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Thread: Stem Cell study at UCSD

  1. #1

    Stem Cell study at UCSD

    From the San Diego Union-Tribune, May 11, 2014:

    After many years of waiting, a flood of new regenerative-cell therapies is finally reaching patients. Hundreds of clinical trials for these experimental treatments are under way across the world.

    In the United States, 774 trials with stem or other regenerative cells are open to patients or soon will be, according to clinicaltrials.gov, which lists government-approved clinical testing in this country and abroad. Of that total, 147 are taking place in California.

    One of the most difficult tests involving stem cells -- repairing spinal-cord damage that has caused complete loss of movement and sensation below the injury site -- is set to begin soon at UC San Diego.

    Patients in that study will get injections of fetal-derived neural stem cells in and around the injury site, along with physical therapy and immune-system drugs in case there?s a reaction to the stem cells. The trial will use a device that delivers precisely targeted ?micro-injections? of cells to the targeted areas.

    The clinical trial will test safety and look for early signs of efficacy, said Dr. Joseph Ciacci, a UC San Diego neurosurgeon leading the testing.

    A study published a year ago found that in rats with spinal-cord injuries, the neural stem cells significantly improved movement in the hind paws. Ciacci, who co-authored that study, saw the cells proliferate and fill in a spinal-cord cavity that had resulted from the injuries. Such results supported testing the therapy in people, he said, but he declined to say whether he expected to see any improvement in those patients.

    “I really don’t know, because it’s not been done,” Ciacci said.

    The clinical trial is expected to start in June. It’s intended for adults 18 to 65 years old who suffered their injury at least one year ago but no more than two years ago. For more information, visit utsandiego.com/ucsdspinal or call Amber Faulise at (858) 657-5175.
    The rest of this story

    (KLD)

  2. #2
    Great News! Thank you KLD.
    "I'm manic as hell-
    But I'm goin' strong-
    Left my meds on the sink again-
    My head will be racing by lunchtime"

    <----Scott Weiland---->

  3. #3
    Senior Member PC720's Avatar
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    in case anybody is wondering, I do believe this to be Neuralstem's phase 1 for chronic Sci using NSI-566 which is the same treatment they are giving ALS patients.

  4. #4
    I have signed up for it, I really hope I get chosen! If it doesn't work then I'm out nothing, if it does and I can get some % of my movement back I will be ecstatic! I was very active before the accident and would like out of this chair so I can at least do some of the things I used to, like shower standing up or getting out of bed at 3:00AM to pee!

  5. #5
    "If it doesn't work then I'm out nothing"

    Actually you might then become ineligible for other clinical trials that may or not be more effective. Its also understandable that without trial participants we wont find out if a trial is successful or not. Hope you get chosen.
    "I'm manic as hell-
    But I'm goin' strong-
    Left my meds on the sink again-
    My head will be racing by lunchtime"

    <----Scott Weiland---->

  6. #6
    The patients in this trial will be chronic & complete (Asia A)? I wonder if there are any chronic & complete animal studies using this treatment that would justify using these patients.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Nowhere Man View Post
    The patients in this trial will be chronic & complete (Asia A)? I wonder if there are any chronic & complete animal studies using this treatment that would justify using these patients.
    A lot of things can be done with humans that can't be done the same way in animals, mainly being intensive, high volume activity based therapy. If safety of the treatment can be confirmed in a phase I trial, logical next step for a phase II/III would be adding in intensive therapy.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by tomsonite View Post
    A lot of things can be done with humans that can't be done the same way in animals, mainly being intensive, high volume activity based therapy. If safety of the treatment can be confirmed in a phase I trial, logical next step for a phase II/III would be adding in intensive therapy.

    So are you saying that the treatment has not shown any success in any type of SCI injured rats? Not even acute or incomplete? Because rats can't receive high volume activity base therapy. It is a shot in the dark?

  9. #9
    Why was this therapy approved so quickly and Dr. Young's has not been? Was it approved so quickly because it is only for injuries 1-2 years? Wonder why they aren't using lithium also? When did they apply to start this trial? If it turns out bad would it affect Dr. Young's starting his trial? Was their data published in a Medical Journal?

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Nowhere Man View Post
    So are you saying that the treatment has not shown any success in any type of SCI injured rats? Not even acute or incomplete? Because rats can't receive high volume activity base therapy. It is a shot in the dark?
    I don't know if the treatment has or hasn't shown any success in any type of SCI injured rats. There is some animal research suggesting efficacy of neural stem cells in rats, though nothing more significant than Paul Lu's study which has now been contradicted by a study you posted recently.
    My point was that rats (or other animals) usually don't and in some cases can't receive the same kind of high intensity, high volume ABT that humans can. Thus, if a rat's ability to ambulate is not restored by stem cells or some other kind of regenerative treatment, that is not a reason to not test something in humans. As always, this is my opinion/guess/"shot in the dark".

    Actually, if you want a rat study, look up the study co-authored by Ciacci that was published last year. It is mentioned in the article that SCI-Nurse posted originally.

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