Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: the Achilles heel of antibiotic-resistant bugs

  1. #1
    Senior Member PC720's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Memphis Tennessee
    Posts
    196

    the Achilles heel of antibiotic-resistant bugs

    finally some good news fight against antibiotic-resistant bugs like mrsa (*****correction: the proposed strategy only affects gram-negative bacteria. MRSA is gram positive so it would not be affected). honestly hope this leads to some new medications.
    Article
    New research reveals an Achilles' heel in the defensive barrier which surrounds drug-resistant bacterial cells. The findings pave the way for a new wave of drugs that kill superbugs by bringing down their defensive walls rather than attacking the bacteria itself. It means that in future, bacteria may not develop drug-resistance at all. Credit: Diamond Light Source
    Scientists at the University of East Anglia have made a breakthrough in the race to solve antibiotic resistance.
    New research published today in the journal Nature reveals an Achilles' heel in the defensive barrier which surrounds drug-resistant bacterial cells.
    The findings pave the way for a new wave of drugs that kill superbugs by bringing down their defensive walls rather than attacking the bacteria itself. It means that in future, bacteria may not develop drug-resistance at all.

    The discovery doesn't come a moment too soon. The World Health Organization has warned that antibiotic-resistance in bacteria is spreading globally, causing severe consequences. And even common infections which have been treatable for decades can once again kill.

    Researchers investigated a class of bacteria called 'Gram-negative bacteria' which is particularly resistant to antibiotics because of its cells' impermeable lipid-based outer membrane.

    This outer membrane acts as a defensive barrier against attacks from the human immune system and antibiotic drugs. It allows the pathogenic bacteria to survive, but removing this barrier causes the bacteria to become more vulnerable and die.

    Until now little has been known about exactly how the defensive barrier is built. The new findings reveal how bacterial cells transport the barrier building blocks (called lipopolysaccharides) to the outer surface.

    Group leader Prof Changjiang Dong, from UEA's Norwich Medical School, said: "We have identified the path and gate used by the bacteria to transport the barrier building blocks to the outer surface. Importantly, we have demonstrated that the bacteria would die if the gate is locked."

    "This is really important because drug-resistant bacteria is a global health problem. Many current antibiotics are becoming useless, causing hundreds of thousands of deaths each year.

    "The number of super-bugs are increasing at an unexpected rate. This research provides the platform for urgently-needed new generation drugs."

    Lead author PhD student Haohao Dong said: "The really exciting thing about this research is that new drugs will specifically target the protective barrier around the bacteria, rather than the bacteria itself.

    "Because new drugs will not need to enter the bacteria itself, we hope that the bacteria will not be able to develop drug resistance in future."
    Last edited by PC720; 06-20-2014 at 11:33 AM.

  2. #2
    Eventually the bacteria will find a way around the new barriers. Hopefully there will be a break that will give people time to catch their breath. The newest challenge that has emerged is anti-fungal resistant fungi. Evolution continues on all fronts.
    You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
    http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

    See my personal webpage @
    http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

  3. #3
    Senior Member willingtocope's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Pleasant Hill Iowa
    Posts
    1,097
    There has been much research into another "gram negative bacteria"...Chlamydophila pneumonia...as a possible cause for some cases of multiple sclerosis. It has been shown that this bacteria exists in the body in several forms...and can be attacked by a combination of antibiotics. I wonder if this study is headed in the same direction.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chlamyd...oniae#Diseases
    www.cpnhelp.org

  4. #4
    Senior Member PC720's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Memphis Tennessee
    Posts
    196
    made a correction to the above. Mrsa is a gram positive bacteria so apparently the above will not work on it. sorry for any confusion.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-27-2013, 08:00 AM
  2. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 08-23-2006, 12:23 AM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-25-2003, 11:08 AM
  4. antibiotic resistant infection
    By starlightangel in forum Care
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 06-11-2003, 04:16 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •