are responsible for getting them out. Pygmy goat would be workable. Be aware the males pleasure them selves and pee on their faces. This combination produces a foul smell, not conducive to petting. Now you got to wash your dam goat. O yes and there is the head butting. The goat will be dominate if you let him and he will butt you.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Andy View Post
    Is this typically just a cheap door issue...
    Yup. It's a way of keeping costs as low as possible.

    I'd pay a little extra for a setup like this:

    Threshold: http://www.pemko.com/index.cfm?event...s=2005AT%3A902

    Sweep: http://www.pemko.com/index.cfm?event...452BDGNB%3A893

    Note that really good caulking under the threshold is critical for water control.

  6. #6
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    I built mine with all low profile thresholds. You special order them. They work great and you can have your sliding or french doors with low profile sills too.

  7. #7
    my garage has a slight threshold no biggie we gradually ramped up the concrete to it you cant even really tell its been done plus we built my house were the front is level with the front porch the floor joist on the house are just lower same size but kinda like on a brick ledge once again I have no steps except the basement witch I use a chair lift I got pics if you wanna check it out




    good luck with the chickens my homeowners would freak out lol


    you goathead
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  8. #8
    Senior Member ~Lin's Avatar
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    Goats are also incredibly difficult to contain, they can escape most fencing for fun.
    Board Member of Assistance Dog Advocacy Project working in Education. Feel free to ask me any service dog questions!

    I am not paralyzed. I have a genetic connective tissue disorder with neuro complications and a movement disorder.

  9. #9
    Super Moderator Sue Pendleton's Avatar
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    Oops. OK, not exactly a threshold but after we ripped out the old flooring and tiled the kitchen, family room and front hall we did have a thin furring strip added between the tile inside and the concrete outside. It was so smooth it was never a problem.
    Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

    Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Andy's Avatar
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    Thanks guys, nice to hear some encouragement on how this might work out. Some of the photos I've seen I was like...WTF? A step in the middle of the doorway? I guess I'm used to my 1920's brick fortress where the doors have maybe a 1/2" high lump of wood under them...easily fixed.

    So goats are not so good. How about this...a pet cow? That shouldn't stink up the 'hood too much, right? I was thinking free-range alligator farming, but I think they would want a more tropical climate though. Reason I'm coming up with this plan is I felt that some of the subdivisions were being a bit snobby after reading one covenant about 'no slab houses'. I want the mechanics where I can get at them easily, and why pay for a basement I wont use? So I figure why not think of ways to get back at them (other than parking my car on the front lawn and removing the wheels). I guess that is one of the pitfalls of hunting for a lot at least 1/2 acre, preferably 1 acre with gas/water/sewer.

    Sue...its NW Indiana time I think, less property taxes. Hard part is getting municipal water and sewer as I'm thinking outskirts of the developed areas, not so sure on the well and septic scheme, know nothing about that.

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